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It Don't Bother Me Import


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Audio CD, Import, February 26, 2008
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Vinyl, Import, August 19, 2003
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 26, 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Sanctuary UK
  • ASIN: B00005AFML
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #213,135 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Oh My Babe
2. Ring-A-Ding Bird
3. Tinkers Blues
4. Anti Apartheid
5. The Wheel
6. A Man Id Rather Be
7. My Lover
8. It Don't Bother Me
9. Harvest Your Thoughts of Love
10. Luckt Thirteen
11. As the Day Grows Longer Now
12. So Long (Been on the Road So Long)
13. Want My Daddy Now
14. 900 Miles

Editorial Reviews

UK reissue of the influential British folk artist's sophomore album, originally released in 1965. 14 tracks including, 'Anti Apartheid' & 'Lucky Thirteen'. The CD housed in a slipcase comes with a 12 page booklet with informative sleevenotes. 2001 release.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By C. H Smith on October 28, 2001
Format: Audio CD
This, Jansch's second album, followed the landmark first's release by less than a year, still in 1965. It pretty much represents a continuation of the first, though here he plays a couple of works with John Renbourn on second guitar (the exotic North African-sounding vocal piece 'My Lover,' and the incredible instrumental 'Lucky Thirteen'), and the traditional piece '900 Miles,' on which he shows that he can play the banjo as well as the guitar. Other high points include the interesting solo instrumental 'The Wheel,' the chilling commentary title cut, and the more lighthearted 'As the Day Grows Longer Now.' Be ready for a couple of cuts that are not so strong, however. Still, with perhaps one more strong cut this release most likely would have had nearly the same effect as its predecessor had it been released first. Together, these two albums added to Davy Graham's pioneer work in setting the context for the notion of the "contemporary acoustic guitarist." For Jansch, in the next year it would be on to the beginnings of British folk-rock, with the albums "Jack Orion" and "Bert and John," and shortly thereafter, the coming together of Pentangle.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By "nickelcandy" on July 24, 2000
Format: Audio CD
too often the cheesy pop world drags me down and under: passionless vocals, over production, and dumbed down keyboard hooks designed to sell some big labels latest package. i am glad to say that bert jansch is the antithesis to the sugar sweet radio candy gumming up so many peoples ears. his heart felt singing (with that classic-folk-tenor-throaty-break), mind-blowing guitar playing, and cutting delivery add up to an undeniably brilliant musician and album. repeat: MIND BLOWING GUITAR PLAYING. everything about bert jansch is so stunningly original -there is no one in the world who plays like him- and his list of devoted followers speaks for itself: jimmy page, johnny marr, bernard butler, jarvis cocker, neil young, etc. bert jansch is a living legend, and i strongly encourage anyone, young and old, who appreciates music with real soul and talent to check out any bert jansch you can get your hands on. note to musicians: this mans music is an absolute must in your collection.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. H Smith on September 24, 2000
Format: Audio CD
"It Don't Bother Me" was Jansch's second album, released originally in 1965 on the old Transatlantic label. It was apparently recorded on a small portable tape recorder, under very intimate circumstances, and with no accompanying musicians (except his buddy John Renbourn on a couple of cuts). This present issue is actually not the original lineup of songs, which is a good thing because there were two or three duds on it, and the extra material more than makes up for them. The original was a continuation of his epoch-making first album; this compilation brings in material from the shortly thereafter recorded "Bert and John" (called "Stepping Stones" in the U.S.). My favorite cuts here are 'Soho,' 'Lucky Thirteen,' and 'My Lover,' but ask twenty different people and you'd get twenty different answers.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Elliot Knapp on August 19, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It Don't Bother Me is Jansch's second solo album, released in 1965. It also marks his first two collaborations with guitarist John Renbourn (they'd later form the fantastic guitar nucleus of the Pentangle) on "My Lover" and "Lucky Thirteen." Most reviews of It Don't Bother Me refer to the album as a repeat or continuation of his first. In all reality, though, most of Bert Jansch's albums are continuations of his first (give or take a few traditional tunes and the presence or absence of a rhythm section), which is just alright for most of his fans; inimitable fingerpicked acoustic guitar anchoring earnest originals often accompanied by Jansch's gruff but listenable vocals. Most listeners are so intoxicated by Jansch's guitar work (myself included) that this album's similarity to his debut isn't a reason not to buy it.

It Don't Bother Me is a bit better-produced than the debut, but it doesn't matter too much, since it's acoustic guitar and vocals with zero overdubs. The opening track is a slight change of pace, sounding a little bit more like flatpicked guitar than most of his songs. "Ring-a Ding Bird" is one of the most progressive tracks on the album, with a surprising minor-key middle section that may reveal where David Gilmour found "inspiration" for a suspiciously similar passage in "A Pillow of Winds," from Pink Floyd's Meddle. "Anti Apartheid" and "It Don't Bother Me" are probably the album's most memorable tracks. The first is, as the title suggests, a very straightforward protest song, which fortunately doesn't subtract too much from the weight of its message.
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