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Is he Popenjoy? Paperback – August 19, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-1177458825 ISBN-10: 1177458829

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 438 pages
  • Publisher: Nabu Press (August 19, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1177458829
  • ISBN-13: 978-1177458825
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 0.9 x 9.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,182,978 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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This is a good book to start reading Trollope.
James Paris
Trollope is a master of the language---in my opinion the best of that period---which includes Dickens and Thackery.
John A. Corzine
I think the Dean's love for his daughter, though a bit overdone, was especially touching.
Mimbelina

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By James Paris on November 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
Anthony Trollope's 47 novels contain many surprises, one of which is this delightful novel, which bears one of the most unlikely titles in all of literature. There is no better way to leave the megrims by the wayside than to immerse yourself into another time and place. Trollope was the Victorian story-teller par excellence. After having read a quarter of his vast output, I have yet to discover a clinker in the bunch.

A notorious curmudgeon, the Marquess of Brotherton has quitted England for the sunny shores of Italy. News filters back to his relatives that he has married an Italian and fathered a male heir, given the courtesy title of Lord Popenjoy. His mother and siblings are in a tizzy, as they are asked to quit the premises of the ancestral home to make way for a return of the prodigal head of the family with wife and heir.

It seems, however, that there is little news and much doubt about the legality of the Marquess's nuptuals; and therefore doubt as to whether his so-called son is actually the heir Popenjoy.

There is a delightful fox hunt (common to many of Trollope's novels), and a stormy marriage between the Marquess's young brother and a clergyman's daughter. She dares to dance the forbidden Kappa Kappa (the Lambada of its day) with a young wastrel, and raises the protective ire of every duenna within a hundred mile radius.

Look for some very amusing -- and controversial -- put-downs of the emerging feminist movement.

This is a good book to start reading Trollope. His two long series -- the Barsetshire and Palliser novels -- require a long commitment. Popenjoy is just right!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Domestic Virtues on June 14, 2006
Format: Paperback
Trollope's best known novels are the Barchester series, which focuses on clerical life and church-related issues, and the Palliser series, which deals largely with politics. The lesser-known Trollope novels, however, include some of my personal favorites; they have little to do either with politicians or with the clergy, but are essentially comedies of manners.

In Trollope's Is He Popenjoy?, young Mary Lovelace is rich, pretty, innocent, and fond of having 'nonsense' spoken to her. Lord George Germain, younger brother to the Marquis of Brotherton, is exceedingly handsome, but also staid, stodgy, and short of money - and he has never spoken a word of nonsense in his life. His elder brother, who lives in Italy, is a bachelor; Lord George has therefore some expectations of eventually becoming the next Marquis. When he marries Miss Lovelace after a disappointment over another young lady - his cousin, Adelaide de Baron - the couple first live at Manor Cross with Lord George's widowed mother and his three spinster sisters. Lady Sarah, Lady Susannah, and Lady Amelia are virtuous women, but stodgy and severe like their brother, and not very congenial company for the young bride. Before approving the marriage, however, Mary's father, the Dean of Brotherton, stipulated that his daughter should have a house of her own in London and spend half of the year there.

In London, George is soon being pursued by his old flame Adelaide de Baron, now Mrs Houghton, while Mary starts a friendship with Adelaide's cousin, Captain de Baron - a young man adept at speaking the nonsense Mary so enjoys hearing. Captain de Baron understands the innocent nature of his intimacy with Mary ('more like that of children than grown people,' as he tells a mutual friend).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mimbelina on May 25, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a second son, Lord George Germain is content to remain in the background. His elder brother, who has cast off those same cares and responsibilities, lives in Italy and depends on him to take care of the family lands and tenants. Though not the reigning Marquis, George enjoys living a quiet and repressed life in the family manor. He also enjoys the freedom to choose a bride and, after being disappointed in his first love because of his penury, finds solace in the wealthy arms of the local Dean's daughter, Mary Lovelace. Mary is an innocent, fun-loving girl with a vivid imagination who is doted upon by her father and dreams of being swept away by a romantic hero. Though George is quite different from her daydream knight, she accepts his offer of marriage and teaches herself that she will come to love him eventually.

George and Mary take up residence with George's mother and sisters at Manor Cross, where Mary is sorely tried by the prim and proper lifestyle and rigid moral standards. Luckily, a premarital stipulation made by her father requires Lord George to acquire a home in London for the season, where she wholeheartedly flees. She quickly finds herself in trouble there. Though innocent in nature, the friendship that she forms with a dashing young captain begins to stir up gossip that angers her husband. His jealousy is provoke and, though he's guilty himself of romantic intrigues with his former love, he becomes angry with Mary and her would-be suitor. A rift in their relationship quickly ensues and is made worse by the return of his elder brother with an Italian wife and a son whose parentage is brought into question.
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