Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Ithaqua Cycle (Call of Cthulhu Fiction) Paperback – December 1, 1997


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, December 1, 1997
$15.25 $15.00

Frequently Bought Together

The Ithaqua Cycle (Call of Cthulhu Fiction) + The Nyarlathotep Cycle: Stories about the God of a Thousand Forms (Chaosium fiction) + The Hastur Cycle: 13 Tales of Horror Defining Hastur, the King in Yellow, Yuggoth, and the Dread City of Carcosa (Call of Cthulhu Fiction)
Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Call of Cthulhu Fiction
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Chaosium, Inc. (December 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1568821247
  • ISBN-13: 978-1568821245
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,754,738 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
3
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Alexander Scott on March 13, 2005
Format: Paperback
If you are reading this right now, you owe August Derleth a debt of gratitude. That is, if you enjoy Lovecraftian fiction, it is probably due to Derleth's efforts to keep it in print and widely read. This is certainly an inestimable service and one for which I appreciate him greatly.

His writing is another matter entirely.

This collection starts off with one of the best weird stories ever, "The Wendigo" by Algernon Blackwood. A deadly creature in the Canadian hinterland issues a siren call, summoning those who hear it to run alongside it in the air, and in the process, stealing the hearer's humanity. This concept is brought to life by atmospheric detail and ruminations on the cowering of men's souls when confronted with the vastness of the unknowable North. This is a masterpiece, recognized even by HP Lovecraft himself.

The next three stories are Derleth's work. Perhaps something about the Wendigo legend caught his fancy - perhaps he just saw an opening to be exploited. In any case, he created a mythos deity "Ithaqua" to be part of the Lovecraft pantheon that would fulfill the duties of the wendigo spirit. His first two stories in this book are the same, "The Thing that Walked on the Wind" and "The Snow Thing". They deal with "cultus interruptus", intruding on a deity's private worship and incurring that wrath. But of course, the trespasser has enough time to write a testimony before being gathered into the great beyond. These are certainly not his worst work; "Beyond the Threshold" would give that title a run for its money. Derleth descends to a new low in pulpishness while shilling for his own publishing press - THE OUTSIDER AND OTHERS is mentioned along with fan-favorite mythos tome THE NECRNOMICON as a source of forbidden knowledge. Why?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Morticroo on April 15, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This collection, like most of Chaosium's (insert Mythos name) Cycle books, starts with a series of stories exploring the genesis of the concept of (in this case) Ithaqua and moves on to stories written around the present day.

In this case the progrenitor story is Algernon Blackwood's "The Wendigo," about a strange encounter some hunters have with the legendary creature, which is an excellent story in its own right. This story, with its notions of an ancient, powerful creature with incomprehensible motives, is sort of a pre-Lovecraft Lovecraftian story. It's obvious why Derleth chose to import the Wendigo into the Mythos under the name Ithaqua.

Another story that might have inspired Derleth, "The Thing from Outside," is also included. This story involves a group of scientist's encounter with an incomprehensible alien. This story isn't as good, it's confusing, and it has the typical pulp horror flaw of the characters coming to realize the true nature of the monster with way too little information available. It is haunting at a few points though.

After this come a three Derleth stories, "The Thing that Walked on the Wind," "The Snow Thing," and "Beyond the Threshold." The first story isn't very well written and packed with too many mythos ideas (typical of Derleth). The Snow Thing, which has the same plot as the first (police investiagtor stumbles onto Ithaqua cult and gets killed) is better written and paced. "Beyond the Threshold" is alright, its main problem (as Price points out in the introduction to a different story) is that Ithaqua's identity isn't that important, the story could be rewritten with any Mythos diety.

The other stories range from middling to good, none of them are really bad, but some aren't that entertaining.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ithaqua was created by Algernon Blackwood and, later, modified by Derleth. This Great Old One is fine! And these tales, too. you must have and read it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 10 people found the following review helpful By jan erik storebø on April 9, 2003
Format: Paperback
this book opens with blackwood's great story: the wendigo. B is the master of the setting, noone can create the background and atmosphere like him. a very well written story from Brennan here. and Meloff's story is also an interesting read. derleth is at his best here. i don''t care that much for the guy, have never considered him to be HPL's great successor or anything, but he knows how to write, and i have always considered his story about Ithaqua to be his best contribution. the rest of the stories are well written. i don't think any of chaosium's anthologies contains of so much good writing than this. but good is not great. and the rest of the stories never turns out to be really good. the suspence killed by irrelevant writing going on for too long, mostly. sad. but the book is still wort reading
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again