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129 of 137 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Blu Ray review. . .
Thanks to my job I was able to get an early copy of the Criterion Blu Ray for Island of Lost Souls. There's not much to be said about the film that hasn't already been said. This adaptation of Wells "Island of Dr. Moreau" is one of the absolute pinnacles in the classic horror genre. One of the most notable things about this film is how much its tone contrasts with that of...
Published on October 19, 2011 by Garvinstomp

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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A POOR-QUALITY TRANSFER OF A BEAUTIFUL FILM
I bought this Criterion release of the 1932 Paramount film ISLAND OF LOST SOULS because I wanted to see a good digital transfer of a beautiful film and because I wanted to see if the DVD really has more footage than the MCA TV release. According to the Criterion blurb, this DVD version has some lines of dialogue that were cut from the camera negative under orders from...
Published on November 27, 2011 by Mark A. Vieira


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129 of 137 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Blu Ray review. . ., October 19, 2011
By 
Thanks to my job I was able to get an early copy of the Criterion Blu Ray for Island of Lost Souls. There's not much to be said about the film that hasn't already been said. This adaptation of Wells "Island of Dr. Moreau" is one of the absolute pinnacles in the classic horror genre. One of the most notable things about this film is how much its tone contrasts with that of the Universal horror movies of the same era. This film is far darker in its subject matter (vivisection, rape, bestiality) and has an overt air of sexuality that Universal films tended to stay away from. But enough about that, on to the disc itself.

The transfer itself really does stand with the best that Criterion has done. Anyone expecting a transfer clean of all dirt and scratches is setting themselves up for disappointment (and I can't imagine why anyone would want this film in that "clean" of a version, regardless). But this is the most pristine I've ever seen. It is superior to every other home video release by a wide margin. I doubt the film has looked this good since its original theatrical run. Although, my guess is that this is about the best format for the film. I wonder if a lot of these older films that have been restored will hold up when we get up to bigger formats in the future. My guess is most of them won't hold at a 3K or 4K resolution. But this is absolutely gorgeous.

What really struck me was the re-mastered mono track for the audio. It is some of the clearest I've heard from the era. So many times with movies from the 30s and 40s it sounds like the actors are speaking through two tin cans connected by a string. Here, the voices and effects are clear and ever present. Even though he's almost unrecognizable behind all the hair, Bela Lugosi's unmistakable accent comes across strong when he asks, "Are we not men?" Brilliant.

The extras are always a place where Criterion shines, and this is no exception. It's important to remember that the film is from 1933, so making-of documentaries and behind-the-scenes footage aren't to be expected. That means that Criterion had to create extra content with what is available here and now. The most notable of the extras is the discussion of the movie between director John Landis (An American Werewolf in London), Rick Baker (7x Oscar Winner for visual effects makeup, Wolf Man), and Bob Burns (horror collector/historian/super fan). I've had the pleasure of working with all three of these gentleman extensively and the thing that makes me happiest to see them here isn't the status of their celebrity, it's that all three of them are super fans. Talk for 15 minutes to any one of them and you'll realize that part of what makes them so good in their respective disciplines is that they know their history. This isn't just some celebs chatting about something that ends up being a testament to how brilliant they are. These three genuinely discuss the film, disagreeing on several points, and really get to the heart of why it has endured. It is really worth taking the time to watch (more than once).

The second extra that really adds to the disc is the commentary by Greg Mank. Again, I've had the pleasure of working with Greg on several occasions. This guy is one of the most knowledgeable horror historians on planet earth. The things he knows would make your head explode. When I heard that Criterion was doing this, his was the first name that popped into my head (partially because some of the work I've done with Greg centered on Lost Souls) because there really is no one better for the gig. He's fun. He's conversational. And you're going to gain an absolute wealth of knowledge and insight from listening to what he has to say.

There's also an interview with Richard Stanley, the man who was supposed to direct the Marlon Brando/Val Kilmer version of Moreau. But, he was let go before production began (lucky him). He's very frank about how he wanted to make the film, why he didn't, and just what a disaster the filmed version turned out to be. He even has some great stories about sneaking back onto the set just to see if it was as bad as the actors were telling him. But I think what I enjoyed most was his discussion of why Moreau is such a hard piece to adapt and what it would take to do it justice.

The last piece is an interview with the founding members of the band DEVO. It turns out that a lot of what they did was based off of the film and the book. Honestly, if you're not a fan of the band it's not a very engaging piece.

The bottom line is that this is the definitive version of LOST SOULS. It incorporates not only the best, but also some missing and rare, footage, making it the most complete version. It looks and sounds gorgeous and has an absolutely fantastic wealth of extras that will appeal to even the most educated horror aficionado. The film is a classic and has earned that moniker well. This edition finally allows it to shine and let the world see why it has remained as prominent as it has. Very highly recommended.

And if you don't find this review helpful, please just leave a comment and I'll be happy to expand on it.
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107 of 120 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last! . . ., August 8, 2011
By 
blue-59 (Blount Springs, Alabama, United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Island of Lost Souls (The Criterion Collection) (DVD)
I've been anticipating this release for years, so I'm glad to see it finally appear. The Paramount VHS version looked pretty darned good (for tape), so I have high hopes that the Criterion DVD has a top-quality source and will do this masterpiece justice. Definitely get the Blu-Ray version.

As for the movie itself, Laughton couldn't be better. He owns Dr. Moreau the way Sean Connery owns James Bond. No one could do effete aristocratic evil better than he.

Yes, the panther woman is made up to look a little nightclubby, and Stanley Fields (the drunken captain of the ship) and Paul Hurst (the garrulous captain of the rescue ship) ham it up a bit in their character parts, but was there ever a more terrifying scene than the one in which Richard Arlen first lays eyes on the animal-men?

I haven't seen every remake of this story, but the Burt Lancaster (1977) and Marlon Brando (1996) versions aren't in the same league. In fact, even without comparison to the Laughton version, both of them are pretty bad.

I've seen this film fifty times and look forward to watching it again when the disc arrives. I'll be sure to invite my dad, who saw it when it came out (at age 7) and now (at age 85) says no other movie ever filled him with such profound fear.

Look for the theological themes. It has only been in my more recent viewings that they manifest themselves so clearly to me.

Bela Lugosi should have won an Academy Award for his portrayal of the Sayer of the Law . . . "Are we not MEN?"
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59 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding Horror Classic - Thank You, Criterion!, August 24, 2011
By 
James Morris (Syracuse, NY United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Island of Lost Souls (The Criterion Collection) (DVD)
Several years ago, when I started to purchase DVD's, I decided that my VHS collection of 700 or so titles did not need to be replaced, and I would only buy DVD editions of films that I hadn't yet acquired. Right. A dozen years later, I have since replaced every VHS tape I had, with the exception of 40 or so films that have not yet made their way on to DVD. Of all the films I have left in my VHS collection, I have wished for the DVD release of none more than Island of Lost Souls. That this classic is finally being released by Criterion in a deluxe edition just makes my mouth water more in anticipation.

In 1932, Paramount Pictures made one of their few horror titles, Island of Lost Souls, based on the H. G. Wells classic, The Island of Dr. Moreau. Even today, the film emerges as an intelligent and extremely creepy exercise in unspeakable horror. One of Hollywood's sadly forgotten leading men, Richard Arlen, plays Edward Parker, a hapless traveler set adrift, who is rescued by a freighter delivering supplies to an island ruled by Dr. Moreau (Charles Laughton). After an argument with the ship's captain, Parker is stranded on the island, and the terror unfolds.

More of the plot should not be revealed to the uninitiated; let's just say that Bela Lugosi will surprise you with his amazing performance as Keeper of the Law and Charles Laughton, one of my favorite actors, was rarely better. When you learn the full secret of the island, the concept of the House of Pain and Lugosi's chant, "What is the Law?" will cause chills to run down your spine. The answers to Lugosi's chant, "Not to spill blood" and "Are we not men" are as downright creepy as films from this period get, especially in light of Dr. Moreau's unholy experiments.

The novel was filmed twice again in 1977 and 1996, both under the original title of The Island of Dr. Moreau. Many critics and horror fans agree that the 1932 version, with a screenplay by Science Fiction legend Philip Wylie (When Worlds Collide), still stands out as the clear choice, although I believe that both later versions had their merits, and were unfairly labeled as complete failures, in part because of the effectiveness of the original. In the genres of horror and science fiction, the original film has rarely been equaled in terms of atmosphere and sheer horror, and I am thrilled that it has finally made its way to a digital release.

Highly recommended.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Charles Laughton in one of the best Thirties horror films, September 29, 2002
By 
"Island of Lost Souls," the 1932 adaptation of H. G. Wells' "Island of Dr. Moreau," features Charles Laughton in one of the best mad scientist performances you are going to find. This is not the ranting mad genius personified by Colin Clive in "Frankenstein," but a much more tempered madman who provides less obvious hints as to his insanity. The story begins with Edward Parker (Richard Arlen) being rescued from the sea by the ship Covena, which is delivering animals in cages to Dr. Moreau's Island. After a fight with the ship's captain, Parker ends up on the island, where the good doctor takes his visitor into his home, after using his whip to scare away man-like creatures in the jungle. On his island retreat, Moreau has been experimenting with turning animals into creatures capable of speaking. With Parker on the island Moreau can find out if Lota (Kathleen Burke), who has been evolved from a panther, can bear a child. But when Parker discovers Moreau in his "house of pain," doing vivisection, the horrible truth of what is happening on the island comes out. Meanwhile, Parker's fiancé, Ruth (Leila Hyams), arrives looking for her beloved.
One of the most fascinating parts of this nightmarish film is how Moreau plays god with not only the bodies but also the minds of his creation. He has taught them "the law," which is not to walk on all fours and not to spill blood. As Bela Lugosi, playing the Sayer of the Law solemnly asks: "Are we not men?" It is when the animal-men come to a different answer to that question that "Island of Lost Souls" proves itself to be one of the best horror films of the 1930s. Director Erle C. Kenton does the most with the atmospheric setting, giving Laughton a perfect stage for his mad experiments. You will never recognize them, but both Buster Crabbe and Alan Ladd appear as beast men (yes, Randolph Scott is in the film, but he has a bit part as a "real" human). This story has been remade, as both uncredited versions (1959's "Terror Is a Man" and 1972's "The Twilight People") as well as under the novel's title in 1977, with Burt Lancaster as the title doctor, and again in 1996 with Marlon Brando. But with all things considered, "Island of Lost Souls" remains the best of the bunch, even though it offended the author. In fact, it was banned in England and parts of the United States (I assume because of the implied bestiality), which is always a strong recommendation that a horror film deserves to be checked out at least once.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "The natives are restless tonight!", April 13, 2001
By 
Robert S. Clay Jr. (St. Louis, MO., USA) - See all my reviews
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H. G. Wells' novel "The Island of Dr. Moreau" is the source for this exciting sci-fi/horror flick. Charles Laughton as Moreau prissily poses and preens as the mad doctor conducting forbidden experiments in vivisection, a variation of Frankenstein's theory of life and death. As a twisted god, he rules a remote tropical island populated by terrifying animal-man mutants, the failed results of his dark science. Into this menagerie of lost souls stumbles shipwrecked Edward Parker. Moreau has the insane idea to mate Parker to Lota, the delectable panther girl. Lota is Moreau's greatest success, and he wants to verify that she will react sexually to Parker (she does). By 1933 standards, Lota is the sexiest near human around. Her cat-like body movements and brief jungle attire add to her erotic appeal. Bela Lugosi, as a wolf man with a thick accent, is eerily effective as the "Sayer of the Law." His plaintive wailing and drawn out syllables raise the hackles as this jungle Moses articulates "the law" before Moreau. The scary make-up of the animal men conveys dread and fear nicely. The night scenes in the steaming jungle of huge bonfires surrounded by hellish shambling creatures are the stuff of troubled dreams. Moreau's island is Dante's Inferno retold. Things get very grim when the animal men revolt. As the animal men howl and growl in the distance, in a side-splitting moment of unintended humor, Moreau utters that great cliche of old movies: "The natives are restless tonight!" The movie is competently directed by Erle C. Kenton who went on to direct some of Universal's best horror movie programmers. Relax and enjoy the thrills. ;-)
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Probably The Best Horror Film Ever Made" - Michael Weldon, September 5, 2011
This review is from: Island of Lost Souls (The Criterion Collection) (DVD)
Crappy versions of this creepy masterpiece have been around forever; my VHS copy is a woeful thing. The best I'd seen was a 35mm print at the Smithsonian back in the 90s, but there's never been a good DVD version available-- until now. Given Criterion's reputation for quality, here's what we've been waiting for. IMHO, this is one of the indispensable movies of the early thirties, and joins Bride of Frankenstein, Freaks, and Vampyr as the best of the best in cinematic horror.

Even if you've never seen this, you know about it: it's a constant source of references in other works, most of them comedic. The Simpsons have based several of their "Treehouse of Horrors" episodes on it, and Oingo Boingo's song "No Spill Blood" is based on it.

H. G. Wells thought it was vulgar, but for my money it's better than his book. It was banned for more than thirty years in Britain due to the vivisection theme. Charles Laughton is BRILLIANT as Moreau, and his joy at playing such an irredeemably evil man is infectious. Kathleen Burke as Lota is undeniably sexy... but then, I'm a cat fancier.

If you've never seen this, you have a treat in store! Warning: it's almost 80 years old, but still not for the kiddies. It's nightmare fodder for those under 10, so have a care....
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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A POOR-QUALITY TRANSFER OF A BEAUTIFUL FILM, November 27, 2011
By 
Mark A. Vieira (Downtown Los Angeles, CA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Island of Lost Souls (The Criterion Collection) (DVD)
I bought this Criterion release of the 1932 Paramount film ISLAND OF LOST SOULS because I wanted to see a good digital transfer of a beautiful film and because I wanted to see if the DVD really has more footage than the MCA TV release. According to the Criterion blurb, this DVD version has some lines of dialogue that were cut from the camera negative under orders from Joseph I. Breen and the Production Code Administration (PCA) before it could be reissued in the mid-1930s. I know both the film and its soundtrack quite well. I've seen it numerous times since the 1960s, recorded the soundtrack onto audio tape, and have owned a 16mm print of the film for about ten years. I'd be able to recognize an unfamiliar line of dialogue quite readily.

[To clarify: when MCA bought ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (and 700 other Paramount pre-1948 features) for TV release in 1958, they made a fine-grain positive from each nitrate camera negative, and then made a 16mm TV negative from that. So the fine-grain and the 16mm TV prints have the same running time as the film's general release; ditto for the video shown on AMC in the 1980s.]

The liner notes on the Criterion ISLAND OF LOST SOULS DVD say that it was authored primarily from the nitrate Paramount vault print --- because that element has a few lines of dialogue that were cut for reissue. This makes no sense. The film was not reissued. It had too much trouble with the censors (see my book SIN IN SOFT FOCUS), so Joe Breen would not approve a reissue. And if it was not being reissued, there was no reason for Paramount to cut its camera negative. That's what happened to THE SIGN OF THE CROSS, A FAREWELL TO ARMS, LOVE ME TONIGHT, and many others; their camera negatives were cut for reissue---and the trims were thrown away.

The news: it does appear that the nitrate vault print of ISLAND OF LOST SOULS contains a couple of lines of dialogue that were later trimmed. One is a sentence spoken by Dr. Moreau (Charles Laughton) about a woman's emotions. In my estimation, the cuts must have been made between the 1932 preview and the 1933 general release, most likely under orders from the PCA's predecessor, the Studio Relations Committee. Strange but true.

I'd like Criterion to explain why they couldn't tell us what these cut-and-then-restored sentences were, either on the package or in the liner notes. I guess Criterion thinks it's okay to use elements like that as a come-on for film buffs, but doesn't think it's necessary to say what the elements are. (Maybe this information is in the audio commentary; okay, I'll listen to it, but I still think it should be more accessible.)

As you know, the DVD isn't cheap. But, despite all the tinkering and digital clean-up work, the image is poor. There's no reason that it should be. These are NOT the best surviving elements. The fine-grain positive would have made a superb transfer. Look at the Universal DVD releases of other 1932 films: NO MAN OF HER OWN, NIGHT AFTER NIGHT, LOVE ME TONIGHT, THIS IS THE NIGHT, MERRILY WE GO TO HELL, and BLONDE VENUS. These beautiful DVDs were all authored from the 1958 fine-grains. This ISLAND OF LOST SOULS transfer was supposedly made from the nitrate vault print, but it looks like it was made from a dupe negative. If you've ever been lucky enough to see nitrate, you know it's not grainy and contrasty. The previous transfer of this film--the one that was shown on AMC--was better than this.

If you've been unlucky enough to have bought the Criterion release of THE SCARLET EMPRESS and then seen the film on TCM or in the Region 2 DVD release, you will share my resentment. The Criterion DVD looks terrible --- grainy and contrasty. That's because it was made, not from the fine-grain, but from a poor-quality dupe negative that was created during a vaunted 1980s "preservation." On the other hand, the transfer of THE SCARLET EMPRESS used in the TCM and Region 2 presentations was made from the fine-grain; it is absolutely beautiful.

We can't blame Universal. We can blame Criterion. They could have gotten the fine-grain positive of ISLAND OF LOST SOULS from Universal, but someone at Criterion thought that the dupe negative would make better pre-print material for the DVD authoring, probably because it was generated during another high-priced "preservation." Who knows who made that awful dupe neg? Not Universal. I've seen the preservation work that Universal has done on black-and-white nitrate films like MURDER AT THE VANITIES and THE RIGHT TO LOVE. It's superb. (I'm qualified to make this statement, having been a black-and-white lab technician since 1969.)

What a shame that Criterion didn't use the proper pre-print material for ISLAND OF LOST SOULS. This film deserves the best. I don't care how nice the packaging is and how many Extras the DVD has. The print doesn't look good, which is a shame, considering the beauty of the film's images. And most people will look at the DVD and believe that movies made in 1932 didn't look any better than this. I hope YOU don't!
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19 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars That is the law! Are we not men?, March 9, 2003
The earliest and best H.G. Wells' adaptations is Island Of Lost Souls, based on The Island of Dr. Moreau. After being rescued from a lifeboat by the S.S. Covena, Edward Parker ends up on an island run by the mysterious Dr. Moreau and his assistant Montgomery. The Covena was delivering some animals, mostly dogs, for Moreau.
The island also has some pretty strange natives, who are hirsute and barely human. Fortunately, Moreau has a whip that scares them off. Apart from Moreau, Montgomery, and M'ling the servant, there's Lota, a ravishing young girl whom Moreau introduces to Parker. He is curious as to their interractions, as he secretly observes them.
The natives also have a strange ritual. Moreau asks them "What is the law?" To which they reply "Not to eat meat. That is the law. Are we not men?" And other replies. The leader of the natives says of Moreau: "His is the hand that makes/His is the hand that heals/His is the house of pain." Those who have read the book will know what's going on, but does not exactly follow it, as is the case with most future Moreau adaptations.
Charles Laughton plays Moreau in a variety of shades, far from the typical mad scientist. He's refined, reserved in speech (for the most part), and cunning. His smile, and that weird twinkle in his eyes lends the hint to his (Laughton's) homosexuality, but his performance here demonstrates why Hollywood decided to protect him.
Richard Arlen plays Parker as a bit of an uptight and conventional prude, and Leila Hyams as his fiancee Ruth is a perfect match for him.
Kathleen Burke is a wonder as Lota--pity she didn't appear in that many films. She gives a sensitive, sympathetic portrayal, speaking in a soft, child-like voice. If I were Parker, I'd dump Ruth for Lota anyday.
Bela Lugosi is barely recognizable in furry makeup as the leader of the natives, but once one sees those unmistakable eyes... one instantly recognizes the man who lost his identity playing Dracula ad nauseum. And whoever played the giant Ouran did so with great menace.
As this was made before the Hays Code, some of the scenes and implied dialogue on the island is strong for that era. That this was initially banned in many countries and in some parts of the U.S. is not surprising. Pity they don't make movies like this anymore, because it stands heads over many.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Original is Always the Best, September 30, 1999
By A Customer
Erle C. Kenton brings H. G. Wells' novel to life in "Island of Lost Souls." It is the story of a mad scientist on a remote island that transforms animals into half-human abominations. Through medical procedures he slowly turns animals to resemble a human form. Dr. Moreau's control over his creations is soon lost and a rebellion takes place. While the others escape Dr. Moreau does not and receives a taste of his own medicine. The film was of tremendous quality. Charles Laughton illustrates to the audience the insanity of this mad scientist and his quest to feeling like God. He does this by the way he shows the emotion of the character, with his quick mood swings of being violent to calm. Béla Lugosi also makes a great appearance as the "Sayer of the Law" who is one of the creatures Dr. Moreau created. He along with the other beast does a good job of acting as animals formed to function like humans. The beasts acted as they should, only having few words and fraises to guide their lives by such as "are we not men?'' The special effect where a great asset to the quality of this film. The make-up of the creatures was spectacular. Adding a lot of realism to the film. Also the sets were something to admire. An entire house that contained enormous plants formed from the Doctors experiments. There were many jungle scenes among other scenes to make this secret island come to life. The dark lighting also greatly added to the mood and suspense of the movie. With a fabulous story, wonderful acting, spectacular scenes and special effects Island of Lost Souls is a great film to view.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A PRE-CODE MACABRE MASTERPIECE, October 27, 2011
By 
Casey62 (Chicago, Illinois) - See all my reviews
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Among all the classic horror films produced in that remarkable period during the early '30's, Paramount's ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (1932), surely remains as one of the most potent in terms of both subject matter and style.

The story concerns a scientist conducting surgical experiments on animals in an attempt to transform them into human beings. Adapted from H.G. Wells' book, "The Island of Dr. Moreau", this film version is unanimously considered to be the best - there were two subsequent remakes in 1977 and 1996. The premise has been re-worked in many films; most notably in TERROR IS A MAN (1959).

ISLAND OF LOST SOULS was directed by Erle C. Kenton, who is known primarily as a competent enough director of B-films. This superbly crafted work is the exception. Kenton excels in his handling of the Philip Wylie/Waldemar Young script by keeping the pace brisk (the film runs just 70 minutes), and by sustaining a genuine aura of eeriness and suspense. The bravura cinematography by Karl Struss is rich with ominous, expressionistic shadows and yet is sensuously lush at the same time.

Charles Laughton's underplayed portrayal of Dr. Moreau is the most twisted mad scientist ever, and is definitely one of this great actor's finest performances. Richard Arlen is perfect as the bewildered castaway who challenges the doctor's unethical goals. The film also benefits by the strong presence of two lovely female characters: Leila Hyams, who is very Fay Wray-ish as Arlen's fiancee, and Kathleen Burke as the Panther Woman, Moreau's most near-perfect creation. Burke in particular is touching and tragic; the most lost of all the souls on the forsaken island. In a truly fearsome role, Bela Lugosi - sporting terrific hirsute makeup - scores high as the inwardly as well as outwardly tortured "Sayer of the Law" and leader of the mutant beast-men. The makeup effects in the creation of Moreau's unfortunate "manimals" was among the most innovative of the era.

The blu-ray of this bona-fide classic was transferred off the finest elements from three sources: a 35mm fine-grain positive, a 35mm nitrate positive, and a 16mm print. The result is a fabulous looking film, the finest it's ever likely to look - and sound. The audio is clean, clear, and crisp. The great opening title music, played over splashing waves that reveal the credits, is restored in all its moody ambience. And, speaking of music, it's noteworthy that this film contains none - except for the brief cues at the beginning and end titles - yet it doesn't suffer in the least dramatically for lack of a score.

This much welcome edition from Criterion contains an illustrated booklet with an essay by Christine Smallwood. The special features include an engaging commentary by historian Gregory Mank, a conversation between director John Landis, makeup artist Rick Baker, and collector Bob Burns. There are also interviews with writer/historian David Skal, Richard Stanley, director of the inferior '96 remake, and members of the band Devo, including their musical short film from 1976. The original theatrical trailer and a stills gallery wrap up the extras.

Fans of ISLAND OF LOST SOULS know just what a cherished release this is. For others interested in tracking down the finest classic horror films, this one's a no-brainer. See it - "that is the Law."
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