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Island No. 10: Struggle for the Mississippi Valley Paperback – April 30, 1996

ISBN-13: 978-0817308162 ISBN-10: 0817308164 Edition: 1st Edition

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Island No. 10: Struggle for the Mississippi Valley + Mr. Lincoln's Brown Water Navy: The Mississippi Squadron (The American Crisis Series: Books on the Civil War Era)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: University Alabama Press; 1st Edition edition (April 30, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0817308164
  • ISBN-13: 978-0817308162
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,649,723 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By James W. Durney TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 31, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Island No. 10 is always there but never really part of the story. It happens off to the East if you are reading about the Trans-Mississippi. It happens off the West when you are reading a book on Shiloh. When you read about Forts Henry & Donelson, they clear the way for it to happen and it had to happen to allow the Vicksburg Campaign. If you read about the 1862 campaigns in Virginia, Island No. 10 makes Pope into McClellan's chief rival. Setting up all the questions about Second Manassas and did or did not the AOP with hold troops allowing Pope to be defeated. In 1862, Island No. 10 is one event that seems to be included in every story but is not important enough to be a story. We all know about it but we lack knowledge of the campaign falling into the always their but never central to the story.

With no large battles or star players, it is easy to see how this happened. Pope's reputation is destroyed in six months and Foote dies within a year canceling the Union leaders. The Confederacy never commits a major player to the defense of the island. After surrendering, reputations destroyed; captured and imprisoned the commanders are relegated to minor positions when exchanged.

This small book covers the actions of both sides as they struggle for control of a critical position on the Mississippi River. Island No. 10 is the tenth island south of the Ohio River and a key defensive position in stopping the northern advance from Cairo. Generals Polk, AS Johnston and Beauregard all had other things on their mind and the island was never a primary position. We are given an excellent but concise understand of the "bigger issues" caused this to happen. When Union General Pope took New Madrid, he cut the position off from most river traffic.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Michael E. Fitzgerald on September 12, 2004
Format: Paperback
In 1862 Island No. 10, so named because it was the tenth island south of the junction of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers at Cairo, Illinois, was a natural fortress 1 mile long and 450 yards wide. It was shallow, 10 feet above low water, in the middle of the channel, and straddled the boundaries of the states of Tennessee, Kentucky and Missouri. It was an ideal site from which the Confederates could maintain control of both rivers, effectively choking all northern river traffic and thus the export of all Union production north of these rivers as far east as today's West Virginia. It was a critical site indeed.

But in March and early April of 1862, the combined Union army and navy launched a campaign for command of the Island No. 10, which became the site of the first extensive seige of the Civil War. Success here launched the elevation of General John Pope to command of the Army of the Potomac and set the stage for the Union's subsequent disaster at second Manassas. But this engagement also demonstrated the strength of Union control in the Mississippi River Valley and set the stage for the Union's ultimate triumph at Vicksburg and the opening of the Mississippi River system over a year later.

An often mentioned yet overlooked Mississippi River battle, Larry J. Daniel and Lynn N. Bock render an excellent analysis of this key, early Civil War Union victory.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By CTS 2631 on December 6, 2009
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Until I read this book the campaign for Island Number 10 was always a side show to whatever other campaign I was reading about. This short volume by Larry J. Daniel and Lynn N. Bock describes in detail the Union Campaign to open the upper Mississippi in early 1862. The overland campaign led by Union General John Pope to capture New Madrid, Missouri, downriver from Island Number 10, and Flag Officer Andrew Foote's naval campaign to lay seige to the Island are thoroughly explained without getting too bogged down in the details, as well as the final combined push to capture the Confederate forts and garrison. The history is told from both sides of the campaign with equal attention to the leaders, soldiers and sailors, and civilians on both sides. I liked the writing style and it was easy to keep track of all the action and principal players. This is the only volume I could find on this campaign and I was not disappointed. I enjoyed reading it, learned a lot of things I didnt know and got a better understanding of things I wasnt too sure about. (like how John Pope got so much notoriety that he ended up getting shipped to Virginia to command a Union army that got thrashed by Lee) The maps are good. Lots of pictures and illustrations. This is a must have volume for understanding one of the opening moves in the campaign to open the Mississippi. Highly reccomended.
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Several years ago in doing genealogy research on my family I encountered local documentation from Clinton County, Ohio, where it stated that my Great great grandfather had been wounded in the hand during this battle that took place on an island No. 10 in the Mississippi. In a quick google look the island no longer exists, so I felt I reached a dead end of sorts until a Civil War buff mentioned that this book was available. The book is very thorough and well documented. It presents the story and the surrounding importance very well, so that I now have a clear picture of that event and a closer understanding of the event and experience.
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