Qty:1
  • List Price: $22.00
  • Save: $1.31 (6%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Jacksonian America: Socie... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Appears to have been read. Medium mark / wear on front cover. Small wrinkle / bend on front cover. Small mark / wear on back cover. Medium wrinkle / bend on back cover.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Jacksonian America: Society, Personality, and Politics Paperback – June 1, 1985

ISBN-13: 978-0252012372 ISBN-10: 0252012372

Buy New
Price: $20.69
13 New from $9.98 47 Used from $0.01
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$19.38
Paperback
"Please retry"
$20.69
$9.98 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$3.90

Frequently Bought Together

Jacksonian America: Society, Personality, and Politics + What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848 (Oxford History of the United States) + Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815 (Oxford History of the United States)
Price for all three: $48.44

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press (June 1, 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0252012372
  • ISBN-13: 978-0252012372
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.5 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,895,342 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
2
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Michael Wescott on April 13, 2005
Format: Paperback
In his Jacksonian America, Edward Pessen seeks to dispel what he sees as an unfair glorification of an era and a man, using harrowing statistics and anecdotes concerning the condition of "the common man" to support his thesis that the Jacksonian era was by no means egalitarian. He states that the era was one of "inequality, whether in material condition, status, opportunity, or influence and power." He further contends that the title of the era is a misnomer, in direct contrast with Page Smith, in that Andrew Jackson did not dominate the era in any historically responsible sense, and that it is ironic that an era that is named for a supposed champion of the common man was actually quite harsh for that segment of society.

The book opens with several chapters of social history, based predominately on the observations of foreign travelers and statistical information from domestic sources. The outlook is grim for large segments of society: the Irish, blacks -- free and enslaved -- any other poor, and women. Women (though many contented themselves with what is called the "cult of womanhood") are virtual nonentities in any legal or political sense; property is transferred to the husband upon marriage, and even in divorce due to the husband's infidelity (in those states where divorce exists), the property does not revert back to the woman. If a woman did not marry, she was a perpetual minor in the eyes of the law. Yet by age 25, she was considered an old maid. Free blacks and Irishmen, besides having to contend with extreme discrimination from others, not to mention ethnic riots, also endured a deep antagonism between each other, a by-product of job competition, among other things.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ed Gehead on December 5, 2010
Format: Paperback
I pity the poor students who are assigned to read this rambling, poorly written exposition on Jacksonian America circa 1825-50. Admittedly the book is packed with facts (many fascinating) depicting this period, but it is a difficult read because it sets forth conflicting data and rambles incessantly. This leaves the reader to do his own screening to separate out important information. What I also found disappointing is that the book fails to present an exposition on Jackson, the father of the modern Democratic party. Rather the book focuses on the political parties at the time (Democrats and Whigs) and their allegedly self-aggrandizing similarity. Pessen also devotes an inordinate amount of time arguing, non-persuasively, that America was and is not a classless society. I found the book a disappointment and cannot recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By dm on January 30, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book is by a "new historian" who hates andrew jackson. Pessen endeavors to psychoanalyze the citizenry and contradicts himself constantly while relying heavily on the observations/quotes of alexis de tocqueville. There is obviously a place for this materialistic take of jacksonianism and in that regard it is a more than thorough account. It is no coincidence Pessen chooses the $20 bill portrait for the cover of this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?