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It's When You Sell That Counts Paperback – February 1, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Global Professional Publishing; 3rd edition (February 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0852976860
  • ISBN-13: 978-0852976869
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,293,663 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Here is my advice -- Read. Read books that bring you sanity, the ones that will snap you back into the shell of investor and out of the sorry shell of nervous observer of the daily stock market melodrama. The following books are excellent choices and will come with plenty of sanity and sage advice. I'll start with It's When You Sell that Counts by Donald Cassidy. Selling is usually as polular as candy the day after Halloween. During secular bull markets selling is frowned upon as buy and hold turns into investing religion."

"Anyone can buy stocks - the art for a successful stock broker however, lies in selling at just the right time. The third edition of It's When You Sell That Counts is a guide for amateur stock brokers to help sell at the right time to maximize their profits. He presents a powerful hold/sell test to show when one should rid themself of a stock at it's peak, while examining what may prevent them from selling at the right time - both physical and psychological barriers. Packed cover to cover with invaluable advice for any broker, and enhanced with an index and many appendixes It's When You Sell That Counts is highly recommended to personal finance shelves everywhere."

About the Author

Donald Cassidy is the founder and executive director of the Retirement Investing Institute (RII), a not-for-profit organization devoted to helping individual investors face the challenges of investing and retirement. Formerly, he was Senior Research Analyst, Lipper Inc., a Reuters Company, from 1990-2006. He is the author of five books on personal investing, including When the Dow Breaks (McGraw Hill), as well as a weekly radio guest on mutual funds for a local Denver radio station. In addition, he is the author of an online mutual funds curriculum for the Wall Street University.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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For anyone who invests, this is really a must read book.
dcarson@wamedes.com
The book presents selling principles that can be adapted to each individual's investment approach and needs.
R
I admire this book for the insight it bestows and for the elegance of the presentation.
Dr. James C. Smith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 59 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 21, 1999
Format: Hardcover
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Don Cassidy has written an absolutely fascinating book. Each and every chapter is a gem in itself. Any investor who reads the book and diligently follows the advice given by Cassidy would do very, very well in actively managing his/her investments.
In particular, the book helped me to overcome some of the mental blocks that Cassidy mentions and enabled me to sell some shares of a stock that I had fallen deeply in love with, i.e. the stock of the company that I work for!
I am sure that the profits that I have reaped by following Cassidy's advice have paid for the price of the book, several times over.
I would also like to post the titles of all the chapters in Cassidy's book since I noticed that the book's webpage doesn't have them and also because I think just reading the titles of these chapters would spark the interest of those who still haven't read it...
Table of Contents
Sect. I. Roadblocks to Profitable Selling: Real Problems, Phobias, Myths, and Rationalizations Ch. 1. External Roadblocks Ch. 2. Hidden Reasons We Resist Selling Ch. 3. Internal Rationalizations
Sect. II. Developing the Proper Mind-Set for Profitable Sales Ch. 4. Acknowledge Mistakes Ch. 5. Keep a Clear Head Ch. 6. Transform Denial into Action Ch. 7. Require Realism to Support Hope Ch. 8. Forget Your Cost Price Ch. 9. Understand that You Sell the Stock, Not the Company Ch. 10. Adopt Survival Tactics for the Institutional Jungle
Sect. III. Mastering the Contrarian Approach Ch. 11. Be a Contrarian Ch. 12. Focus on the Time Value of Money Ch. 13. Rethink That Old Buy-and-Hold Religion Ch. 14. Calibrate Decision Making to Personal Emotions Ch. 15. Adjust Sale Targets Rationally Ch. 16.
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34 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Ginensky on January 29, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book has 2 problems, which account for my low rating:
1. This book is focused only on "trading" and not investing. In other words, it seeks to maximize short term profits, and does not deal with the investor who is willing to take risks and ride out adversity and selling opportunities for a profit in the long term. Unfortunately, this orientation is not explained in the book description, and is only stated as a "by the way" on page 87. I probably would not have bought it if I had known this. For the investor, this book is of very limited value. It is hard for me to judge the value to traders, since I am not very knowledgable on the subject.
2. The bulk of this book is explanation of technical sell indicators. There is no attempt to connect between them, merely to catalog all the various "sell" signs. The fact that many of the indicators may contradict themselves with an individual stock is not dealt with.
On the positive side, the first part of the book lays out a laundry list of reasons why there is a bias against selling, ranging from the nature of the brokerage industry to behavioral economics. I found this part of the book very interesting and fresh, and it provided useful food for thought about my own patterns of selling. If you can find the book cheaply, it is worth the price for the first section alone, even if you are an investor and not a trader.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Dr. James C. Smith on November 17, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I admire this book for the insight it bestows and for the elegance of the presentation. I have looked high and low for just such books and have found surprisingly few. The breadth and depth of Donald Cassidy's expertise is nothing less than impressive. As a powerful added bonus, he does a fantastic job of communicating, organizing and presenting his understanding and knowledge.
I am strongly recommending this book to my closest investment friends, and I suggest that any independent investor who is truly serious about mastering the art and skill of trading, at least take a close look at this book. Also, be sure to look at Mr. Cassidy's other two books.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 29, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This easily beats all the other psychology AND buying books I own. It's a great investing pyschology book without a megalomaniac author. It has great technical analysis methods and will teach you quite a bit about buying also. From understanding stock prices in relation to buying and selling pressures, to the avoidance of getting trampled by mutual fund elephants, this is the guide.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 18, 2008
Format: Paperback
Selling is usually as popular as candy the day after Halloween. During secular bull markets selling is frowned upon as buy and hold turns into investing religion. And since sell violates the "hold" covenant of that religion, the investor who buys and sells is labeled as a nonbeliever, or even worse, trader (if you say 'trader' fast enough it sounds like 'traitor').

In secular bull markets, on average, sell decisions are not as rewarding as hold decisions, as market valuations are expanding and even second caliber dogs (stocks) start looking like pedigreed cocker spaniels. Every investor is now a "long-term" investor and sell becomes a four letter word. But being a long-term investor is not about longevity of your hold decisions but it is an attitude. Holding a stock because you bought it is a fallacy; you should only hold a stock if future risk adjusted return warrants it.

Warren Buffett has been mistakenly promoted (though, I'd argue demoted) into the god status of this buy and hold temple. Let's correct this mistake. Warren Buffett became a buy and hold investor when his portfolio and positions became big enough, pushing $60 billion, when selling became a difficult undertaking. In his early career, before "Oracle of Omaha" became his middle name, he was a buy and sell investor. Being on the board of some of his biggest holdings (like Coke and Washington Post) made selling even more difficult.

One doesn't need the benefit of hindsight to know that at 55 times earnings Coke was tremendously overvalued in 1999. Coke, like the majority of his top public holdings (Washington Post, Procter & Gamble, Johnson and Jonson and many others), did not go anywhere in a decade.
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