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Irish, Q&S: Learn to Speak and Understand Irish (Gaelic) with Pimsleur Language Programs (Quick & Simple) Audio CD – Audiobook

ISBN-13: 978-0743500159 ISBN-10: 0743500156 Edition: 8 Lessons

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Irish, Q&S: Learn to Speak and Understand Irish (Gaelic) with Pimsleur Language Programs (Quick & Simple) + Irish-English English-Irish Dict (Language Dictionaries Series) + Wicked Irish (Wicked S)
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Product Details

  • Series: Quick & Simple (Book 1)
  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Pimsleur; 8 Lessons edition (November 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743500156
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743500159
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 5.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #191,537 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dr. Paul Pimsleur devoted his life to language teaching and testing and was one of the world’s leading experts in applied linguistics. After years of experience and research, Dr. Pimsleur developed The Pimsleur Method based on two key principles:  the Principle of Anticipation and a scientific principle of memory training that he called “Graduated Interval Recall.”  This Method has been applied to the many levels and languages of the Pimsleur Programs.

More About the Author

For help in selecting the right Pimsleur Language Program for you, or with technical questions, call us at 1-800-831-5497, 24/7. For more information on Pimsleur, visit, www.pimsleur.com.

Dr. Paul Pimsleur (b. 1926, d. 1976) devoted his life to language teaching and testing and was one of the world's leading experts in applied linguistics. He was fluent in French, good in German, and had a working knowledge of Italian, Russian, Modern Greek, and Mandarin Chinese. After obtaining his Ph.D. in French and a Masters in Psychology from Columbia University, he taught French Phonetics and Linguistics at UCLA. He later became Professor of Romance Languages and Language Education, and Director of The Listening Center (a state-wide language lab) at Ohio State University; Professor of Education and Romance Languages at the State University of New York at Albany; and a Fulbright lecturer at the University of Heidelberg. He did research on the psychology of language learning and in 1969 was Section Head of Psychology of Second Language Learning at the International Congress of Applied Linguistics.

Dr. Pimsleur was a member of the American Association of Teachers of French (AATF), American Educational Research Association (AERA), Modern Language Association (MLA), and a founding member of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), who award the Paul Pimsleur Award for Research in Foreign Language Education every year.

His many books and articles revolutionized theories of language learning and teaching. After years of experience and research, Dr. Pimsleur developed a new method (The Pimsleur Method) that is based on two key principles: the Principle of Anticipation and a scientific principle of memory training that he called "Graduated Interval Recall." This Method has been applied to the many levels and languages of the "Pimsleur Programs."

Customer Reviews

I'm looking forward to being able to carry on a conversation with them this time.
Amazon Customer
I just finished listening to and learning the 8 lessons in the Pimsleur Irish Basic Course.
C. Wadsworth
The Munster dialect all but ignores certain peculiarities of the spoken Irish language.
Brad

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

89 of 91 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 28, 2002
Format: Audio Cassette
First, I have to confess that I belong to those who prefer to
learn a language by reading it - not just by listening. But if
you want to learn by listening this is indeed the course for you.
It is comprehensive and easy to use and you will be able to
communicate in Irish after fulfilling it.
As someone who has lived in Ireland and speak rather fluent Irish I would like to point out that the other reviewers are absolutely right when they say that this course teaches Munster Irish. It is one of the three major Irish dialects and as good a choice as any other dialect. Considering the fact that there already exits courses in the other dialects I'd say it's a wise choice to use Munster Irish. Besides, most famous Irish writers came from Munster and wrote in Munster Irish.
Since Brad has had some comments about Munster Irish I'd like to correct them. Munster Irish is NOT a minor dialect, it is still a living language which is widely taught both in schools and in courses for adults and foreigners. What Brad terms "Connaught Irish" (sic!) is a number of different dialects. A course could very well be based upon one of these dialect (The excellent course "Learning Irish" is just that) but they are neither more nor less correct or appropriate. I've lived in Ireland, both in areas where Munster Irish and Cois Fhairrge Irish (=what Brad calls "Connaught Irish") are spoken and I can promise that there are no problems with mutual comprehension, nor would the Irish speakers in these two areas understand Brad's comments about Munster.
All three major Irish dialect (Munster, Connacht and Ulster) are equal, and there are courses in all of them. Pimsleur is a conversational course in Munster Irish and it does a pretty good job of giving the beginner a basic foundation of Irish.
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47 of 49 people found the following review helpful By C. Wadsworth on January 1, 2000
Format: Audio Cassette
I just finished listening to and learning the 8 lessons in the Pimsleur Irish Basic Course. It is fantastic. Like all the Pimsleur programs, they take plenty of time to help you with pronunciation. (You'll need it with Irish.)Yet, they still move along quickly, teaching you more and more each lesson. The only downer was when I reached the end of Tape 8 and realized there was no more. I ENCOURAGE ANYONE WHO LIKES THIS COURSE TO WRITE SIMON & SCHUSTER AND ENCOURAGE THEM TO PRODUCE A FULL 30-LESSON COMPREHENSIVE IRISH COURSE. Irish is a fascinating language, and this is, without a doubt, the best way to tackle learning it.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By John L Murphy TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 8, 2006
Format: Audio CD
The pros and cons of these tapes have been sufficiently enumerated by the reviewers who've posted here. What I want to add is that the "First Course" version (a green cover, no Celtic Cross, more rectangular, whereas the Quick & Simple version is in a square white box) has not 4 CDs but 5. This 5th, called a User's Manual, explains how Dr. Paul Pimsleur developed his method of language learning and then introduces the rationale and set-up that the lessons will follow. Why mention this? On the 4CD newer version, it seems that no orientation is given. I happened to find the "Short Course" version, and having heard the 5th disc first, it greatly eased my expectations when I cued up the first lesson. Naturally, when you're beginning to study a language where for an English learner, Irish orthography differs so much from the spoken sounds, further jitters caused by not knowing why the Pimsleur method eschews texts only worsen one's readiness to learn Irish by imitation and example, as done here.

I leave the Munster dialect debate aside; I think that having speakers in all three major regional dialects would have been preferable, to condition one's ear to how Irish is spoken in the media. Now that you can get RnG feeds at your computer, hearing "real" Irish in its native setting is possible anywhere. The use of these tapes, I suppose, is to make you wrap your tongue and clear your throat around strenuous attempts to keep trying to speak out loud a bit of Irish. Granted, by the end of 8 hours you'll be able to hold a rudimentary conversation, but if you know that the course only aims at this limited ability, perhaps you'll better be able to judge if it's the kind of learning aid that works for you. These tapes are in many public libraries too, by the way.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Joe Murphy on November 6, 2000
Format: Audio Cassette
I found this product to be useful, but you need to know 2 things that I did not prior to my buying it.
1. It is the Munster dialect of Irish (one of the 3 primary dialects), and uses some words which not in the other 2 dialects(but are widely used in Munster Irish). The pronunciation of several other words are unique to Muster as well.
2. There is NO TEXT WHATSOEVER. No transcript. Nothing but the 4 tapes. I contacted the publisher, and they told me that it is a violation of the Pimsleur method to provide any text whatsoever. Hmmm. Okay. If you say so.
But I did like the style of going over the material again and again. Drilling the phrases. This process is lacking in the other Irish language products I have purchased. And I have purchased just about every one on the market.
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51 of 59 people found the following review helpful By M. Elizabeth Pietrzak on January 28, 2004
Format: Audio CD
I bought this CD because it looked like the best of my choices that were available at the bookstore at the time. I had searched for online resources and found that some great resources had disappeared on the web. I wanted to learn fluent Irish and I thought this would be my introduction.

My stumbling block came when I was trying to comprehend the huge number of variations on the dialects as represented by the online pronunciation guides and as spoken on these tapes. I was not able to finish the tapes primarily as a result of the anseo and ansin discrepencies spoken on this set. Every other resource I had found stated that "se" or "si" made the "s" sound slender and consequently should be pronounce "sh" but Pimsleur pronounces it as a broad "s".

Well, I probably wouldn't have worried much about this dialect variation, except that I was wanting to be able to read Irish as well as speak it. Know that if this CD is your only resource, you will learn to speak some Irish and understand a bit of some spoken Irish, but you will graduate from Pimsleur not being able to read a single street sign.

I spent a good deal of my time trying to hunt down the words that I was hearing on the CD, and just the simple confusing "anseo" or "anso" (the latter is the expected spelling from the pronunciation on the CD) rendered me lost and confused. I have just picked up Ó Sé's book and have discovered that what was sounding like "an Troid Voor" on Pimsleur is actually spelled "an Tsráid Mhór", which if you see it spelled will help in the pronunciation greatly.

My biggest hurdle came with the 8 ways that Dia dhuit could be pronounced by comparing the online pronunciations with this CD.
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