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It's Not Carpal Tunnel Syndrome!: RSI Theory and Therapy for Computer Professionals Paperback – April 1, 2001


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Frequently Bought Together

It's Not Carpal Tunnel Syndrome!: RSI Theory and Therapy for Computer Professionals + Conquering Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Other Repetitive Strain Injuries: A Self-Care Program + The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook: Your Self-Treatment Guide for Pain Relief
Price for all three: $47.71

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 234 pages
  • Publisher: Simax (April 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0965510999
  • ISBN-13: 978-0965510998
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #44,797 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Suparna Damany, MSPT, is a certified hand therapist and certified ergonomic assessment specialist. She lives in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Jack Bell is a journalist and the author of Computers Stink. He lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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Customer Reviews

This book and Pascarelli's should be read together since they complement one another.
JackOfMostTrades
In all, a great resource book, not many excersices but a lot of info, and we all know the best tool against any illness is information.
Mario G. Perez Fonseca
That being said, if you could only get two books this should definitely be one of them.
birdie

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

191 of 195 people found the following review helpful By Paul Marxhausen on May 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
When I whipped up a quick Web page for our Engineering College students about Repetitive Strain Injury back in 1994... at first there was only one book on it: Pascarelli and Quilter's "Repetitive Strain Injury". Over time I read more books, heard from other people about still others, and the book list and Web page kept getting longer. Today it's pretty big and with so many books listed the question I ask myself is "what would a new book on RSI have to be like for me to add it to all the stuff that's already out there?"
I got the answer to that when I read "It's Not Carpal Tunnel Syndrome! RSI Theory and Therapy for Computer Professionals", by Suparna Damany, MSPT and Jack Bellis. This book easily makes the "must read" category: in fact, in my opinion it makes it to the "if-you-only-get-one-book-on-RSI- get-this-one" category, although I don't think anything totally bumps Pascarelli and Quilter out of the number one spot. What I've said of P&Q, I say of this book: every computer professional needs to read it.
What's so great, other than the intriguing title? To begin, this book is a "second generation" work on RSI. That is, it draws on the literature, experiences, and discussions of patients and health care professionals who have been dealing with computer-related injuries over the past decade. As I read it I felt like I had a summation of almost everything I've ever read on the SOREHAND e-mail list regarding causes, symptoms, treatment, and prevention, edited and well-presented in 230 pages.
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122 of 124 people found the following review helpful By birdie on October 14, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have been putting off writing my review because I have so much to say and in the meantime my hands are not yet a hundred percent. BUT it is thanks to this book (in conjunction with THE TRIGGERPOINT THERAPY WORKBOOK, which I found later) that I am not disabled today. The doctors I went to were not only shockingly unkind but dangerously misinformed...so I feel it is my duty to pass the info. on ASAP and I will revise this review later.

It's Not Carpal Tunnel Syndrome! is the very best book out there dealing exclusively with repetitive strain injuries. What is great about this book is that it alerts you to the potential severity of the problem without terrifying you - it puts the time frame for healing easily at 6 months and possibly longer. Until I read this book, I had NO idea what was going on.

It offers charts to help you determine if you are a 1st degree, 2nd degree, or 3rd degree sufferer. It divides injuries into two basic categories: muscular and nerve. I would like to add that in my case there was also ligament injury, which was not discussed in this book. It also profiles the personality type that can become more vulnerable to this kind of an injury: perfectionist, obsessive, passionate about work.

My advice is that when it comes to books about this topic, read ABOUT them all carefully and then get all of the ones you need -even if you have to put them on a credit card, your HANDS are at stake! That being said, if you could only get two books this should definitely be one of them. Thank you so much Suparna Damany and Jack Bellis for illuminating this mysterious problem and analyzing it from a new angle.

Other Books I used and that you must look into to get a clear picture:

THE TRIGGER POINT THERAPY WORKBOOK by Clair Davies.
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60 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Mario G. Perez Fonseca on June 26, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you suffer, like me, from a RSI, namely from PC overuse (although there's a lot of ways of acquiring this illnes, like knitting, playing golf, tennis or other repetitive motion) this is the book for you.
There are many books out there, and although I have not read them all, I have researched a lot about this illness and this is one of the best books to get. Filled with information about Computer acquired RSI, the authors go through every major detail about the illness: Posture, genetics, diet, work habits, ergonomic workstations, you name it, they have researched a lot.
Then book features a direct and easy language, nice B/W illustrations, and many sites for research all over the Web, which you can use to further your knowledge about RSI.
This book doesn't feature too many excersices, it is mainly informative, and the authors just give a few pointers and encourage the reader to find professional help.
Now the negative: There are a couple of things I did find somwhat odd in this book. After describing and defining RSI, and documenting how missunderstood this illness is by the medical community, they jump into their major recommendation: Go to a doctor and get a proffessional opinion. Well then you have to find a doctor versed in RSI, and not one that only want to operate, like they did on the many cases described in the book.
Second, I actually found a little offensive. They are quick to dissmiss any form of alternative therapy such as herbs, taking vitamn B6, homeophaty or even acupuncture regarding them as 'new agey' and not worth trying. To the mainstream or regular medical community, massages and physcal therapy like the authors suggest are also alternative.
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