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Irreconcilable Differences Paperback – August 1, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 312 pages
  • Publisher: Flying Pen Press LLC (August 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0981895719
  • ISBN-13: 978-0981895710
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,519,394 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Byron C. Howes on September 17, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am not a huge fan of the cyberpunk science-fiction genre. It usually sits somewhere between noir and goth and tends to take itself way too seriously.

James R. Strickland's Irreconcilable Differences is a refreshing exception. Set in a credible and very interesting near-dystopian future, the novel focuses on the conflicting (and more than occasionally amusing) interactions between its protagonists. Strickland's skills as an author shine in the rich way he develops his characters and their relationships -- unusual in this sort of science fiction novel.

The book succeeds beyond being simply a character study. The relationships among the main characters are developed within a twisting and action-packed plot more reminiscent of Ian Fleming than of William Gibson. Better described as cyberthriller than cyberpunk, the novel pulls the reader into a conflict between government, corporation and individual while at the same time maintaining very a very human and personal flavor.

Irreconcilable Differences easily fills the promises made in the author's previous work Looking Glass, and I look forward to his next work.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Michael S. Sargent on September 15, 2008
Format: Paperback
Strickland's sophomore effort for Flying Pen Press builds on the mastery, and creative bending, of established cyberpunk conventions he so skillfully demonstrated in his debut title Looking Glass. His latest work, Irreconcilable Differences, takes us even further into his dismantled, post-collapse, North America and beyond the dystopic industrial cores and fantastic corporate techno-palaces typical of the genre and brings it to new, and equally-gritty locales; a family farm, a motor home, and, sometimes most disturbing, high school.

Along the way he introduces readers to an unlikely pair of central characters, Kansas teenager and aspiring hackergirl Michelle Marie "Micki" "Hotwire" Blake, and Inspector Rachel Santana, Interpol Covert Services, whose odd-couple, 'buddy cop' interactions provide an extra-wide window into the intricate, and all-too-believable world of 'flyover country' hacker gangs and the devastating effects of personal will magnified by asymmetric technology.

Looking Glass showed us that Strickland can do cyberpunk without resorting to a pastiche of Gibson, Morgan et. al. With Irreconcilable Differences he shows us how to take it to its next level.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on October 9, 2008
Format: Paperback
Those glorious golden age sci-fi pulp magazines have now been reincarnated with the introduction of five trade paperback science fiction novels of galactic adventure, save-the-world suspense, and the merged technologies of magic and science. James R. Strickland's "Irreconcilable Differences" is a superbly imaginative cyberpunk mystery thriller. With their brightly colored 'pulp magazine' style covers, all five of these new titles from Flying Pen Press are enthusiastically recommended for fantasy and science fiction enthusiasts, and would make enduringly popular addition to community library collections.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on July 5, 2010
Format: Paperback
Strickland takes a different angle here from his first book 'Looking Glass'. We're still in the cyberpunk world, but the focus is much more on the interactions between the two main characters, who are literally inseparable. One is a teenage girl, and the other is a software copy of a government agent - loaded into the girl's brain. I was worried it might bog down in 'adult subjected to teenage awkwardness' gags, but Strickland keeps it moving and produces another fun read.
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