Islamophobia: Making Muslims the Enemy and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $9.18 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Dust jacket has a little corner wear and a light stain on the top-front. Very little other wear or signs of use. Great service. Fast shipping. Saving trees 1 page at a time! 100% MONEY BACK GUARANTEE!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Islamophobia: Making Muslims the Enemy Hardcover – July 26, 2007


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$15.77
$5.82 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Islamophobia: Making Muslims the Enemy + Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire + Islamophobia: The Ideological Campaign Against Muslims
Price for all three: $41.26

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (July 26, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0742552861
  • ISBN-13: 978-0742552869
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.7 x 8.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #275,503 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Gottschalk, a professor of religion at Wesleyan University, and his former student Greenberg analyze what Islamophobia is and how it is manifested through political cartoons, many of which are included with revealing results. The authors say that Islamophobia—a racistlike bias against Muslims based on stereotypes—is very real, manifesting in some cartoons that are obviously biased and others that appear on the surface to be more sympathetic. Cartoons, symbolic of wider feelings and paranoia about Islam, reflect misunderstandings and prejudice among Westerners and, like a self-fulfilling prophecy, often serve to widen cultural chasms, particularly between Muslims and American Christians. Symbols and caricatures, like the veil, the mosque, scimitars and large-nosed profiles, can be misused or conflicting; for example, the scimitar, frequently used to depict Muslim violence, is of doubtful Muslim heritage but is actually used in American military uniforms. Gottschalk and Greenberg offer a particularly chilling comparison of cartoon depictions of Jews prior to World War II and their Muslim counterpart caricatures today. Even cartoons mocking conservative Christians are more neutral and less intentional in their hatred, say the authors. With its incendiary cover art and on the heels of the Danish cartoon controversy, this book should attract well-deserved attention. (Oct.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

This ground-breaking book should be read and reread-readers will become acutely aware how cartoonists have repeatedly disparaged all things Muslim and Arab. The book teaches us to see beyond damaging stereotypes. It is a remarkable achievement, illustrating that although there exists a fine line between satire and racism. (Jack G. Shaheen, author of Reel Bad Arabs)

If 9/ll jolted Americans into a new awareness of Islam, it has produced less insight and understanding than caricature and fear. Part of the knowledge gap is due to Muslims themselves, but the larger problem derives from deliberate distortions projected via the media (radio, TV, print and the Internet) in concert with scurrilous scholarship and Christian right Islamophobes. This deftly constructed and amply illustrated volume by Gottschalk and Greenberg will expose Islamophobic distortions while also providing a much needed antidote to their public venom. (Bruce Lawrence, Duke University)

As Islamophobia threatens to become the new anti-Semitism, Islamophobia: Making Islam the Enemy becomes 'must' reading. Gottschalk and Greenberg perceptively and graphically demonstrate the extent to which prejudice and discrimination against Islam and Muslims have become inherent in American mainstream culture. (John L. Esposito, Georgetown University, author of What Everyone Needs to Know about Islam)

Islamophobia is an important contribution to the understanding of prejudice as a common factor in American culture, particularly the media. The analysis of political cartoons convincingly shows how pervasively anti-Arab and anti-Muslim attitudes have become accepted, even by people who probably consider themselves fair-minded. This study needs to be read by everyone concerned with the problems of religious and racial bias in America today. (Carl W. Ernst, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

A must read for anyone interested in understanding the underlying challenges that Muslims face in America. Provides an important insight into the stereotyping of Muslims that daily projects them as the different 'other.' (Yvonne Haddad, Georgetown University)

Islamophobia. Making Islam the Enemy is a very well-written, timely and incisive book about a topic that is finally starting to win the attention of the American public. The authors take the reader through a journey of Western suspicion and prejudicial depiction of the religion of Islam, from the Crusades to more recent political encounters with Muslim powers. They present a fascinating review of American media presentations of Islam and Muslims, including film, television and political cartoons. Islamophobia is a fairly presented, sharply critical exposé of the roots and manifestations of western fear and suspicion of this important world religion. It should be required of every high school and college student of history, political science and American social studies. (Jane Smith, Hartford Theological Seminary)

Gottschalk, a professor of religion at Wesleyan University, and his former student Greenberg analyze what Islamophobia is and how it is manifested through political cartoons, many of which are included with revealing results...With its incendiary cover art and on the heels of the Danish cartoon controversy, this book should attract well-deserved attention. (Publishers Weekly)

Contains a thoughtful discussion and is bound to stimulate interest among readers. (Middle East Journal, Winter 2008)

This slim volume by Gottschalk and Greenberg is a splendid teaching tool for classroom use, not only because it provides a readily accessible narrative about American stereotyping of Islam and Muslims, but also due to its focus on the political cartoon. This would be a beneficial text for undergraduate courses on Islam or the Middle East, since it is both accessible and tackles a popular art form that has almost universal appeal. (Daniel Martin Varisco, Hofstra University; author of Islam Obscured: The Rhetoric of Anthropological Representation Contemporary Islam, December 3, 2008)

More About the Author

Peter Gottschalk writes both about Islamophobia in the United States and about Hindu-Muslim relations in India. At the heart of his work is a fascination with the dynamics of cultural interpretation and conflict. He is interested particularly in understanding how assumptions of mutual antagonism form between groups despite evidence of commonalities.

Peter enjoys presenting on these topics and has discussed them in the U.S., Europe, Turkey, India, and Bangladesh at colleges and universities, professional conferences, public events, and religious communities. He has appeared on CNN, Voice of America, and National Public Radio, while his work has been mentioned in USA Today and the On Faith website of The Washington Post. His books have been reviewed, among other places, in The New York Times and The Times Literary Supplement.

Peter is Professor of Religion at Wesleyan University. He received his B.A. in History at the College of the Holy Cross, his M.A. in South Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and his Ph.D. in the History of Religions from the University of Chicago.

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Thomas V. Millington on December 31, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Ever since 9/11 I have been on the lookout for any book dealing with changed perceptions or heightened generalizations regarding Islam and Muslims. "Islamophobia" by Peter Gottschalk and Gabriel Greenberg is one of those books that must be read by Americans in this post-9/11 world.

This book starts off by reviewing the reaction of Muslims to the cartoon that appeared in the Danish news paper Jyllands-Posten, which portrayed the prophet Muhammad in a less than stellar light. From here the authors trace the depiction of Islam and Muslims throughout history and how this idea of the religion and its followers as backward, violent and primitive remains well-entrenched in the minds of many Western non-Muslim people. In the introduction, the authors make a statement that I think is right on target: That is they (views held by Americans) demonstrate how natural for so many Americans the image of Muslims as irrational aggressors and Americans as righteous innocents abroad and at home has become, so that any other perspective becomes not a counterargument but a challenge to an unquestionable world order." The authors skillfully present information to back up this statement.

From the history of Western perceptions of Islam, the authors go on to analyze political cartoons depicting Islams. Just before doing this they make a necessary distinction between caricature and stereotype. This is key, because I think for many people, caricatures and stereotypes are one and the same. Most people respond to visual stimuli and in the case of the cartoons, their lack of familiarity with Islam, coupled with a general post-9/11 resentment toward Muslim culture, allows them to formulate opinions based on the animations they read in the newspapers.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Edgar Hopida on August 21, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The new book Islamophobia: Making Muslims the Enemy by Peter Gottschalk and Gabriel Greenberg, is an excellent addition to the growing literature, study, and analysis of Islamophobia in the West. The authors give a working definition of what Islamophobia consists of in relation to other phobias in their introduction.

The first chapter deals with a very good but brief overview of Western interaction and reaction to Islamic civilization and Muslims. What is important to note is that this all came about way before 9/11 and that because of this long history, people in the West have an ingrained and often warped image about what the religion of Islam represents.

In this book, the focus is primarily the role of political cartoons in mainstream media that help shape everyday peoples' image of Islam and Muslims. The proceeding chapters give excellent examples of the imagery and effectiveness of conveying stereotypical images of Muslims and Islam.

For those interested in learning about Islamophobia, I recommend this book along with Dr. Mohamed Nimer's Islamophobia and Anti-Americanism: Causes and Remedies. For good essay on the topic, I recommend Dr. Ibrahim Kalin's essay entitled "Roots of Misconception: Euro-American Perceptions of Islam Before and After 9/11" which can be found online.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gderf on February 17, 2014
Format: Hardcover
The authors try to alleviate American fears of Islamic terrorism by showing, with history and cartoons, that that Islam and the West have more commonality than divergence. It's not convincing. Western anxiety is fueled by observation of the sources of terrorism, especially 9/11, as well as the Koranic exhortation to jihad. Superior features of Islam, including charity and culture are used as justification for a world Islamic order. There's no denying the role of Muslims in preserving Greek science and culture, or in propagating Indian science and mathematics. It's small comfort after 9/11. There is evident anti-Zionism, jealousy of the West and contempt of non Muslim life style. Polls show that Muslims largely applaud suicide bombers and celebrated the WTO debacle and the fall of the twin towers. Some writers, like Noam Chomsky, blame our own policies and lifestyle. The most prominent feature of the book is presentation of syndicated cartoons that tend to make Muslims the enemy of the West. Curiously, there are no cartoons for the opposing case. It seems to me that the message in the cartoons is more compelling that that of the text.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Billy M on January 9, 2014
Format: Hardcover
This book is probably the worst chronology of Islam I have ever read!
I have a number of colleagues and friends that have graduated from the "Cross".
They would be mortified by your "Political Correctness".
Let's see:
Do Islamists kill women for wanting education - YES!
Do Islamists rape women without penalty - YES!
Do Islamists kill journalists for criticizing Mohammed - YES!
Do Islamists kill Jewish journalists for no reason - YES!
Do Islamic countries allow Christian churches in their countries - NO!
Do Islamic countries allow American visitors whose Passport show an Israel stamp to visit - NO!
If it weren't for oil would anyone care - NO!
Go feed your camels!
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?