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(WAR) BY JUNGER, SEBASTIAN(Author)Twelve[Publisher]Hardcover{War} on 11 May -2010 Unknown Binding – May 11, 2010


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Unknown Binding, May 11, 2010

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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Twelve (May 11, 2010)
  • ASIN: B0041JJTDK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (510 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,193,189 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Sebastian Junger is the internationally acclaimed author of The Perfect Storm, which spent over three years on the New York Times bestsellers list and was the basis for a major motion picture starring George Clooney. He is also the author of the New York Times bestsellers Fire and A Death in Belmont. He is a contributing editor to Vanity Fair, and has been awarded a National Magazine Award and an SAIS Novartis Prize for journalism. He lives in New York City.

Junger's time in the Korengal is also the subject of the documentary feature film Restrepo, which Junger directed with award-winning photographer Tim Hetherington. Restrepo, which won the 2010 Grand Jury Prize for documentary at Sundance, will be released theatrically as a National Geographic Entertainment presentation of an Outpost Films Production in July, and will have its worldwide television premiere on the National Geographic Channel this fall.

Customer Reviews

Very well written and easy to read.
mtlivi
WAR --As Soldiers Really Live It by: Sebastian Junger My hope is that when people read my book, they'll understand that emotional territory better.
P. H. Foley
If you are familiar with Junger's other book, "The Perfect Storm" then you know his writing is great, very informative, and with no fat.
Alex

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

403 of 414 people found the following review helpful By Howard Goldowsky on March 4, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Sebastian Junger is the well-known author of The Perfect Storm and A Death in Belmont. He is also a world-class war correspondent with over a decade of experience. This book is the product of five months spent embedded with a platoon in U.S. 2nd Battalion in the Korengal valley, Afghanistan. For five months, Junger existed like a regular soldier in the U.S. army: He ate MREs, went on patrol, took cover when the bullets started to fly. As Junger likes to explain in the book, he was the target of the same bullets as the other men in the platoon, and he had the same responsibility to Army rules. Even one broken minor rule risked lives. Junger remained vigilant, won the companionship of these soldiers, and garnered enough of their trust to record their thoughts and beliefs about what it's like to be in combat. That's what this book is about. The war in Afghanistan happened to be just a convenient location to do field research. At one particular scary moment, Junger was in a Hummer that got hit by a roadside bomb. The bomb exploded under the engine block, ten feet away. The blast shook Junger's emotions for days. Needless to say, this book was almost never written.

Good thing it was. Junger provides excellent war correspondence, describing combat as a first-hand observer. Junger's prose remains apolitical, his goal to show the reader what it's like to be in battle, not make a political statement. The book is broken into three sections: "Fear," "Killing," and "Love." All three sections describe combat, but each section is loosely structured around its theme.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
There aren't many books that really tell the reader what it means to be in battle. Those that have been there don't feel comfortable trying to explain it to those that haven't. As more than one combat veteran has told me, "you just wouldn't understand." Most reporters, even those embedded in a war, haven't really experienced what it means to bean active participant in battle- trying to kill someone before he kills you. There are some very good books about what it's like to be in the middle of a war, like Bernard Fall's Hell in a Very Small Place; Fall was a French reporter who was there at the siege of Dien Bien Phu. But even though Fall could describe what it felt like to survive the incessant shelling and attack on the base, he wasn't a combatant. He was still a reporter, an observer.

Sebastian Junger is a writer of rare skill who can paint a frighteningly real picture of places few of us would ever think of going. His first book, The Perfect Storm, gave readers a taste of what it would be like to be on a doomed fishing boat in the North Atlantic, at from home, at the mercy of the sea. In War, he takes the reader to an Army outpost in Afghanistan, where Junger and filmmaker Tim Hetherington spent five months over the course of a year and a half with a platoon of young soldiers, fighting a war that we've all read about, but that few of us can imagine.

This isn't the tourist war reporting we're used to, where the embedded reporter rides along at the rear of an armored column; Junger puts himself in a situation where he runs all the risks of the soldiers he's reporting on, including getting blown up by an IED that is detonated under the Humvee he's riding in.
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52 of 57 people found the following review helpful By Chase Powell on June 25, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a pretty good book - certainly eye-opening - but didn't quite match up to my read of "The Good Soldiers" last year (by David Finkel).

That War's author, Sebastian Junger, chose to spend 5 months in the fiercest combat in Afganistan is very impressive and deserves a lot of credit. He also included exhaustive footnotes supporting research he cites. What comes through well is the violence the men faced every day, the extreme living conditions, the losses taken and imposed on the enemy, the brotherhood formed within the platoon. He is admirably apolitical (as are his subjects) even as he honors the soldiers he lived with.

What didn't come through to me was a personal connection to any of the soldiers. The book felt disorganized, like a lot of unrelated scenes strung together, making it tough to follow the action or see how soldiers changed or grew over time.

Also, a photographer was embedded with Junger almost the whole time, but there are only three photos in the book (all on the jacket). A few more images and a map or two of the area would have been a huge help to the reader in visualizing the soldiers, the geography, and the firefights. (The documentary film of the book just came out, called "Restrepo." I'm eager to see it, but would have been nice to have a few pics in the book to whet the appetite.)

In all, War is good, but if you're going to read just one of these two books about modern-day US soldiers' experience in combat, I'd recommend The Good Soldiers. It is set in Iraq instead of Afganistan, but the timing and issues are similar. And you get to know the soldiers personally - including the gut-wrenching feeling when one of them is killed or injured.
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