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J2EE Web Services: XML SOAP WSDL UDDI WS-I JAX-RPC JAXR SAAJ JAXP Paperback – October 30, 2003


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J2EE Web Services: XML SOAP WSDL UDDI WS-I JAX-RPC JAXR SAAJ JAXP + Building Web Services with Java: Making Sense of XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI (2nd Edition)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 928 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (October 30, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321146182
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321146182
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.1 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #841,461 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

J2EE™ Web Services is written in the tradition of great books people have come to expect from author Richard Monson-Haefel. More than a complete and concise Web services reference, this essential guide is the way for J2EE developers to quickly master Web services architecture and development.”

         —Floyd Marinescu
             Author, EJB Design Patterns
             Director, TheServerSide.com

“Written in a straightforward and approachable style, Monson-Haefel’s latest book is a mustread for any Java developer who is serious about understanding and applying the J2EE APIs in support of Web services. By concentrating on the core technologies endorsed by the WS-I, it clearly explains why Web services will succeed in realizing the interoperability promise where previous attempts have failed.”

         —James McCabe
             Software IT Architect IBM

“This is the best—and most complete—description of J2EE Web services that I’ve seen. If you’re a Java developer, you need this book.”

         —David Chappell
             Chappell & Associates

“For Java Web service developers, this book is going to be there on their desk next to their PC for easy reference. The book has it all, clear guides as to what WSDL, SAAJ, UDDI are, and how they are used in a variety of examples. Monson-Haefel has created another classic with this volume.”

         —Dr. Bruce Scharlau
             Department of Computing Science
             University of Aberdeen, Scotland

“Richard Monson-Haefel provides the most comprehensive analysis of J2EE Web services that I’ve seen so far to date. This book covers the core Web services technologies (XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI), as well as the Java APIs for Web services (JAX-RPC, SAAJ, JAXR, JAXP, and Web Services for J2EE, version 1.1). Richard also goes into detail on issues such as fault handling, type mapping, and JAX-RPC handlers. Developers will find this book to be a very valuable reference.”

         —Anne Thomas Manes
             Research Director, Burton Group
             Author, Web Services: A Manager’s Guide

J2EE™ Web Services is an excellent reference and tutorial for both beginning and seasoned Web services architects and developers. This book is the first to fully cover the WS-I 1.0 Web services standards and their integration with J2EE 1.4 components. Spend time with this book, and you’ll soon master J2EE Web Services and be able to successfully use this technology to solve key business integration problems in your enterprise.”

         —Tom Marrs
             Senior J2EE/XML/Web Services Architect
             Distributed Computing Solutions, Inc.

Web services are revolutionizing the way enterprises conduct business, as they allow disparate applications to communicate and exchange business data. Now, Java 2, Enterprise Edition (J2EE™) delivers a complete Web services platform. But how do you make sense of the sea of acronyms in this emerging area? Richard Monson-Haefel comes to the rescue with this essential guide for Java developers who need to understand J2EE APIs for Web services and the Web services standards.

J2EE™ Web Services is a comprehensive guide to developing and deploying Web services using J2EE technology. Concentrating on standards sanctioned by the Web Services Interoperability Organization (WS-I) for maximum interoperability, the author delves into Web-service standards and the J2EE 1.4 Web-service APIs and components with clear and engaging discussions.

Key topics covered include:

  • XML (eXtensible Markup Language) and XML Schema
  • SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol)
  • WSDL (Web Services Description Language)
  • UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration)
  • JAX-RPC (Java API for XML-based RPC)
  • SAAJ (SOAP with Attachments API for Java)
  • JAXR (Java API for XML Registries)
  • JAXP (Java API for XML Processing)
  • The appendices complement this wealth of information with coverage of XML regular expressions, Base 64 encoding, DTDs (document type definitions), SOAP Messages with Attachments (SwA), RCP/Encoded SOAP messaging, and references to other resources. In short, this accessible reference will give Java developers the tools they need to use J2EE technologies and APIs to integrate both enterprise applications and Web-based applications.



    About the Author

    Richard Monson-Haefel currently serves on the J2EE 1.4 and EJB 2.1 expert groups for the Java Community Process. He is a founder of the Apache J2EE Application Server Project (Geronimo) and a lead developer of its J2EE Web Services implementation. He assisted Sun in the development of the SCDJWS Exam. Mr. Monson-Haefel is the author of four best-selling editions of Enterprise JavaBeans, which won the 2001 JavaPRO Reader's Choice award for Best Advanced Java Book, the 1999 Java Developer Journal's Editor's Choice award for Best Java Book, and Amazon's Best of 2001 and Best of 2002 awards. He is also the coauthor of Java Message Service, which won the 2002 Java Developer Journal's Reader's Choice award for Best Java Book.




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    Customer Reviews

    3.9 out of 5 stars

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

    48 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Riccardo Audano on November 24, 2005
    Format: Paperback
    Warning: this book is only a rumination on the J2EE web services specification, fat on "theory" and with absolutely no real code examples you can run and play with to learn. Unless you are someone who can learn playing tennis looking at people playing it, or become a musician by listening to music, I doubt you can become a web services developer by just reading words and code snippets.

    As the author says: "this book doesn't attempt to cover installation, configuration, or deployment except in terms of standard J2EE requirements". I do believe that a decent tech book must have running code to support its explanations and support its value and usefulness. With this text Monson-Haefel is well on his way to win the "Most useless java book of the year" award.
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    6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 11, 2004
    Format: Paperback
    This book takes the reader from first principles, laying a foundation upon which the implications and potential of Web services can be fully understood. Early chapters introduce and explain Web services basics.
    Throughout the book the author maintains a vendor neutral perspective. So if you want to read an introductory text on web-services at leisure, this book is a good choice. Its written in a very comprehensible style and I had no problems understanding the key concepts.
    If you are seeking to learn the details of web services beyond introductory concepts then this isn't the book for you.
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    13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Vinny Carpenter on February 12, 2004
    Format: Paperback
    J2EE Web Services by Richard Monson-Haefel is the current de-facto standard bible for Web Services development on Java. I had pre-ordered this book on Amazon and have read through this book several times in the last few months and I absolutely love this book. Richard has created a great resource for the J2EE developer that's looking to build interoperable Web Services.
    Most EJB developers are already familiar with Richard Monson-Haefel's work in his OReilly EJB's book. He brings that expertise into the realm of J2EE and Web Services. In fact, this is the first book to talk about Web Services Interoperability Organization's (WS-I) Basic Profile 1.0.
    WS-I is an open, industry organization chartered to promote Web services interoperability across platforms, operating systems, and programming languages. WS-I Basic Profile 1.0 is set of recommendations on how to use web services specifications to maximize interoperability. This book delves into the details of J2EE 1.4 and how we as Java developer can build and consume Web Services in a standard way.
    The book starts off with an introduction to XML, SOAP, WSDL and UDDI before jumping into the meat, Java API for XML-Based RPC (JAX-RPC). If you don't have any experience with those technologies, the book offers a great tutorial on those items. I was particularly impressed with the treatment on XML Schemas in the 3rd chapter.
    Once the basic groundwork is laid with a solid introduction to XML, SOAP, WSDL and UDDI, the book jumps right in the JAX-RPC platform. In fact, the middle half of the book is dedicated to JAX-RPC. JAX-RPC is a specification for making remote procedure calls via XML and SOAP over HTTP. JAX-RPC provides an easy to develop programming model for development of SOAP based Web services.
    Read more ›
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    25 of 33 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 12, 2004
    Format: Paperback
    There is NOT even one example in this book that can run on the computer. So, how can people learn web services by this book? Who is this book for? Is it for experts of web services? Experts do not need to read this book. Is it for people who don't know web services and want to learn? You cannot learn by this book. Is it a good reference book? NO. Therefore, this book is useless. Even the author himself doesn't know who is this book for. He wrote in his book:" It (the book) is more of a reference than a tutorial, but many of the chapters have a tutorial-like style. This book is designed to teach J2EE Web Services and is more than a reference." (page xxxiv of the book). From what the author wrote, we can see that this book is not a tutorial, and is not a good reference book. The author just copy and past some contents from Internet and mix up, that is the book.
    Besides, the book repeats same XML document again and again, just wastes paper, and makes the book thick and heavy.
    I wish this kind of book would disappear in amazon web site. I wnat to rate this book by 0 star.
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    8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J Philbin on August 1, 2006
    Format: Paperback
    It's been enduring pain when I tested the code examples and it did'nt work on JBoss. The content looks a bit old and needs an update.
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    7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Carroll VINE VOICE on November 3, 2005
    Format: Paperback
    Most of the other books about this subject are three or more years old. In other words, too old to be useful.

    This book covers it all, from the details of mapping between Java and WSDL to the proper way to deploy web services, right down to the deployment descriptors.

    It's a really well done book. I say this as somone who's currently writing web services and has been through many of the other books.
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    8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By W Boudville HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 28, 2003
    Format: Paperback
    The alphabet soup subtitle gives a clue as to the book's heft: "XML, SOAP, WSDL, UDDI, WS-I, JAX-RPC, JAXR, SAAJ, JAXP". All these can be effectively summarised by the phrase "Basic Profile 1.0". This is needed for interoperability of any web service application you might be developing. It is a set of rules telling how to use XML, WSDL, SOAP and UDDI to make your application available as a Web service.
    If you don't know these 4 items, then basically you need to read most of the book, before being able to deploy an application. The chapters span 733 well written pages (plus there are large appendices). So be warned, it is not trivial to develop a Web service. The clarity of the writing helps assimilation, but the sheer bulk of the text seems necessary.
    On the positive side, now with BP 1, if you conform to it, your application should indeed work in a diverse environment. Such could not easily be said prior to it. Along the way, you may certainly wonder if the large amount of material needed to be understood is indicative of a still developing field. This barrier may be the single greatest impediment to Web service development. Certainly not the author's fault. He is explaining industry-wide agreed upon standards. Though in the last chapter, he does suggest along these lines that XML deployment descriptors used in J2EE are far too bulky and brittle.
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