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J2EE 1.4: The Big Picture Paperback – June 28, 2004

3.9 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

"Need to learn J2EE? J2EE 1.4: The Big Picture is a must-have guide that is both enjoyable and educational. I highly recommend it."

--Peter van der Linden, software consultant and author of Expert C Programming, Not Just Java, and Just Java


"Anyone working with J2EE needs this book. You can get the details and the code examples from a lot of other places, but this book provides the essential under-standing of all the parts and how they work together."

--Simon Roberts, author of the Sun Certified Enterprise Architect for J2EE Technology Certification Exam and Study Guide


"I've ordered copies of J2EE 1.4: The Big Picture for everyone in my department. Not only because it's the most understandable technical book I've ever read, but because my review copy keeps disappearing from my office."

--Larissa Carroll, manager, BEA Systems


"If you're tired of technical books that are all about the details and don't tell you how the whole thing works, you want this book. There's absolutely nothing else like it."

--Patricia Parkhill, managing editor, Sun Microsystems


"I like it very much. It definitely paints a clear picture of the whole J2EE thing. It's a book I'd recommend to J2EE developers of any skill level."

--Dirk Schreckmann, JavaRanch Journal Editor and Sheriff in the JavaRanch Big Moose Saloon


"This book gives me a headache, because on just about every page I'd slap myself in the head and say 'That's it?!? That's what all the mystery is about?!' Now I feel like I'm in the know. I might not be able to code this stuff yet, but I sure get what's going on now."

--Floyd Jones, senior technical writer, BEA Systems


"This book makes J2EE seem so easy. The informal, friendly tone of the book is extremely helpful. It made me understand the beans stuff, CMP and BMP, with-out any effort at all. In fact, it is frighteningly perfect and uncomplicated. I think the book is also just the right one for managers, project managers, and other non-techies who interact with J2EE developers."

--Manish Hatwalne, Software Consultant, Circus Software LLC


"I love J2EE 1.4: The Big Picture. I love how it breaks down a big thing, like J2EE services and architecture, into smaller digestible chunks. And once in the micro topic, the explanations are so easy to absorb. The explanations do build on top of each other, making--dare I say it--a big picture. And I FINALLY GET TRANSACTIONS!"

--Jeannie Saur, documentation specialist, Trimble Navigation Limited


"I would recommend this as a good beginner's reference for J2EE, or for anyone looking for a supplement for an advanced J2EE course."

--College Java instructor



0131480103B08162004

About the Author

Solveig Haugland is a technical writer and instructor. She knows what it's like to sit through hours of tech gibberish that make absolutely no sense. She would sooner drink a vial of really vile poison than put stuff into this book like "session beans reify the enduring business processes of your enterprise." Without a suitable explanation, at least.

Mark Cade is a member of Sun Professional Services. This is the same group that brought you John Crupi, Deepak Alur, and Dan Malks of Core J2EE Patterns fame. Mark's been with Java since the beginning and works on big J2EE projects for a living. He's also the coauthor of the Sun J2EE architect exam and the architect exam study guide.

Anthony Orapallo is a technical instructor and has taught a variety of Java topics, including Sun's Enterprise JavaBeans course. He knows what it's like to be up there in front of a class explaining just what the Home interface is, so he knows how to teach.



0131480103AB08162004
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall PTR (June 28, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0131480103
  • ISBN-13: 978-0131480100
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,290,793 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book reminds me of Kathy Sierra and Bert Bates' Head First Books. Cute easy to remember monikers. Just like the title says "the big picture...", and that's what they deliver! A very nice broad coverage of J2EE technology and concepts. If you don't have a clue what J2EE is about, they do a wonderful job of easing you through it without any code samples. The book is not at the level of Head First Series but the topics were nicely broken down, with a casual informal style of delivery and plenty of illustrations and pneumonics. For a small book, it has a lot of info.
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Format: Paperback
You know how most java books go from Hello World directly to Now Write Your Own Banking System From Scratch?

Not so here. Haugland & co. illuminate the concepts crucial to understanding this new revision of the language so you can actually make use of the platform without spending forever wading through code samples.

It will make your job easier.
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Format: Paperback
I am a nongeek in the J2EE world and have finally found a book that tells me what I actually need to know. I feel I have a much better grasp of J2EE, EJBs, Jsps, and so on now that I have The Big Picture. There's a lot of good high level information on the point of J2EE, the "from the beginning" rationale that doesn't get enough play. There are some code

examples showing how you put together EJBs, some examples of JSPs and servlets, but in general the book doesn't go off the deep end with too much technical detail. (Which is where the other books lose me.) There is also a very informative chapter on Web services that a nice explanation of how they work, plus what they're good for and some disadvantages.
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Format: Paperback
Whether you are an expert in Java or not, this book will tell you what exactly you want to learn and know about J2EE.

This is a must have book for anyone who is working as a Java programmer.

You will learn all the J2EE concepts, which you will not get even if you go for a 3-day intensive training on J2EE.

I very much enjoyed every chapter of this book even though some topics have been repeated. This book explains all the components under J2EE in a very simple but effective way. Each chapter also has a brief summary of what it's going to cover and its also addressed well later. Java Server Faces is not covered.

Best book to buy and read when you have free time or on the journey.
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Technology is a nasty business that revolves around inside secrets, secret handshakes, winks, nods, and superiority complexes, and it manifests itself as acronym soup cooked up by people who have more Star Wars action figures than real friends. Thank GOD for this book, I say. It gives you brilliantly clear (and necessarily simple) explanations of J2EE concepts and shows how all the pieces relate to each other. What's even better is that the book gives you a mental framework to catch and categorize the perpetual deluge of acronym soup being dumped on you. I know the concepts will even help me understand the pieces of (dare I say it) .NET once I dive into that mess. If you're gonna spend even 5 more minutes in the software world, you owe it to your own sanity to get, read, and share this book.

And yes, it's funny, but not in a distracting way. I mean, come on. Even if you don't share the same sense of humor, anybody who doesn't appreciate some kind of lightness in the face of something like J2EE needs to just lock themselves up in their room and play with Luke, Leia, Han, and Chewy.
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Format: Paperback
This book does an excellent job of introducing the higher level concepts and guidelines of J2EE architecture. It's well written, clear, accurate, and welcoming. I've already bought copies for friends.
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Format: Paperback
The book is full of "cutesiness" which makes the book much longer than it need be.

Conversely - what the book lacks is a good solid explanation, with detailed examples, of basic elements of J2EE like the Home_interface Component/Local/Remote interface - and how they actually tie-in with the Clients and RDBMS. It's not that these things aren't mentioned. They are. For example chapter12, p.148 :

"The Home interface is kind of like a hostess at a restaurant. In fancier restaurants you don't find your own table and order your food directly from the chef; you ask the hostess to find you a seat and the hostess assigns you a waiter who talks to the chef.You ask the waiter for your food".

Followed by 8 pages containing some codes and and explanations - that don't really explain how you connect everything together.

So in conclusion - if what you want is to know the buzz-words, the book is to long.

If what you need is technical detail beyond a long explanation why J2EE is like a fancy restaurant,

and that: "The database just sits around holding data. Sometimes it hums snatches from Broadway musicals softly to itself but mostly it doesn't do much. And that doesn't do anyone any good. like a library without a librarian" (p.159)

- than this book is disappointing
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Format: Paperback
This is quite possibly the worst book ever written. I've actually not finished reading it, and probably never will; I've tried three times, but end up putting it down after 20 pages every time I pick it up. I recently brought it on a plane trip with me so I had several hours with it, but it's just not possible to get very far. You truly have to suspend disbelief while reading this piece of garbage: "Are they really writing this? Doesn't Prentice Hall use editors? Or at least some sort of grammar check?"

Every aspect of technology has been personified or anthropomorphized. The Dolphin is constantly talking to the Statue of Atlas who in turn talks to the Golden Retriever, but they only explain once that the Golden Retrieve equals the database server, so after five pages when you've forgotten that fact none of it makes any sense any more. You literally need Cliffs Notes to decode what the authors are talking about. All the "characters" talk to each other, with dialogue and everything. And the dialogue is AWFUL. If you can't write poetry or prose, then why bother writing a little play between the web serving Bee and the web containing Horse? Reading terrible writing is surprisingly distracting. Midway through trying to comprehend a concept the authors cut away to an example where the Scarecrow says something unbelievably stupid to the Cowardly Lion and all you can think is "how did this make it into the final draft?" Congratulations: you just wasted the last five minutes of your life, and you have nothing at all to show for it. (Aside: they actually use the characters from the Wizard of Oz to represent some concept, but the analogy is so flawed that they literally take several sentences explaining how the Tin Man represents Resource Management.
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