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Jacob's Courage: A Holocaust Love Story Paperback – March 15, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-9657344248 ISBN-10: 9657344247 Edition: 2nd Updated

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 524 pages
  • Publisher: MAZO PUBLISHERS, Jerusalem, Israel; 2nd Updated edition (March 15, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9657344247
  • ISBN-13: 978-9657344248
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.9 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,041,157 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Charles S. Weinblatt was born in Toledo, Ohio in 1952. He is a retired university administrator. Weinblatt is the author of published fiction and non-fiction. His biography appears in the Marquis Who's Who in America and he is a reviewer for The New York Journal of Books. He writes novels, short stories and articles.

Customer Reviews

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Weaving together a story of love, passion, horror, and history, Weinblatt left nothing out.
FrontierMommy
Jacob's Courage is a powerful story of how love does conquer all .No matter how hard the times are, love and humanity never lose their power.
Misha
It's a very good read, especially if you don't know much or anything about the Shoah (Holocaust).
R. G. S. Silten

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By R. G. S. Silten on June 28, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have just finished "Jacob's Courage" by Charles Weinblatt. It's a very good read, especially if you don't know much or anything about the Shoah (Holocaust). Some of the descriptions are graphic and not easy to read. And, I must unfortunately agree with "Nicholas II" that there are typos which are annoying. However, the book was written in English and proofread - presumably - in Israel where it was published. One has to assume that the proofreader did not speak English fluently. That is, of course, no excuse, but the typos are then understandable and will, I hope, be corrected in the next edition. I must also unfortunately agree with Nicholas II that some of the events did not happen when they were described in the book. For example: the "Yellow Star" was first worn in Lodz, Poland on November 16, 1939, and in Germany on September 1, 1941, whereas the Anschluss was in 1938. In Holland, where lived (I am a Jew) we had to wear the star as of April 29, 1942. Neither German nor Austrian Jews spoke much if any Yiddish. Most Germans and Austrians looked down upon the Yiddish language, considering it a sort of bastardized German which they were loath to speak. In Holland Yiddish was not spoken either, for the same reason. It is, however, indeed a language based on German, with Hebrew and Polish thrown in as well. One more thing: the word "Genocide" was not coined until 1944, by Raphael Lemkin, a lawyer and Polish Jew. Therefore Jacob and his father could not have thought the word in 1939; one cannot think of a word that does not yet exist. However, in spite of all that, it is a good book; it describes the Shoah (Holocaust) in graphic detail - perhaps too much so for some people. Both
Theresienstadt and Auschwitz are well described, as are the events there.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Noodle on October 22, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've read many, many Holocaust books but this is my least favorite. He said the same things over and over, and I did not think the book had a good flow. There were times that I was not sure what the time period was. He went back and forth with the characters and I could not tell if a week had passed or perhaps months. He had a good story but just could not pull it together. It should have been shorter. I finished it, but I was glad when it was done.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gisela Hausmann on June 9, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Stories are the best way to learn, even if they are fictitious stories based on real stories. With his book "Jacob's Courage" Charles Weinblatt answers most brilliantly one of the questions, which will linger forever: "Why did the Jewish population, at least the ones who could afford it, not leave what would be the Third Reich, when there was still time?"

Weinblatt's characters Jacob and his parents Moshe and Hanna belong to that group. While Hanna is always worried and wants to leave, Moshe, a well respected physician, just cannot believe that the rising Nazi regime will truly threaten the Jewish community. While certainly the situation will be difficult things just can't become as bad as his wife feels they might.

Their son, Jacob adores his father and wants to believe everything his father says. Jacob is also madly in love with beautiful Rachael, the daughter of one of his father's colleagues. If Jacob and his family would leave for another country, potentially he could not be close to Rachael. And, that is what 17 year old Jacob wants most of all.

All of them stay. Resulting from that misjudgment, their suffering begins.

Charles Weinblatt's vivid language is almost painful at times. That is because reading about societal failure is always extremely difficult. Inevitably, whether we were there or not even born when it happened, we have to ask ourselves the question, "What would I have done?" That goes towards all decisions, from "Would I have left on time?" to "What would I have done at Auschwitz?"

Charles Weinblatt's riveting book keeps the reader on his toes and serves as a warning that we have to pay attention, and how much our decisions matter at all times. It also shows that even under the most difficult circumstances we can rise to the occasion and make a difference. Jacob's and Rachael's beautiful love story is an encouragement to believe in a better world at all times.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on February 11, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was quite disappointed in the quality of the historical researching and the mediocre lackluster writing of this novel. Clearly the author means well, but he needs to take a course in Holocaust Studies before he updates this work or writes another. Among gross errors picked up- Salzburg, Austria never had a ghetto; there was no "Provisional Government" of Austria- Austria was incorporated directly into the German Reich after the Anschluss; Austrian Jews by and large spoke German not Yiddish- particularly in smaller communities like Salzburg, and it is unlikely there was a Chassidic community in Salzburg; Jewish doctors were thrown out of hospitals in Austria in 1938 after the Anschluss not as late as 1940; the wearing of the Jewish star was not mandated in Germany until September, 1941- not in 1939 as suggested in the book; the Anschluss was in March 1938 so it seems strange to say in the winter of 1939-40 that the Nazis had controlled Austria for less than a year. Lots of sloppy errors of this sort, evidence of very poor editing, and a general lack of knowledge about what actually happened in the Holocaust and when. A certain amount of historical license is allowed in historical fiction, but would one take a Civil War novel seriously that totally distorted the sequence of events of the war?
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