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The Island of Doctor Moreau Paperback – October 23, 2013

ISBN-13: 978-1619492332 ISBN-10: 1619492334

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 146 pages
  • Publisher: H.G. Books (October 23, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1619492334
  • ISBN-13: 978-1619492332
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #619,643 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

H. G. Wells was a professional writer and journalist, who published more than a hundred books, including novels, histories, essays and programmes for world regeneration. Wells's prophetic imagination was first displayed in pioneering works of science fiction, but later he became an apostle of socialism, science and progress. His controversial views on sexual equality and the shape of a truly developed nation remain directly relevant to our world today. He was, in Bertrand Russell's words, 'an important liberator of thought and action'.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kurt A. Johnson TOP 1000 REVIEWER on October 18, 2014
Format: Paperback
When Edward Prendick, an unfortunate shipwreck survivor, is plucked out of the ocean by the strange Dr. Montgomery, little does he know that he has dropped out of the frying pan and into the fire. When they arrive at their destination, Prendick finds that the whole island is filled with unnatural seeming people, and the least unnatural, but the most frightening is the lord and master of the island Dr. Moreau. There is a secret to this island, something terrifying, and Prendick is about to find out what it is, whether he wants to or not.

This book is one of the crowning examples of nineteenth century fantastic fiction. But, it is not merely an early science fiction story. Mr. Wells wrote this story as something of a lesson about scientists playing God, and creating monstrosities (not unlike Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein). This book is an exciting adventure story, with a fascinating lesson. Even though the book was written in 1896, it is still an exciting read, one that I highly recommend to you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JCStreetSoldier on June 23, 2012
Format: Paperback
Frankenstein is to resurrecting the dead as The Island of Dr. Moreau is to genetically splicing, or chimeras.

The premise is simple: A guy is the only survivor of a shipwreck and ends up on an island in which a doctor is genetically modifying animals and turning them into humanoids; and of course, at some point, the crap hits the fan. It's a very odd book but a classic in science fiction.

I admit that it's a hard book to read, until you get into the flow of things. But I can also say that without this book, there would be no Bioshock, no Resident Evil.
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By Mary Kohlas on January 31, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
GOOD READ , INTERESTING TO READ STORIES THAT HAVE BEEN MADE INTO MOVIES AND SEE THE DIFFERENCES. HOPE YOU ENJOY IT TOO.
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By Karen Rogers on May 31, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Purchased for another customer who collects books and movies. To my knowledge he is happy with this purchase so far.
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Format: Paperback
I haven't read a classic novel in a really long time, and so this was a little hard to get into at first. I mean, the premise is really interesting, and the story is great, but it's just... a classic. And after reading so much fast-paced YA, it was just really slow for me.

That's not to say I didn't enjoy it once I finally did get into it. I think for the time period it was written it, it was definitely a book that pushed limits and made the people of that generation really think. It has so many moral implications, and it kind of presents science as a really scary thing. In the 1800s, I'm sure it was scary.

I really love the way that H.G. Wells is able to bring science fiction to the masses. He did it with The War of the Worlds, The Time Machine, and pretty much all of his other books too. But this book takes place on Earth, with no alien invasions or anything. So it hits a little closer to home, and I can imagine that there were people who actually thought this was happening. Props, H.G. Wells, for making something that sounds so crazy seem so real.

I really enjoyed seeing everything from Prendick's point of view, because you can really see how Moreau and Montgomery change over the course of the novel. Moreau goes from being a crazy man to being more of a hero, and Montgomery devolves into a crazy man. And of course the beast creatures, who seem so human at first, revert back to their bestial natures and become more dangerous the longer they live. I thought it was really interesting that Wells would choose to give that characteristic to them; it's almost a social commentary on how, no matter how humanized people may seem, they can always become more beast than human.

I would definitely recommend this to any fan of H.G. Wells, and fans of science fiction.
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Format: Paperback
I first read this book when I was about 13, and I really liked it because of its unique story. Reading it again as an adult, I realize that I missed all the philosophical implications entirely.

The narrator of the novel, Edward Pendrick, is shipwrecked and alone in a small life-boat, when he is picked up by a freighter. Strange circumstances lead to his being left on a small island with an ex-medical student, who is prone to drunkenness, and Dr. Moreau, a disgraced scientists. Also on the island are various strange-looking "natives," who are almost animal-like in appearance.

It soon becomes apparent that Dr. Moreau has been performing bizarre experiments, transforming animals into a semblance of humanity, with the ability to walk upright and to speak. Unfortunately, they tend to revert to bestiality.

And what happens next? That suspense is the strength of this story. That and the very literate writing.

What did I miss the first time? I missed Well's suggestion that man is not so far from beast as he would like to think. The narrator says, "A strange persuasion came upon me that, save for the grossness of the line, the grotesqueness of the forms, I had before me the whole balance of human life in miniature, the whole interplay of instinct, reason, and fate, in its simplest form."

I really like this comment on the difference between man and beast: "An animal may be ferocious and cunning enough, but it takes a real man to tell a lie."

For those who have not yet read the book, but who have seen the movie(s), don't assume you even know the story, much less understand the implications. This novel may change the way you look at animals...and people.
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