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Iran: The Coming Crisis: Radical Islam, Oil, and the Nuclear Threat Paperback – Bargain Price, July 3, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Multnomah Books (July 3, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 159052764X
  • ASIN: B00394DLCS
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,229,331 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Mark Hitchcock graduated from law school in 1984 and worked for a judge at the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals for four years. After a clear call to full time ministry, he attended Dallas Theological Seminary and graduated in 1991. Since that time he has served as senior pastor of Faith Bible Church in Edmond, Oklahoma, which has an average Sunday attendance of one thousand. He completed his PhD at DTS in January 2006. He has authored fourteen books related to end time Bible prophecy, and served as contributing editor for the Left Behind Prophecy Club for three years. Mark and his wife, Cheryl, live in Edmond, Oklahoma with their two sons.

More About the Author

Attorney Mark Hitchcock thought his career was set after graduating from law school in 1984 and getting a job working with a judge at the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals. But after what Mark calls a "clear call to full-time ministry," he changed course and went to Dallas Theological Seminary, completing a masters degree in 1991 and a doctoral degree in 2006. Since 1991 Mark has served as senior pastor of Faith Bible Church in Edmond, Oklahoma. He has authored 15 books related to end-time Bible prophecy and was the contributing editor for the Internet-based Left Behind Prophecy Club for four years. Mark and his wife, Cheryl, live in Edmond with their two sons, Justin and Samuel.

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Erin J. on June 4, 2007
Format: Paperback
With the onslaught of materiel being poured out on the subject of Iran and its supposed role in Bible prophecy, it would be a challenging task for anyone to write anything fresh and original on the subject. Nevertheless, Mark Hitchcock has thrown his hat into the ring. This may not be the most sensational books on the subject, but it is one of the fairer treatments that you will see.

There are several things about this book that are good. First, Mark writes with a reader friendly, teaching style instead of the loud preachy style of someone like John Hagee. Two, his historical information about Persia and Babylon was presented in a memorable way. Third, the information on Iran was fair, informative, and quite possibly right as regards to their being a nuclear threat. Fourth, he at least makes an effort to deal with objections to his view of Ezekiel 38-39 and does not just assume that everyone is on board with him. I do think, however, that he is wrong when he says the "vast majority" of scholars see Ezekiel 38-39 as having a future literal fulfillment in the sense that they see Russia, Iran, etc, coming down to attack the modern day nation of Israel. In fact, I think the only safe thing to say there is that the vast majority of dispensational scholars see it as fulfilled in this manner. For a past fulfillment, he seems to indicate that only preterists take a past fulfillment view of this passage, but that is far from accurate. One does not have to be a preterist, to believe that Ezekiel 38-39 has been fulfilled or all of the OT for that matter.
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26 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on July 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
Mark Hitchcock's book, Iran: The Coming Crisis, is an important book to be read even if you are not fully interested (which you should be, if you are a Christian) in prophecy. Even if you are not fully interested in eschatology, the book holds a wealth of information involving what is going on in the Middle East by way of Radical Islamics right at this very moment. The heart of the growing threat toward Israel and toward the Western world is that of Iran. Iran's focus in life is to bring forth a jihad against anyone and any nation that strives to oppose Iran's worldview of Islamic totalitarianism. The more we sit back and think that tomorrow will be a better day in the Middle East, as many a liberal minded person might suspect (these are the people that actually believe that the base person is good, which is shown to be false if you believe and trust the Bible that is Yahweh's words through both Testaments), the closer we get to the point where Iran will practically point a bomb toward our doorstep and toward Israel's doorstep (since radical Islam believes that Zion and the United States are together Satan). We must know and we must be diligent when dealing with such a nation as Iran because it holds its claws in the very lifeblood of much of the Middle East. This is not paranoia nor is this thought based upon trying to find prophecy under every rock, so to speak, this is cold hard fact--Iran will if not already has a nuclear arsenal that will be used against anyone and everyone they hate based upon their radical Islamic desire for extermination of all Christians and Jews.Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kevin M Quigg VINE VOICE on November 20, 2007
Format: Paperback
It is obvious that North Korea, Iran, and Pakistan having the bomb is dangerous. I believe all strategists know that these unstable regimes might be tempted to blow the planet up if they are going down the drain. Hitchcock tries to bring Bible readings as a justification for showing the end of the world. I believe any philosophy colored by religious fundamentalism causes problems in the world. Hitchcock might have a PhD in religion, but I feel he does not understand the Mideast enough to write a valid, scholarly work that would make strategists understand the problem of nuclear weapons better. This is a book written stating the undesireability of Iran getting nuclear weapons with some scripture thrown in.

This is not a well thought out book. There are better books out there to understand the crisis.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By John C. Dolan on March 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
So a pastor from Oklahoma is going to tell us the future of the Middle East. And, not surprisingly, it's all war and flames. Odd, how these people love to dream of fire and destruction. But what's really odd is that they've been peddling the same story of the coming end of the world for two thousand years. And they've been wrong consistently for two thousand years. What sort of madness can keep people like Mark Hitchcock betting on the end of the world when their predecessors have lost that bet ninety generations in a row?
Perhaps it's the fact that ninety generations of preachers have grown rich on that losing bet.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Earl A. Myers, Jr. on August 31, 2006
Format: Paperback
Enough already about the madman leader of Iran and his nuclear intentions and his rantings about obliterating Israel from the face of the earth. Hitchcock spends too time and effort focusing on yesterday's and today's headlines. Anyone with an ounce of sense and any degree of rationality knows that Ahmadinejad and his Islamic fanatical followers are rushing the world headlong down the path of universal annihilation.

The thrust of his book should have been on the role of Iran and its anti-semitic cohorts, namely Russia and most of the Middle East, in prophetic endtimes. Hitchcock does get around to it eventually but not until he has exhausted the readers patience with what has been and continues to be news concerning Iran's diabolic designs. He could have gotten to Ezekiel 38&39,as it relates to Iran, much sooner than all the rehashed verbiage that preceded it.

Next time, Mr. Hitchcock, get to the point. John Hagee's "Jerusalem Countdown" does a much better job of doing just that.
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