J.S. Bach: Complete Cello Suites

October 9, 2007 | Format: MP3

$17.49
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Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
2:17
30
2
4:25
30
3
2:25
30
4
2:30
30
5
3:05
30
6
1:38
30
7
3:36
30
8
3:55
30
9
1:48
30
10
4:06
30
11
3:00
30
12
2:33
30
13
3:10
30
14
4:00
30
15
2:55
30
16
3:56
30
17
3:27
30
18
3:09
Disc 2
30
1
3:57
30
2
4:34
30
3
3:39
30
4
3:47
30
5
4:20
30
6
2:31
30
7
6:03
30
8
4:50
30
9
2:05
30
10
3:20
30
11
4:59
30
12
2:14
30
13
4:27
30
14
7:34
30
15
3:33
30
16
4:30
30
17
3:20
30
18
4:01

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 11, 2007
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: harmonia mundi
  • Copyright: 2007 harmonia mundi
  • Total Length: 2:09:39
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0011CWWXO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #141,102 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Now I really want to hear her in person.
Noel Jones, AAGO
This recording is very much alive with them, and to them, and it resonates with a realness as a result.
GTS
Fine recorded sound, plenty reverb as it's recorded in a church, but good detail too.
J. TIMMERMAN

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 60 people found the following review helpful By GTS on July 12, 2008
Format: Audio CD
This was played for me in my local classical CD store and that was it: I was hooked. When I then saw it in my local high-street national chain on sale at a ridiculous price I walked off with it like a kid at Christmas. Everyone who has heard the opening strains has said "That's fast", to which I have singularly replied "Yep - great isn't it?". And they have all remembered I'm a period enlightenment nut, and gone "Of course".

It has everything to recommend it, this recording, from exquisite technique and musicianship, to ear-pricking boldness, gusto and courage, to a wonderful space around the recording that gives an atmosphere of elegance without being austere, reserved or removed. This could at once be in a great hall of kings, or in a little front room of a village cottage. Either which way, it really fills the room with a presence and spritely-ness that commands attention and bestows a great big smile.

Queyras' recording had the misfortune to emerge at the same time as, and therefore under the blanket approval of, the admittedly great Steven Isserlis recording (yes, I love that one too). For that Isserlis set there was much media interest in how Isserlis had held off the Bach, made/waited himself ready, studied the pieces carefully, and identified (amazingly sombrely, given his findings) the dance rhythms and elements as the core of the works. (Doubtless this was highlighted because the record company / artist probably pushed it that way as a way of establishing an originality to justify another Cello Suites, as if any talented professional cellist needs the "contributing something new" clause or excuse to attempt on disc what is the pinnacle of their instrument's existence!!!
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By l'auditeur on February 17, 2009
Format: Audio CD
It's true that these suites have been frequently recorded. But it's with good reason! Bach's work surpasses all others in its capacity to be plumbed, developed and re-imagined and displays unrivaled excellence and elegance on every compositional level. There is so much to be developed and highlighted in these works, a lifetime of performances may only scratch the surface.

It's also true that many have recorded these suites despite having nothing new to say and often possessing less than admirable technical skill, but since Casals they have figured at the heart of the cello repertoire, and every cellist is eager to conquer them. Each suite is difficult in it's own way, and the fifth and sixth suites are rather notorious for their formidable technical hurdles. It's rare to hear an individual who exhibits a true mastery over any given suite, much less the whole set.

Queyras is that rare individual. And not only does he execute the technical demands of these suites with astonishing perfection and grace, but his interpretation brings something totally new to the table. He discusses in the liner notes a sense of phrasing which--respecting the contrapuntal nature of these works--treats melodic lines less like vocal song and more like spoken conversation. He executes them this way, deftly shifting his coloring of each phrase to bring out oft-hidden exchanges between voices to a startling and extremely pleasing effect.

Queyras infuses each suite with an individual character by giving to each one a unique set of timbrel colors. I can't say I've ever encountered such an approach in other recordings, but at the same time, I don't think I've encountered another cellist able to draw so many different types of tone colors.
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45 of 53 people found the following review helpful By J. Lambie on April 26, 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When I got this CD, my wife remarked, not without some justice,

"Oooo! More Bach cello. Just what you needed." Well...yeah. There are more first-rate classical musicians in the world today than Bach would have believed possible. And more of them are being recorded than ever before and if that isn't just one of the neatest things about being alive today then I'm a Dutchman. And if getting even a mediocre recording of the cello suites at Naxos prices isn't one of the other neatest things then I'm Dutchman 2, The Sequel. And this, my friends is no mediocre recording. No, no and no.

In reading, as I do, the other reviews on the Amazon website, it appears to me that the most grievous sin in Bach cello performances is nasty old "rubato". An awful lot of folks get their knickers in disarray over it's appearance. My guess is they don't like surprises. I figure a man or woman puts in the years of dedication and dicipline it takes to master an instrument as difficult as the cello; puts in the time to learn a score...learn it so well that they don't even have to think about it but can just make music; well I figure that man or woman has earned his or her rubato. Be warned. Ms. Kliegel uses rubato. And, boy oh boy, does she make music.

I know, Casals blah blah, Fournier blah blah, Schiff blah, Rostropovich blah, Maisky bl...etc. I have them all and they are each uniquely splendid. And everybody knows it. As Dogberry says to his deputy, "Comparisons are odorous, Master Verges." But if you must compare this performance, I guess you can hold it next to Gendron as she's using his Stradivarius. And ladies and gentlemen, the SOUND!
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