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Jaco

25 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: JazzDoor
  • ASIN: B0000281ZK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,103,979 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By obi odobi on June 18, 2001
Format: Audio CD
The negative reviews on this page simply prove that many of the lovers of so-called "jazz-rock fusion" lack any sensitivity to the language of "jazz." Jaco was certainly one of the greats, but like others of his generation such as Stanley Clarke, Al Dimeola and others, he was frequently capable of degenerating into empty displays of abundant chops. His compositions ran the gamut from the sublimely inspired to the pedestrian. Most of the showcases of his virtuosity find him in the light fusion or instrumental pop settings of Joni Mitchell or late Weather Report. Can Jaco's fans broaden their ears beyond the same old versions of "Birdland," "Teen Town," "Blackbird" and bad Jimi Hendrix imitations? In my opinion, there are very few documents of Jaco actually using his electric bass to play in what I would consider a real jazz context, and this CD gives us such a rare opportunity. The compositions range from abstract but composed works by Carla Bley and Annette Peacock, to free blowing sessions. Although all the musicians on this date are virtuosos, neither Jaco or any of the other players are going to blow you over with chops here, this is a session in which the players weave organic compositions with great sensitivity and group interplay. On the other hand, they do take solos which are excellent and musical. Paul Bley has gone on record saying that he feels this was one the first recordings to blend the language of late 60s free-jazz with electric instruments. In this light, the recording is a masterpiece and has much to offer. Ignore the simple-minded comments - there is a huge amount to love and learn from this recording. It is one of the great unsung works of electric jazz.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 30, 1999
Format: Audio CD
The brilliance of this album is that you get to hear all of Jaco's cliche lines (and you know which ones I'm talking about) before they became cliche. For those of you can't handle a Jaco album without Teen Town or Donna Lee, this one might not be for you. Another interesting thing about this album is that Pat Matheny comes off sounding like some sort of bastard child of Jimi Hendrix and a lot less like Pat Matheny. I think the compositions as a whole are a lot more interesting than on the famous "Jaco Pastorius" album. But that's just my opinion and most would probably disagree and say that tracks on this album for the most part ramble on, sort of like 1970-1975 Miles. But as with those important recordings by Miles, that may be the beauty of the compositions on this album. The compositions on this album are highly impressionistic and need room to breath and grow. Like all great works of art, such as Larry Sanders or The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, every listen of this album reveals something new and fresh--not something that I necessarily get every time I listen to the "Jaco Pastorius" album.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Gregory Murphy on November 28, 2001
Format: Audio CD
I am not sure the folks who gave this CD poor reviews bothered to listen to the actual CD. I tend to think maybe they just listened to the above samples, which could lead to a lack of interpretation. I find this album to be one of the more intense, edge of your chair types. The second side(LP), or Vampira to Blood are actually one continuous song. When played together, they are seamless, and almost nerve-racking. I don't think of this album as a waste of talent, I believe upon closer inspection it becomes clear this is a well conceived and executed album, a circus freak show for hardcore jazz enthusiasts. Right on to the reviewer who Jesus couldn't place syncopations like Jaco did. Jesus would be happy!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By joto on May 20, 2010
Format: Audio CD
For a while I've noted (with some bewilderment) a cache of negativity posted here with respect to this album. I've been playing it (on LP) for years and consider it a landmark jazz recording that is little understood and now virtually forgotten.

This date was essentially a Paul Bley release--a recording he made "secretly" and released on his Improvising Artist's label. But whether or not it was Jaco's date is not all that relevant. What is significant is that here --as elsewhere-- Bley possessed the instincts he showed throughout his career for appearing at the right time with the right people. Metheny and Pastorius were on the threshold of changes which would forever alter the vernacular of their instruments. The electric bass has never been the same since this album.

Bley, whose career began early in the 1950's on Mingus' Debut label has been one of the most overlooked piano players in modern times. His history of associations trace his many influences-- Mingus, Ornette, the much-overlooked reedman Jimmy Giuffre, and especially ex-wife Carla Bley and the composer Annette Peacock. As is the case with the writing of Carla and Annette, his mid-60's free playing was a key inspiration to many in the early phase of "fusion"-- a word which still meant something serious between 1968 and the mid-70's.

This is the album that charts that association.

It is also one of several seminal recordings for anyone interested in music from those years or anyone who rejects the notion that improvisational music ended when it "plugged in". The current ideology of neoclassicism which has lodged itself in some circles of jazz criticism dismisses most of the music of this period as inconsequential.
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