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The Irrational Atheist: Dissecting the Unholy Trinity of Dawkins, Harris, And Hitchens Hardcover – March 11, 2008

3.5 out of 5 stars 129 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Day does us all a service by exposing as false some of the glib slogans of atheism."  —Todd Seavey, American Council on Science and Health



"Good polemical stuff."  —nationalreview.com


"Whether you embrace Day’s theology or toss it, there is no avoiding the cumulative force of the author's counter assaults or the sting of his wit when it comes to the true focus of the book—atheism’s continuing love affair with nonsense."  —First Things

About the Author

Vox Day is a writer, columnist, software designer and the author of Rebel Moon,
The World in Shadow, and The War in Heaven: Eternal Warriors Book 1. He is the CEO of a technology corporation, writes a popular weekly political column, and maintains an active blog, Vox Popoli, which has 2,500 daily readers.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 305 pages
  • Publisher: BenBella Books (March 11, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1933771364
  • ISBN-13: 978-1933771366
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (129 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #596,097 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Understanding what is being presented in this book is a bit like looking at an autostereogram. The image is there clear as Day... but if you don't know how to look you won't see it.

As a former atheist (who was a former baptist) who spent years on the internet advocating atheism/agnosticism, attending Atheist conferences in order to meet the men pushing the ideas being taken to task here, and still holding a warm regard for the chance meeting of Daniel Dennett while waiting for an airport bus... I can confirm it would have been impossible for me to see the image a decade ago.

For the past couple of years though it's become impossible to miss and that change came about by being ardently skeptical of my skepticism. The journey continues but now I see the clever face emerging out of the background noise winking at us all. ;)
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Format: Hardcover
Despite approaching this from the perspective of a (weak) atheist who has admired Dawkins greatly over the years I enjoyed this book. Anyone who doesn't want to slip into the comfy zone of only ever debating and discussing with people who concur might disagree but, personally, I think that knowing your opponent is preferable. And, when your opponent manages to strike some good blows AND entertain you into the bargain it has to be a good outcome.

Vox Day has, in general, steered clear of cant and, instead, directly addressed the facts and assertions employed by Harris, Dawkins and Dennett and it is here that, for me at least, the book had the most value. Vox has done his research and lucidly sets out his facts. I think that there are clearly flaws in some of the argumentation, as has been pointed out in other reviews, with a-priori assumption of that to be proved being the most common complaint. However, it's entertaining if you like the mental exercise.

Having said that, I would love to have a book from Vox that addresses the fundamentals; my view is that the impact of a fact, for good or ill, has no bearing whatsoever on its veracity. One can argue that atheism or theism leads to better or worse outcomes but it is fundamentally irrelevant to the argument. Ultimately, there is or there is not a God - period.

Therefore it is entirely pointless for either side to argue for or against the existence of God on the basis of whether that means people behave better, do or do not persecute other races or any other consequence; benign or malign. The consequences are our problem.

In fact, I would love to have books from both sides that directly address the fundamentals rather than long treatises on who behaves better, produces better laws etc etc.
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Format: Hardcover
Brilliant book.
This book stood on my shelve for a year or two before I read it. Although I'm not an idiot (I did manage to obtain two degrees) I thought I would not be able to follow the arguments of the author (with an IQ of 150+). I'm also not a philosopher, and English is not my first language. I need not have feared, I now only hope that my review would do this important book justice.

Vox Day makes his arguments eloquently and easy to understand for midwits like me.
He tackles the fallacious arguments of New Atheists Dawkins, Harris and Hitchens and give them a thorough routing. I wonder whether they would indulge me (and I'm sure many others) and agree to debate Vox Day.
He factually destroys their arguments (e.g. that religion is the primary cause of war, Vox points out that only 6.9% of all wars reported in the Encyclopedia of Wars can be said to have had religious causes) and logic (e.g. Vox explains that a moral system based on loving God and submitting to His will is different from and far more objective than The Golden Rule, which is entirely subjective). He also displays a sense of humor (e.g. Vox on Christians holding Jews liable for the murdering of Jesus - "I still don't see how it makes sense to hold it against them, though; perhaps my philosophy is that if a guy comes back from the dead, no harm no foul applies.").

Perhaps the chapter that held the most significance for me was Chapter XV - MASTER OF PUPPETS OR GAME DESIGNER? and I had a sense of deja vu when later reading the chapters on DNA and Information in Lennox' GOD'S UNDERTAKER. Yes, having been raised Protestant (although I no longer hold any preference for any particular denomination) it did challenge my views, but again Vox is convincing in his arguments. Perhaps Vox and Lennox can collaborate and explore the question of God omnipotence v omniderigence.

All in all a well written book and worth buying a hard copy.
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Format: Paperback
An excellent read. The books is fairly short and to the point. Vox breaks down common Atheist arguments that are resoundingly untrue. Of course plenty of smart Atheists know they are untrue, but these positions still float about, misleading the faithful and the faithless. For example, he breaks down the Religion Causes War argument by (wow) actually reviewing history. Even keeping Islam in the mix it is untrue, without Islam it is laughable.

I would suggest this book for late high school students or those in college, where a lot of false pro-Atheist positions are assumed true. It will help not just with professors, but responding to late-night rants by budding atheists. It may not sway the atheists (some people will not listen) but it will strengthen the student and those listening. I would even suggest this book to ardent atheists - they should know their faith as well.
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