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It Never Snows in September: The German View of Market Garden and the Battle of Arnhem, September 1944 Hardcover – September 21, 1996


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 364 pages
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press (September 21, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1885119313
  • ISBN-13: 978-1885119315
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 7.2 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #676,319 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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It is one of the best books on Market-Garden I have read and gets my highest recommendation.
Tony Marquise Jr.
The excellent maps and numerous photos, some not published before, make this a must have book for the historian or anybody interested in this battle.
Aussie Reader
Kershaw's book details the Battle for Arnhem and associated actions of the Allies Operation Market-Garden from the German perspective.
Mannie Liscum

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Barron Laycock HALL OF FAME on August 16, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The critical difference employed in this book about Operation Market Garden is its use of the German perspective regarding the fabled and fatefully miscalculated Allied assault in the fall of 1944 in an vainglorious attempt to grab and hold several bridges leading into Germany. This book by British author Robert J. Kershaw retelling the oft-told tale of the momentous Allied miscalculation of potential German resistance and the speed with which the Allied armored forces could proceed up the one road needed to support and sustain the airdropped forces is a riveting tale. Like the most famous book yet published (a new book on the subject is due out this fall) it graphically describes the total cost in terms of human life and unnecessary destruction. This is a story told at every level, but concentrating on the faithful recollections of the German participants in the action. Thus, the reader is swept into the action to get a voyeur's view of the moment-to-moment development of the story as it unfolds to the Wehrmacht's amazement in all its horrific detail.
The title refers to a German soldier's observation of the white parachutes suddenly filling the morning sky over Arnhem; since it never snows in September, the soldier instantly realized it must mean an invasion. As mentioned above, the preponderance of attention is paid to the recollections and experiences of the German armed forces, although these are balanced with liberal sprinklings of noncombatants and Allied observations.
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33 of 33 people found the following review helpful By M. Hawash on September 15, 1998
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A fine addition to the literature about the doomed MARKET-GARDEN campaign. Kershaw does a fantastic job of gathering together information that no other MARKET-GARDEN historian has been able to do --- a knock by knock account from the German side.
The photographs that Kershaw has put in the book are amazing. Most of the photographs I have never seen before. The combat photographs are fantastic. It is rare that photographs and history blend together so well in a serious scholarly text. The book will delight any student of the MARKET-GARDEN operation.
A few words of warning. First, the book does not examine the Allied point of view at all. In fact, the book basically assumes that the reader will be familiar with the major Allied players and their objectives (ex. the book often refers to Col. John Frost's men at Arnhem bridge -- however, the book never really explains who Frost is). Given that book is probably written for people interested in the subject-matter, this criticism is minor.
Also, Kershaw's prose is not like Stephen Ambrose fo Citizen Soldiers fame. Kershaw is not a writer by trade. Nevertheless, Kershaw's personalized treatment of events will keep the reader captivated from page 1 until the epilogue.
When I picked up IT NEVER SNOWS IN SEPTEMBER it had been a while since I read a MARKET-GARDEN book. Therefore, I read Kershaw's book and Cornelius Ryan's A BRIDGE TOO FAR back to back. Wow. What a double-header that was!
Bottom line: highly recomended.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Mitch Reed on October 18, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For those who are interested in a in depth work about MARKET-GARDEN, this book is for you. While Ryan's "A Bridge Too Far" covers the whole battle from all points, this book tells the German story. While books like "Arhnem", and "Poles Apart" cover the British and Polish views, this book only tells the tale of the Germans. While one cannot grasp the whole battle from this book, it is a great follow up for the serious reader. The Germans where made up of rag-tag units thrown together quickly, yet beat a crack Airborne Army. This is a must read....
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Van Scyoc on August 1, 2003
Format: Hardcover
For anyone interested in a comprehensive understanding of how the Market Garden campaign was fought by the German forces, this book is essential. It provides a thorough analysis of the units that fought the battle, their individual strengths and compositions, in addition to the roles they played in the actions at Arnhem, Nijmegen, and other sectors of fighting.
Kershaw's book is concise and objective. He clearly illustrates the actions fought, and draws sound conclusions on how and why German successes were achieved, as well as failiures. It is one of the best chronicles of battle at the Kampfgruppe level that this reader has encountered.
Numerous personal recollections are drawn upon, enlivening the academic recital of operational details. It is also supported by a generous selection of maps and photos that complement the text.
Detailed and very readable at the same time, it must rank among the foremost works on the battle for the crucial bridges targeted in Market Garden.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Mannie Liscum on April 16, 2003
Format: Hardcover
While Robert Kershaw's "It Never Snows in September" doesn't read like C. Ryan's "A Bridge Too Far", it is a wonderful complement and serious study. Kershaw's book details the Battle for Arnhem and associated actions of the Allies Operation Market-Garden from the German perspective. As such this book is in many way the mirror image of Ryan's book, told from the Allied side of the fence. Where "A Bridge Too Far" is wonderful literature on its own right, independent of its value as a historical work, "It Never Snows" is a more difficult read from a pure reading pleasure standpoint but is a WONDERFUL historical treatise. Kershaw uses both historical documents and first hand accounts from interviews of surviving German soldiers to weave an intricate story of the German's surprise to Market and subsequent response to Market and Garden that ultimately stop dead the push Monty thought could go all the way to the Ruhr and beyond to Berlin. While there are no real surprises in terms of the battle perspectives themselves the vantage point provided from looking back at the Allies rather than the traditional way (we Americans) look out at the Axis armies is very refreshing. Another aspect of "It Never Snows" that makes it a really nice piece of work is its thorough documentation of the 2nd SS Panzer Corps' role that was critical to the German blunting of Market-Garden. "It Never Snows" is possible one of the most thorough studies of the 2nd SS (aside from Michael Reynold's "Sons of the Reich") out there that is also enjoyable to read.
Certainly "It Never Snows In September" is not written a la Ryan or Ambrose - so if you need your history slick and stylish this is probably not for you - but it is readable and fun to read.
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