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JOYCE OF COOKING Paperback – January 1, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 252 pages
  • Publisher: Barrytown/Station Hill Press, Inc. (January 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0882680811
  • ISBN-13: 978-0882680811
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.9 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,618,036 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

A nice sidebar to the vast literature devoted to James Joyce. Armstrong, noting that the novels are full of food, has collected traditional Irish recipes and given them titles and epigraphs based on the words of the master, most often from Ulysses I Beg Your Parsnips, Do Ptake Some Ptarmigan, Poached Eyes on Ghost. Recipes seldom partake of these flights of fancy but are straightforward dishes of a kind ordinary Dubliners like Leopold and Molly Bloom would have eaten in 1904. A jeu d'esprit that Joyceans will enjoy. RD
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Currently teaching in the Dept. of Humanities & Sciences at School of Visual Arts in New York City [since 2003], I have written my Masters' thesis and my Ph.D. dissertation on work by James Joyce. In the interim, I have taken part in various interanational James Joyce Symposia (in Dublin, Zurich, Trieste...) as well as other Joyce conferences (Venice, Italy; Bertinaro, Italy; Provincetown, NY; Philadelphia, PA....). At my current teaching position as well as in previous schools I have taught the literature of James Joyce over the years to students of varied backgrounds. I have been a member of the James Joyce SOciety of New York since 1981, as well as of the James Joyce Foundation...and co-founded the James Joyce Broadsheet with Pieter Bekker and Richard Brown in the apartment of Dr. Fritz Senn in Zurich (at that time in Unterengstringen during the 1979 International James Joyce Symposium hosted by ETH in the city of Zurich at which I chaired a panel of Joyce scholars that included Pieter Bekker, Maud Ellmann, Valentine Cunningham, David Lodge, and George Sandalescu. I have also reviewed very many books about Joyce for Irish Literary Supplement to which I am a co-editor (since 1982) and for James Joyce Broadsheet and may continue to do so. Any other details you might like should be addressed to me personally at: endlessmountainsbooks@yahoo.com
I do not Tweet and I do not Blog.
Please Note: There is another female writer out there in the world (and on Amazon which has been advertising my book, The Joyce of Cooking, with her bio and her photo) who has the same name as myself; she in particular writes self help books about relationships with men; this is not me. And there are others who share the same name who are not either one of us.
Please also note that I have a second book, published 1993 by Cornell University Press, a volume in their series on The Manuscripts of W. B. Yeats. The title is: "The Herne's Egg," by W.B. Yeats, the Manuscript Materials. I am the editor and textual scholar (and not the "author" although I did write all of it including scholarly introduction and notes to my transcription of the manuscript materials in the National Library of Ireland, as well as some typescript materials that turned up in the Scribners' collection at HRHRC at Univ. of Texas Austen.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 1, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is a great book both as a simple cookbook (best oxtail soup recipe I've found) and just for fun. It takes the dishes mentioned in ULYSSES and gives recipes as well as putting them in the context of the book. Most of the recipes are period; no microwaves here. But I'm no great cook, and I've found that I can do just fine with most of the recipes, though many are too time-consuming for everyday use. But for special occasions, the recipes are wonderful to actually use and the rest of the time the book provides a historical reference and insight into Joyce's masterpiece.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on February 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
For a lover of literature and food, for a lover of Joyce, and for lovers in general, this book will delight... it is the most unusual, pleasurable cookbook I use, and there is none that rivals its title (except one)? It deserves to be set right next to the more well known "Joy..." on any kitchen shelf. It's an amazing gift for literary friends, and I have found that most people don't know about it. Every recipe is accompanied by a quote from Joyce where the food is mentioned in one of his novels or short stories. My copy has lovely kitchen stains all through it--as I have made so many things many times. My favorite is the delicious "Molly's Seed Cake" the ultimate psychological and culinary dessert. The recipes were lovingly researched, interviewing all over Ireland, and the author loves the work of James Joyce. A treasure. Every time I make anything in this book I have to get it out and pass it around the table. Truly a Joy(ce)!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on July 1, 2008
Format: Hardcover
But this book doesn't work on either level. As a cookbook the recipes are only half there, sometimes woefully flawed. You can tell this within the second recipe for marzipan violets, the ratios are off and the directions are horribly inadequate. Also, as a reviewer below noted, most of these recipes have quotes tacked on that seem arbitrary at best. I gave it two stars because it's fun to flip through, and for some people it's probably used like a coffe table book of abstract art, there to impress others as a signpost of taste. For the rest of us, save your money for other books and find the recipes elsewhere.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Loves Books and Music on March 12, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is a lovely book and personally I truly enjoy any such cookery book with a literary twist. Why on earth must some people feel duty bound to make political statements at the drop of the proverbial hat? Get off your soap box. This is a cookbook for lord sake and I'm fairly sure that Mr. Joyce did eat from time to time and benefited from it. Personally, I thought the idea was to learn more of traditional Irish fare whilst also getting a taste of James Joyce's works. Therefore, if this publication should inspire one to read more Joyce, then are we not all the better for having purchased the cookbook in the first place?
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. Scanlon VINE VOICE on November 10, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Not even ironic

This book collects a number of mainstream dishes and pats a quote and a title from Joyce on it like basil butter.

Readers of Joyce will remember Lenehan's plate of grocer's peas and vinegar from Dubliner's Two Gallants, or that collection's stir-about in The Sisters, or A Painful Case's corned beef and cabbage. But mostly the hunger inherited from the British stealing every scrap of food in Ireland, creating an artificial famine in the mid-1800's (during which time plenty of food was exported from Ireland to England: see the relevant histories here of which I have several) whose memory still held people from eating in peace and in the luxury described within this horrific book. People were kept too damned poor, and held further from the alleged sin of gluttony by a very oppressive church, believing an unfamiliarly full stomach must be a sin and a satanic possession.

Better the Joyce scholar read the several excellent commentaries on Joyce regarding the colonialist nature of Ireland under British oppression, including the Semi-colonialist Joyce, etc., etc. A good deal of Ulysses in fact is devoted to the cattle "trade" undergoing British imperialist piracy. Cattle were slaughtered by the British throughout Ireland in the name of battling "hoof and mouth disease" without any discernable symptoms (as Joyce directly states in Ulysses' Episode now called Cyclops), in order to maintain high market prices due to scarcity in London. Constantly in the travels walking around Dublin we see herds of cattle being marched off to British ships while the people of Ireland starve. And the hero of the novel, Mr. Bloom, a relatively well-off man, is left the inner organs only to eat in Ireland, the offal.
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