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Iserson's Getting Into a Residency: A Guide for Medical Students, 7th Edition Paperback – July 10, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-1883620097 ISBN-10: 1883620090 Edition: 7th

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 627 pages
  • Publisher: Galen Press, Ltd.; 7th edition (July 10, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1883620090
  • ISBN-13: 978-1883620097
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #184,070 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Kenneth V. Iserson, M.D., MBA, FACEP, FAAEM, FIFEM (1949- ) born in Washington, DC, migrated to the American Southwest at his earliest opportunity. After nearly three decades as a teacher, clinician and bioethicist at The University of Arizona in Tucson, he is now Professor Emeritus of Emergency Medicine at The University of Arizona, Medical Director (Emeritus) of the Southern Arizona Rescue Association (search & rescue), a Supervisory Physician with Arizona's Disaster Medical Assistance Team (AZ-1), and a member of the American Red Cross disaster response team.

The author of hundreds of scientific articles on emergency medicine and biomedical ethics, he has also authored numerous books. His most popular book, "Iserson's Getting Into a Residency: A Guide for Medical Students," is now in its revised, 8th edition. Another, "Death to Dust: What Happens to Dead Bodies?" was cited as one of the best reference books by the New York Public Libraries. His latest book, "Improvised Medicine: Providing Care in Extreme Environments," appeared in December 2012 (McGraw-Hill).

Dr. Iserson now limits his medical practice to global and disaster medicine. In the past few years, he has practiced or taught on all seven continents, including 6 months as Lead Physician for the US Antarctic Program, and work with NGOs in rural areas of Central and South America, Zambia, Bhutan, Ghana and South Sudan. He also runs the www.REEME.arizona.edu Project that freely distributes more than 700 Spanish-language PowerPoint presentations on Emergency Medicine.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 11 customer reviews
Overall, it is a solid book with a unique view on getting into residency and I recommend it.
K. W. Dodd
So, to end up, it's a little bit expensive in regard of what we really get as we don't need to know other sections of this book.
WAH
What I can say from what I have read is that this book is somewhat outdated (as of May 2011) despite its 2006 release date.
Brad

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A. Copeland on December 8, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book thinking that I needed it to be able to apply for residency programs. I found the book, even the most recent edition, to be very outdated in terms of the matching process and what programs are looking for. I don't think much went into updating the new edition because for a few years now, the Board exams have been computerized and the book still refers to the old 2 day process and it also stated that the osteopathic residency process was not through ERAS, which it is and has been for the last few years also. Another very minute example: the book recommends that women should only wear a skirt suit to interviews. I know women who have, but it is just as common if not more so to wear pants-the author must be a dinosaur to think that women have to wear a skirt in order to appear professional. I know these are not the most important things when applying but I feel that they are a good gage on the quality of the rest of the information provided.

I also wanted information on what to include in my personal statement but the most I got out of this book was 1 paragraph stating that medical school students put more stress on this aspect of their application than is necessary-not helpful. In the end, now that my interviews are over, I realize that this book is useless for applying to residency programs. There is much more current and apropos information on the internet or through your school's administration. Luckily, I was able to return it for a full refund.

Don't get suckered into spending another $50 on useless books in med school just because they say you need it!
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By George Wang on October 27, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There is a lot of good numerical information and details about where to find more information, but the book sounds like it was written by the Queen Bee of the gunner hive. Here is a quote:

"Extend your hand to the other person with the thumb up and out. Make sure that the web between your thumb and index finger meets the other person's web. Try to shake hands from the elbow, not the shoulder or wrist. It is also desirable to have reasonably dry hands."

If you can stand all the nagging "should haves" and "oughts" and "absolutely critical that you do this," then it's worthwhile to flip through and read the important bits. Just don't let it raise your blood pressure too much.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By tlynn g on November 28, 2010
Format: Paperback
very useful for what to do while applying. Probably useful for picking what specialty to apply to as well. Every med student should read it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By drruizcor on November 8, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is a really helpfull book, I wish I'd read it during the first years of Med School.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. W. Dodd on March 27, 2010
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I think the most beneficial aspects of Iserson's Getting Into A Residency are the strategy and etiquette sections about how to plan your clinical rotations, build your resume, and act throughout the application process. In my opinion, those are the most important sections for US applicants because the rest of the information can be found on the AAMCs general website or on the Careers in Medicine website. Overall, it is a solid book with a unique view on getting into residency and I recommend it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Brad on May 8, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I want to preface this review by saying that I have not read this entire book, but only some of the sections I thought were important to me as a late year MS3. There are sections on choosing a specialty etc. that I did not read that may or may not be valuable. What I can say from what I have read is that this book is somewhat outdated (as of May 2011) despite its 2006 release date. For example, it says that programs may use a cut off of 210 on the USMLE Step 1 when deciding whether to interview applicants... Um are you kidding? A large number of programs in Orthopaedic Surgery are using a cut off of 240 and I'm sure its the same in other competitive specialties! That is a drastic difference. It also does not necessarily focus on the most important aspects of applying to residency in detail enough. For example, the section on the USMLE Step 1, arguably the most important thing you will do to get into residency, is only a page or so long! There is also a lot of useless fluff like a section on how to sign up for the exam etc. which you honestly do not need a book for. The book that I have to compare it to is The Successful Match: 200 Rules to Succeed in the Residency Match, which is an amazing book, one of the best and most useful I have read during medical school. I honestly wrote this review after reading portions of this Iserson book specifically to steer people toward "The Successful Match" which I find far superior. The Iserson book doesn't use concrete data and the results of studies in the same way "The Successful Match" does and it doesn't really tell you HOW to succeed in med school.Read more ›
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