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Jacob's Room Paperback – November 13, 2013

ISBN-13: 978-1461039624 ISBN-10: 1461039622

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (November 13, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1461039622
  • ISBN-13: 978-1461039624
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 0.3 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,052,831 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Woolf's 1922 experimental novel here joins Dover's "Thrift" line of bargain classics. This is still a popular item in lit classes, so have a few extra copies on hand; this is the cheapest way to fill the demand.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Review

Impressionistic novel by Virginia Woolf, published in 1922. Experimental in form, it centers on the character of Jacob Flanders, a lonely young man unable to synthesize his love of classical culture with the chaotic reality of contemporary society, notably the turbulence of World War I. The novel is an examination of character development and the meaning of a life by means of a series of brief impressions and conversations, stream of consciousness, internal monologue, and Jacob's letters to his mother. In zealous pursuit of classicism, Jacob studies the ancients at Cambridge and travels to Greece. He either idealizes or ignores the women who admire him. At the end of the novel all that remains of Jacob's life are scattered objects in an abandoned room. (The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature )

Woolf's 1922 experimental novel here joins Dover's "Thrift" line of bargain classics. This is still a popular item in lit classes, so have a few extra copies on hand; this is the cheapest way to fill the demand.
(Library Journal ) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

VIRGINIA WOOLF (1882-1941) was one of the major literary figures of the twentieth century. An admired literary critic, she authored many essays, letters, journals, and short stories in addition to her groundbreaking novels.

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Customer Reviews

This IS literature at its best.
Toisha Tucker
Virgina Woolf's writing style is convoluted and her descriptions are often like the writing equivalent of an impressionist painting.
Douglas P. Murphy
It's also very dense, full of different narrators, and at many times difficult to follow and slow to get through.
Megan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

66 of 67 people found the following review helpful By M on November 21, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is the first Virginia Woolf book I've read and I can see why she is ranked as a great writer. Her writing is very dense and the prose reads like poetry. She writes Jacob's Room in the stream of consciousness style, like Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce. The stream tends to meander all over the lot, so just go with the flow. The reader hears snippets of conversation and characters come and go. We learn about Jacob Flanders, but in little bits, here and there, the way you learn about people in real life. The reader never knows what's going on inside Jacob's head. You observe Jacob the way you would in real life: from the outside. Size him up for yourself.
The novel is set around World War I and Jacob Flanders (FLANDERS, as in Flanders' Field--World War I's killing field) is one of that Lost Generation. The novel is dark, questioning the futility of life, but the language is beautiful and the emotion is stabbingly true. Definitely read it, but have something more chipper around to read afterward, lest you brood too much.
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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Joy Kim on October 9, 2000
Format: Paperback
_Jacob's Room_ marks Virginia Woolf first truly experimental novel. It follows the elusive figure of Jacob Flanders, from his boyhood to college and finally off to the Great War.
It is a novel where plot and typical "defining" events are irrelevant. This is not a story about who dies, who lives, who loves, or who hates. This is a novel about interiority, about the effect Jacob has on those he meets. It is interesting to note that the character of Jacob Flanders was (in part) based upon Virginia Woolf's own brother, Thoby Stephen, who died quite young. While it is dangerous to overread the connection between Jacob and Thoby, it's highly probably that part of the novel's elegaic tone comes from it. Woolf's prose is typically lyrical, and she depends heavily upon interior monologue and stream-of-consciousness writing.
It's not an easy novel to read, especially Woolf novices, but I think fans of modern fiction will find the experience worthwhile. Better introductions to Woolf's works are _Mrs. Dalloway_ and _To the Lighthouse_.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 29, 2002
Format: Paperback
Virginia Woolf is one of my favorite authors and Jacob's Room is my second favortie Woolf book (The Waves being the first).
Jacob's Room is the highly impressionistic story of Jacob Flanders, a character based on Woolf's own brother. This is a coming-of-age story as we follow Jacob from the rocky coasts of Cornwall to the sun-drenched shores of Greece.
Anyone looking for a conventional story or plot won't find it here. Jacob's Room is Virginia Woolf during a highly experimental stage; a stage during which she was developing her pure stream-of-consciousness style.
Jacob's Room is for very "literary" readers. This is definitely not light and fluffy and it's definitely not going to be everyone's cup of tea. Those who love good literature, however, will find Jacob's Room a pure poetic masterpiece of the highest order.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Warren Keith Wright on April 15, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Jacob's Room" was Woolf's third novel, but the first where she felt free to trace "the flight of the mind" and discard any dead conventions which did not help convey her vision. Nor is there any elaborate stream-of-consciousness, in the late Henry James or Proustian manner: the real world is set before us with effervescent sensory detail, in that terse, suggestive, and witty style which makes her letters and essays so engaging. We are shown what life was like for Jacob Flanders, his adventures, friendships, travels, loves, right up to its abrupt ending: "It's not catastrophes, murders, deaths, diseases, that age and kill us; it's the way people look and laugh, and run up the steps of omnibuses." There isn't a dull page, and it reads as fresh and fast as if it had been written tomorrow morning.

The special feature of this Signet Classic is the introduction by Regina Marler, which offers one pertinent quotation or observation after another to orient the first-time reader, or refresh a return visitor. Her short course in the varied achievements of the Bloomsbury Group, those friends central to Woolf's development, is both assured and nuanced. Her placement of "Jacob's Room" in Woolf's career and the literary temper of the times shows how it anticipates the novel of the future while reflecting the recent painful past---the Great War that had ended just four years before it was published in 1922. Signet has given the text a very handsome presentation, and the up-to-date suggestions for further reading make one itch to visit the library. Woolf tempts us to "Think of a book as a very dangerous and exciting game which it takes two to play at"---and Marler furnishes the context we need to play along.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 17, 1998
Format: Paperback
From Woolf's innumerable unfinished sentences and unaccounted for colors, we begin to see that there are no traditional themes or plots, and she has not set down to cement a story from the point of view of her subject. At the beginning of the novel, and throughout, everyone is looking for Jacob, and he cannot be found. We learn little or nothing about his life except what seems like scattered thoughts and phrases, and learn more about who he is from where he is not than where he is. By not being tied down to one theme or the traditional explanation and nature of having this fixed subject, Woolf is then able to attack, from outside-in, the hollowness and darkness she sees before her. She sees the fractioning and diverging "chasm in the continuity of our ways", and wonders what it would be to let go of this driving thing that makes it necessary to fix her narrative on one subject in her book. By bringing in endless new characters, and then leaving them, she tries to approach the manner by which we know our subjects of observation. "The young man in the chair is of all things in the world the most real, the most solid, the best known to us - why indeed? For the moment after, we know nothing about him." This is how we float through our lives, seeing these subjects of people andn pathways, moving around countries and eras in our internal time, without a fixed linearity. Since Woolf has seen that assumed "core" of linearity in the traditional Victorian novel crumble into dissolution, she looks at that darkness and tries to find what is real about it. What ends up glittering in her flashlight of exploration is this possibility of pathways, and a realization of what is real. She wants to start catching reality the way we live it.Read more ›
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