Island of Shattered Dreams and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Island of Shattered Dreams Paperback – January 1, 2007


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.00 $12.84
Year-End%20Deals%20in%20Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 163 pages
  • Publisher: Huia Pub.; 1 edition (January 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1869692993
  • ISBN-13: 978-1869692995
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,045,165 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
I read Island of Shattered Dreams for a Pacific Literature class at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.
Melissa
Generations of complex love and lustful unforbidden love, mixed races, half-bloods, social issues and cross culture create a multifaceted collection of events.
Kawailani
The way she mixes poetry into her stories deepens the meanings and creates beautiful and intense imagery.
Rachel

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Coote on January 10, 2009
Format: Paperback
I first read this book in French and was delighted to find that it translated very lyrically into English. Island of Shattered Dreams is always billed as the first novel by an indigenous Ma'ohi writer in French Polynesia. Given that it was written only in 1991 this is ample evidence that fictional literature is a very recent genre among the country's indigenous population. But this is a most accomplished beginning which, not surprisingly, has become the benchmark for Ma'ohi authors since then, and has spurned a new wave of local writing about the reality of life for Polynesians on the Territory. Much of this writing is by women.
Maevarua and Teuira Tetanui and their children lead an idyllic life on their tranquil Pacific Island as have many generations before them. But when a French soldier arrives in their village to speak to the islanders of an emergency everything changes. The `motherland' was under serious threat from Germany and was calling on its sons to come and fight. Many young men of the island, not understanding where the motherland - or Germany - was, nevertheless saw an opportunity to travel and see the world, much to the distress of their families. Most did not return. However, Tematua, son of Maevarua and Teuira did come back safely but was never to talk about his experiences during the War. On his return he falls in love with the beautiful Emere, daughter of an English father and Ma'ohi mother, and it is their (slightly idealised - all of them are beautiful and brilliant) life together and those of their children, Terii, Eritapeta and Tetiare, that forms the foundation of the book. Then, twenty years on, the second bombshell (literally) is announced: that their land was to be requisitioned by the state for nuclear testing on the grounds of state security and defence.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Eric Sung on December 12, 2013
Format: Paperback
Chantal Spitz brilliantly connects the multi-generational story of one family with the larger narrative of French-occupied Polynesia. The rips and pulls that wrack the family—in the form of interracial relations, foreign influence and education, the rejection of tradition—serve as a lens to the wider problems that their country faces, such as the burgeoning demographic of half-bloods, imported militarization and academic systems, and the gradual forcing out of culture and language by the encroaching French government. Spitz’s ability to balance the story of a family with that of a nation, without one narrative crowding out or hammering down on the other, is seamless and extremely commendable.
To preface, this book is not a one-sided attack on colonialism but a passionate and complicated story that involves the desires, ambitions, and personalities of individual lives. A one-sided attack would have erased the individuality of these characters, both indigenous and French. At one point, the grandmother of one of the young characters tells her that these supposedly devilish colonizers actually don’t do it on purpose, but simply act without thinking. Several indigenous Polynesians, or Ma’ohi, are implicated as well throughout the story for their covetous desire for all things foreign and exotic or for their willing disremembering of the past. Nevertheless, all actions in the book, whether good or bad, are ultimately tied to passion and love, whether it be a love for resources or for one’s children. Though originally written in French, this book’s style and tone is distinctly Ma’ohi, with its long-flowing lines and caressing balladry.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition
Reading this novel was an absolutely beautiful experience that brought me so much knowledge on so many aspects of the Pacific. It is a story that conveys the hardships of knowing where one belongs as they move away from their homeland, a story of love and genealogy, and a story that shows in depth the relationship between the colonizers and the colonized. The experiences that are expressed within Chantal Spitz's novel gives readers a vivid sense of everything that went on -- a better sense than any text book can give in my opinion! Spitz discusses the papa'a (white people) and their affect on the Pacific people which is especially effective when reading it as a papa'a myself. Many see Spitz as an angry Pacific Islander because of the ay she speaks but really she is speaking for what she loves and she is coping with the rough stuff she and many others must go through. The way she mixes poetry into her stories deepens the meanings and creates beautiful and intense imagery. This novel is incredibly unique and hits so many emotions, I can't help but love it. It really makes you think! Read it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?