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Comment: This book is in LIKE NEW condition! The cover, spine, and pages are all BRIGHT & TIGHT!!! The cover does show very, very light storage wear. The pages are clean throughout, with only very, very light storage /browser wear. THIS IS A VERY NICE COPY!!!!
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Jacob's New Dress Hardcover – March 1, 2014


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 7 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 2
  • Lexile Measure: 400L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Albert Whitman & Company (March 1, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807563730
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807563731
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 8 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #80,764 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2—Jacob likes to play dress up with his friend Emily, but he prefers to pretend that he is a princess rather than a knight, firefighter, or policeman. The boys in his class tease him and wonder why he wears dresses. His teacher explains that "Jacob wears what he's comfortable in. Just like you do. Not very long ago little girls couldn't wear pants. Can you imagine that?" Jacob returns home from school to tell his mother that one of his classmates says that boys can't wear dresses. His parents support him as he makes his own dress with his mother's help, and she shares with him that "there are all sorts of ways to be a boy." An author's note explains how parents, educators, and counselors can make a difference in the lives of gender-nonconforming children. The warm cartoon illustrations convey the mood well and offer readers visual clues to the cruelty, teasing, and struggle with self-acceptance that can occur when children are different from their peers. Purchase this one to encourage discussions of gender, identity, and self-confidence.—Melissa Smith, Royal Oak Public Library, MI

From Booklist

Jacob wants to wear a dress to school, so he fashions one from a towel—a “dress-thing.” His mother tells him to add some shorts and a shirt, and off he goes to school, where he is teased by a fellow student, Christopher, who pulls the towel off and waves it “like a captured flag.” That evening, a tearful Jacob asks his mother to help him make a real dress, and after some thought, she agrees. Jacob’s father adds, “Well, it’s not what I would wear, but you look great.” At school, there’s more teasing, but Jacob finally tells Christopher, “I made this dress, I’m proud of it, and I’m going to wear it!” And so he does. In an afterword, the coauthors explain that Jacob is a “gender nonconforming” boy and that gender expression is inborn—not something we choose. The authors’ gentle but necessarily didactic story succeeds in dramatizing this concept. Case’s softly colored cartoonlike illustrations nicely expand the spirit of this important book, which—one hopes—will provide reassurance to children like Jacob and inspire thoughtful discussion. Grades K-3. --Michael Cart

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Customer Reviews

Love this book and its beautiful message.
J. Slipakoff
This is a wonderful children's book about diversity & acceptance.
Windy Kahler
I think this is a book to be shared with ALL children.
Books That Heal Kids

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Allison on April 21, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
My sister recently got this for my soon to be seven year old's birthday present. My kiddo loves pink and My Little Pony and Monster High and sparkly barrettes. When he read this to me, he got to page 2, where Jacob puts on a crown and says he'll be the princess, and my little boy's mouth fell open. "He's just like me!" I nearly cried. Thank you to the author, for writing my boy into a book.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mary Lavers on July 24, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Jacob is a little boy who loves to play dress up. He wants to be a superhero, a bird, and a princess. But some of the kids at school aren't very kind whenever Jacob wears a dress.

I love everything about this book. I love that even though it's a book "with a message" it doesn't allow the message to overtake good storytelling. It's not just a book you'd see on a school counsellor's shelf. It's a book you could read in a classroom or at home and children would enjoy it because it's a good book. Even if no one in the class is experiencing "gender nonconformity," as the authors describe, everyone knows what it's like to meet resistance for being different in some way. It's like the Stephanie's Ponytail for boys who want to wear dresses.

I also like that the book doesn't end with everyone embracing Jacob and his dress choices, because that's not realistic. In the book, as in life, there are kids who tease him for wearing "girl clothes" or tell him their parents think he's weird, but there are also kids and teachers who support him no matter what. And I think that's lovely.

It's not hard for me to imagine children just like Jacob. Whether a child grows up to identify as gay, straight, trans, or whatever, the pressure to conform to rigid gender norms as young children can be staggering.

And as a friend of mine (as well as fellow blogger and fellow parent) pointed out, "You may find support in encouraging your daughter not to wear princess dresses all the time, but good luck finding support if you want to let her brother wear them instead."

So bravo to the authors for creating an example of exactly that support!
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By PHW on February 22, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The five stars are from my six year old daughter, which says more than if they were just from me. She really gets it, that Jacob is being who his is, even when it's not easy. And the message of love and acceptance is one that our family, and our Unitarian Univeralist congregation, affirms and promotes - I'll be including Jacob's New Dress in our "Our Whole Lives" sexuality curriculum, which starts in Kindergarten and 1st grade, where we introduce the idea of the spectrum of gender (as well as talking about all kinds of families and all kinds of ways that children are brought in them.)

Thank you, thank you, Sarah Hoffman, and we look forward to more!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Books That Heal Kids on July 9, 2014
Format: Hardcover
This is such a supportive and wonderfully written book for gender nonconforming children. I was delighted to see it was published and can only imagine what a wonderful help it will be to children and families.

As a school counselor, I'd like to not just see this on my bookshelf but on the shelves in school libraries and teachers' classrooms. We are part of these kiddos support teams. We have a responsibility to educate kids that there is not a single thing wrong with gender nonconformity. Books have power and can teach acceptance. I think this is a book to be shared with ALL children.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By J. Slipakoff on May 15, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Love this book and its beautiful message. My son was thrilled to finally see a book where his uniqueness was reflected. So much of this sweet story was relatable to our family and I'm so grateful that it exists! For any parent of gender variant child, a parent of a child who has a gender variant child in their own child's class or just wants to teach their child about exploring and accepting differences in the world, this is a must read.

What I loved about the story was that Jacob's quest to wear a dress was successful. His mom and dad supported and his friends accepted him. Hopeful and loving - a message that we should all be teaching!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David's Wife on April 20, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a well-written, beautifully illustrated book about a boy who liked to wear dresses. I love that his parents, even though they were not sure if they should let him wear a dress to school, supported him and his mother even helped him to sew his own dress. I think that this is a great book for children to read and to learn that it is ok to dress the way they want to. It helps children learn to accept one another and themselves. I received this book free to review from Netgalley.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By H. Baskin on February 6, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I don't want to go spoiler on potential readers, but not only does Jacob get to wear a dress -- as *he* wants to do, he gets his friend's support, his parents' support (and technical sewing assistance) and his teacher's support. Ultimately, he is able to offer support to the children who do not understand him. What a gift--a book my daughter knew to be true and one that made me just a little happy teary. Win-win. I am going to buy some more copies: one for our (now former) preschool, one for our kindergarten, and one for my nephews ages four, two and one.
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful By ECrane on February 6, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love Jacob and his new dress.

It's tough to be the kid in the group who doesn't toe the line in some way. For Jacob, it's his desire to wear a dress. Thank goodness he is surrounded by loving and thoughtful adults who carefully allow him to express himself and help him find the strength to say (in essence) to his detractors, "I am myself and proud of it."

The authors tell the story in a way that is both heart-stoppingly real (how Jacob finds it hard to breathe when he is waiting for his parents' reactions) and aspirational (that Jacob is so effortlessly happy so quickly can only happen in books). The illustrations are colorful and joyful, like Jacob himself.

Best of all, Sarah and Ian Hoffman have turned a seemingly single-issue book into a series of universal truths: love and support who your kids are, help people be their best selves, there are lots of ways to be a boy/girl/person, embrace diversity, be fearless in yourself -- the empowerment message goes on and on, but it's so gently and lovingly administered, the reader drinks it in without resistance. Delicious.
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