Ivy and Bean (Book 7): What's the Big Idea? and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $5.00 (33%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Ivy and Bean What's the B... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: A well-cared-for item that has seen limited use but remains in great condition. The item is complete, unmarked, and undamaged, but may show some limited signs of wear. Item works perfectly.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Ivy and Bean What's the Big Idea? (Book 7) Hardcover – September 22, 2010


See all 14 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$9.99
$2.12 $0.01

National Geographic Little Kids First Big Book of Who
Introduce readers, ages 6 – 8, to some of history's most interesting and important people in this lively compilation of biographies. See more featured history for kids 6 - 8
$9.99 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Ivy and Bean What's the Big Idea? (Book 7) + Ivy and Bean No News Is Good News (Book 8) (Ivy & Bean) + Ivy & Bean: Doomed to Dance (Ivy & Bean, Book 6)
Price for all three: $33.90

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

(c) Copyright 2010.  Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review

"Annie Barrows accomplishes the almost impossible task of reflecting the world of second grader, creating the tension and drama of family and friendships in language that can be read easily by child who recently graduated from easy readers to early chapter books. " - Lisa Von Drasek, Children's Librarian, Bank Street College of Education
If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $1.99 (Save 48%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Children's Easter Books
Visit the Children's Easter Bookstore to find sweet stories to enjoy with family and friends.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 6 - 10 years
  • Grade Level: 1 - 5
  • Lexile Measure: 550L (What's this?)
  • Series: Ivy and Bean (Book 7)
  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books (September 22, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811866920
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811866927
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 7.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #712,766 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

I could tell you a whole bunch of facts about myself--born here, went to school there, blah blah--but that doesn't seem like much fun. So I've decided to make you guys do some work. If you can figure out these puzzles, you'll know all sorts of interesting things about me. And many of them are true, too.

1. I was born in a year with a 2 in it. Also a 6.
2. I was born in a city in California that begins with an S and has eight letters total.
3. The first time I moved, I couldn't move.
4. My best friend lived next door, had four older brothers and sisters, and a name that rhymes with Gabe. She had thirty-seven plastic horses and one real horse.
5. My first job was in a place with lots of books. My second job was in a place with lots of sugar. My third job was in a different place with lots of books.
6. I went to college in a town with a K in it and I studied a subject that ends in Y.
7. After I was done with college, I got a job. And then another one. And then there was one after that. Don't worry about it.
8. One of the following things is not true: I have been up in a hot air balloon. I have six toes on one of my feet. I can read palms.
9. I have written fifteen books under three different names. See if you can figure out what they are.
10. I have two pets. They are bigger than a bar of soap and smaller than a shoe, and they really like parsley.

Have fun!
Annie Barrows



Customer Reviews

Reading this book aloud I actually laughed so hard we had to stop reading for a few minutes.
Susan E. Burris
I purchased this book for my 8 year old daughter - she loves the Ivy & Bean series and always looks forward to receiving and reading the next book.
Mara Marozzelli
Would read again, teaches very good lessons and makes me think and of course makes me laugh.
elizabeth

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Susan E. Burris on October 7, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Ivy and Bean is my favorite kids series to read with my first grader. Reminiscent of the Ramona series, Ivy and Bean contains characters with good hearts and kid reasoning that occasionally causes trouble. We have loved every one of these books.

Ivy and Bean What's the Big Idea does not disappoint. Reading this book aloud I actually laughed so hard we had to stop reading for a few minutes. The chapters are short, the vocabulary is manageable and the characters are admirable, and the message is positive. I wish there were 100 books in this series. Unlike the Junie B. Jones series, the characters are well-behaved and have good intentions. Although they have flawed reasoning, they have good hearts and try to good.

My only complaint (and it is really my daughter's complaint) is that the cover is misleading. The girls never mix anything in beakers. The illustration on the cover of our book has the girls' teeth looking strangely gray.

Annie Barrows has a gift with words and children relate to her. I highly recommend this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By mek on April 16, 2012
Format: Paperback
I just read this with my daughter. We LOVE Ivy and Bean and usually we laugh out loud so hard. But this one was different. It provided a lot of information about global warming and that was very disturbing for my daughter, who is 7. The book focuses on the effects of global warming on animals and nature, but my daughter made the link to people and was really disturbed by the fact that the people who are making global warming pollution (us, primarily) are not the ones who are going to feel most of the impacts (she asked specifically about people in Africa). When we were done with the book, she asked a million questions and I felt like I had to answer truthfully but still tried to put an optimistic spin on the issue. Even so, we were both depressed afterward and she doesn't want to read Ivy and Bean anymore.
That said, the book provides a way to broach a very difficult topic with kids and the information is accurate and truthful. I appreciate that the author didn't sugar coat such a serious topic. She empowers kids as well and shows how they can change adults and the world.
I just wish we had been ready to such a serious topic - its like reading a book about cancer - you want to know what you are getting into rather than expecting to laugh for the next half hour and instead ending up in tears.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By toothrough on February 17, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My seven year old is a big reader and loves this series. I find the books to be fun and cute without the words being too difficult. The only downside for us is that my daughter is reading them faster than they're being written. I wouldn't suggest this as an independent reader for newer readers (those just coming out of the Step readers etc) unless you are reading it with them. We like to pick one book to read together and take turns reading pages. I've found that it helps my daughter remember what she's read more and I get a better sense of what the books are about without having to pre-read them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
First, some context for my review: My 7-year-old daughter in first grade LOVES Ivy + Bean, and she devours each book in a single sitting. I like that this series encourages her to read independently. I, however, am not too fond of the misbehavior depicted in the series, but I am reading the books so that I can remind my daughter, when necessary, "This makes for a good story, but you KNOW you can't do that in real life, right?"

In my opinion, this book is one of the better ones, more in the league of Book 3 ("Break the Fossil Record") and Book 9 ("Make the Rules").

I really like Ms. Aruba-Tate. She's such a great teacher. I loved the way she put words to the way the class was feeling (on page 33): "I'm hearing that you are very worried about global warming. I'm feeling sorry that you're worried, but I'm also feeling glad that you care so much about the earth."

The entire school is having a science fair, and everyone in Ms. Aruba-Tate's class needs to come up with an idea on how to solve the global warming problem. Ivy and Bean's classmates came up with some pretty amusing ideas, and I have to say, Ivy and Bean's final idea was creative while also making a good point.

I like that this book shows the girls engaged in science, and it also introduces an important real-life issue. At one point, Ivy mentions "Lisa Something", and once again, I wondered why the actual historical figure (in this case, Lise Meitner, a woman who helped discover nuclear fission) wasn't mentioned by name. (Book 5 - "Bound to be Bad" - neglects to mention St. Francis of Assisi by name.) As it turned out, though, Lise Meitner was identified in the book's appendix, in which the author further discussed global warming.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My six-year-old daughter loves to read and has recently started reading chapter books. Once she got over her obsession with the Junie B. Jones series, I managed to get her interested in the Cam Jansen series of books and then I discovered the Ivy and Bean series. My daughter loves the central characters, Bean and her best friend Ivy. The girls are precocious, intelligent, and always up to some adventure (or misadventure, depending on how one looks at it!). These traits appeal to my daughter as she is quite the adventurer herself, and the chapters are relatively short, which makes it easy for her to read independently. The books average about 120 pages, and she manages to read up to 40 pages per sitting (around 45 minutes).

What I found to be fascinating was that the plot for each story is so well-written and developed that my daughter could not stop once she started reading! I usually sit with her and supervise her reading, helping out with some difficult words, and she gets so involved with the story that she just keeps on reading. This to me is the mark of a good book, one that entices a young reader to keep reading. The language is not overly simplified, on the contrary, there are some challenging words which I help my daughter with (pronunciation and definition, if necessary).

The black and white illustrations by Sophie Blacksall that appear in each chapter add to the appeal of these books. In the seventh installment, Ivy and Bean are informed by their teacher, Ms. Aruba-Tate that there is to be science fair at their school. The theme is global warming, and the children in the class are told to come up with interesting projects. Of course, Ivy and Bean are raring to go and devise all sorts of strange and interesting experiments, but nothing seems to work. What will the girls think of next and will it work? This is another winner in the Ivy and Bean series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Ivy and Bean What's the Big Idea? (Book 7)
This item: Ivy and Bean What's the Big Idea? (Book 7)
Price: $14.99 $9.99
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?