Jackie's 9 and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$7.49
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Used, but looks brand new. Only very slight signs of use. Cover and binding are undamaged, and pages are crisp and unmarked. Unbeatable customer service, and we usually ship the same or next day. Over one million satisfied customers!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Jackie's Nine: Jackie Robinson's Values to Live By Hardcover – May 1, 2001


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$7.19 $0.01

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Top 20 Books for Kids
See the books our editors' chose as the Best Children's Books of 2014 So Far or see the lists by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12 | Nonfiction

Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 1040L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 181 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Inc.; First Edition edition (May 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0439237645
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439237642
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.7 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,711,767 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Robinson pays tribute to the values that she believes exemplified her father's life in this rather choppy collection of pieces, the majority of which have been published in earlier books. In chapters devoted to each of these nine principles (courage, determination, teamwork, persistence, integrity, citizenship, justice, commitment and excellence), she includes an entry by or about her father, a recollection of what she considers a memorable event in her own past and an article by or about an individual from among what she describes as her "heroes courageous men and women who have touched me personally." Entries in this last category include an excerpt from Christopher Reeve's autobiography, a portion of Bruce Markusen's biography of Roberto Clemente and an excerpt from Martin Luther King Jr.'s A Testament of Hope. The author draws extensively from her father's I Never Had It Made, an autobiography as told to Alfred Duckett; as well as her own Stealing Home: An Intimate Portrait of Jackie Robinson, published in 1996. The result feels a bit cobbled together; through the amalgam of voices, it is Jackie Robinson's, rather than the author's, that emerges as the most compelling. Still, middle graders may well find inspiring the life and words of this first African-American major-league ball player and Hall of Famer. Ages 10-up.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Gr 6-8-This personal tribute by a daughter to her famous father is meant to inspire young readers. Topics include courage, determination, teamwork, persistence, integrity, citizenship, justice, commitment, and excellence. Each chapter begins with a reflection by Sharon Robinson on her own life and then is followed by speeches, columns, and writings extolling the values of other role models. Some of the selections are from Jackie Robinson's autobiography; others include Carl Rowan's piece on the courage of the "Kentucky colonel," Pee Wee Reese; Brian Lanker on Oprah Winfrey; Bob Greene on Michael Jordan; and Christopher Reeve writing about himself. While the audience seems to be young people, at times the context seems more for adults. Marian Wright Edelman's essay on parents as mentors will not have wide appeal to young people. The book is full of warm duotone photographs, seemingly taken from the family picture album. Unfortunately, they are often hazy or lacking in contrast. However, the book does remind readers that there is still much to learn from Jackie Robinson, and it would be of value in ethics classes as well as to teachers interested in presenting materials on role models.

Edith Ching, St. Albans School, Mt. St. Alban, Washington, DC

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.


More About the Author

After a twenty-year career as a nurse midwife, Sharon Robinson shifted her focus to become an author and educational consultant for Major League Baseball (MLB). She has written five books about her father, including Jackie Robinson: American Hero (Scholastic, 2013) Jackie's Gift: A true Story of Christmas, Hanukkah, and Jackie Robinson with illustrator E.B. Lewis (Viking, 2010), Testing the Ice: A true story of Jackie Robinson with illustrator, Kadir Nelson (Scholastic, 2009). She has also written two middle-grade novels. Her next book, Under the Same Sun (Scholastic, 2014), features her mother and will be in bookstores January 2014.

In her work with MLB, Ms Robinson directs the national character education program: Breaking Barriers: In Sports, In Life. The program provides kids with stategies to deal with obstacles in their life. It culminates in a national essay contest with great prizes including laptop computers, school visits from Sharon, and a trip to MLB's All-Star Game! Now in it's 18th year, Breaking Barriers has reached over 22 million children. Sharon Robinson lives in Sarasota, Florida.

Learn more about Sharon and her books at www.sharonrobinsonink.com.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By John C. Haffner on July 13, 2001
Format: Hardcover
but I also seldom read a book this good. With chapters on Courage, Determination, Teamwork, Persistence, Integrity, Citizenship, Justice, Commitment and Excellence, this book can be read in one sitting or by the chapter (as each is an individual story). Some of the writing is Sharon's and some of it is Jackie's. Others contribute, including Roger Kahn, Christopher Reeve & Jackie's wife, Rachel. Baseball fans will enjoy stories detailing Jackie's initial meeting with Branch Rickey, stealing home in the World Series and his relationship PeeWee Reese. This is a great book to read with your children or to your children.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By R. L. Marquis on May 2, 2001
Format: Hardcover
In a thoughtful, sincere, approachable tone, Sharon Robinson offers young adults wonderful examples of character-building values based on nine by which her father lived his life in baseball, business, civil rights and at home. She has compiled this anthology of writings based on her own stories, her father's writings, and also writings by and about other notable individuals who she feels also embody Jackie Robinson's values. For any young adult looking for guidelines by which to model good behavior and for any parent looking for another means of imparting values on their children, this book is a welcomed addition to the family library. I would give it to any young adult I know.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on February 27, 2002
Format: Hardcover
It is Jackie Robinson's daughter Sharon who first came up with "Jackie's Nine" as part of an educational program called "Breaking Barriers: In Sports, In Life," an in school program supported by Major League Baseball, which used baseball-themed activities as teaching tools. These nine values are the ones that Sharon Robinson sees as being instrumental in her father's life, a subject which she has written about previously in her family biography "Stealing Home: An Intimate Portrait of Jackie Robinson." She picked nine because a baseball team has nine players and a game is nine innings long.

As far as I am concerned Jackie Robinson and Babe Ruth are the two most important sports figures of the 20th century from the perspective of their impact on society. My argument would be that the popularity of other athletes like Muhammed Ali and Michael Jordan are separate issues from their social significance. You can claim such stars are, in a way, the Babe Ruths of their day, and while Ali and Jordan may well be more popular around the world than the Babe ever was, Jackie Robinson has a legacy that can not even be approached, let alone be equaled (I remember that Larry Doby was the first African American to play in the American League, but I could not tell you who broke the color barrier in the NBA or NFL.). We can argue about who is "best," but who is "first" is a much easier argument to make.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 26, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Jackie Robinson was the first African American to play in Major League Baseball since the nineteenth century. He had to deal with much criticism and harsh environments because some of the United Sates was still segregated. Jack Roosevelt Robinson was born in Cairo, Georgia, on January 31, 1919, the youngest of five children of Jerry and Mallie Robinson. He grew up in Pasadena, California and lettered in football, baseball, basketball and track at UCLA. He was widely regarded as the finest all-around athlete in the United States at that time. After three years in the Army, he played with the Kansas City Monarchs of the American Negro Leagues in 1945. Later that year, in a historic move that ended decades of discrimination against blacks in baseball, he signed a contract with the Brooklyn Dodgers organization. After a successful season in 1946 with its farm club, the Montreal Royals, he became the first black player in the Major Leagues since the nineteenth century. I would really recommend this book because it is very interesting and has many morals in it.

I like this book because of the character traits shown. There are nine chapters in this book and each has one character trait. There are nine character traits: courage, determination, teamwork, persistence, integrity, citizenship, justice, commitment, and excellence, which are explained thoroughly. In each of the chapters there are three sections. Most of the time there is one written by the author, Sharon Robinson, one written by Jackie Robinson himself, and one written by another famous leader that elaborates on the character trait. They all give an example of them showing this trait and say how it is good.

I also like the stories told in this book.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?