James (Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$20.46
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.99
  • Save: $9.53 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 14 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Trade in your item
Get a $5.58
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

James (Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament) Hardcover – November 30, 2008


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$20.46
$15.37 $15.75


Frequently Bought Together

James (Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament) + The Letter of James (Pillar New Testament Commentary) + The Letter of James (New International Commentary on the New Testament)
Price for all three: $81.84

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (Book 16)
  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan (November 30, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310244021
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310244028
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 7.5 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #154,370 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Clinton E. Arnold (PhD, University of Aberdeen) is Dean and Professor of New Testament at Talbot School of Theology in LaMirada, California.



Craig L. Blomberg is distinguished professor of New Testament at Denver Seminary. He holds a PhD from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland. He is the author, co-author or co-editor of fifteen books and more than 130 articles in journals or multi-author works. A recurring topic of interest in his writings is the historical reliability of the Scriptures. Craig and his wife Fran have two daughters and reside in Centennial, Colorado.



Mariam Kamell (PhD, University of St Andrews) is a post-doctoral fellow at Regent College, Vancouver. She has published several articles on James focused on its economics or in comparison with Hebrews or 1 Peter; her dissertation focused on soteriology in James in comparison with earlier Jewish wisdom literature and the Gospel of Matthew.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
4
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 16 customer reviews
I'm looking forward to getting the other commentaries in this series eventually!
Sean Guthrie
The thematic outlines gives the reader a big picture of the epistle, while the exegetical outline highlights detailed parts of each verse/sentence, indents and all.
Shane Lems
I very much recommend this as a unique and helpful commentary on the shelf of pastors and Bible teachers.
M. Farrell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Russell Gaulke on December 19, 2008
Format: Hardcover
For those pastors like myself who have enough Greek to make themselves dangerous, this new series is great.
I could not believe that the text was analyzed using sentence diagramming. What a concept! There are also concise summaries at significant junctures in the text.
Those of you familiar with Blomberg's skill as a scholar and expositor will not be suprised to find this is a great commentary.
You will not be buried in details, yet there is real meat here, interaction with current scholarly discussions, and support for why the author makes exegetical decisions.
I look forward to other volumes in this series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Marcus Maher on December 18, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The layout of this series is unique and very helpful. One concern that I had seeing the commentary proper split into so many sections, was that there would be substantial overlap of material. My fear proved to be unfounded. The authors and editors did a stellar job at fully utilizing the format. I also must say that they hit their intended audience dead on. The amount of technical information was just right. They don't bog you down with gobs of detail on minutiae, but there's enough to inform you on important matters, whether they be grammatical, lexical, or of cultural/historical background.

As for the contents of the commentary, again I was quite pleased, though, of course, certain elements of the commentary were better than others. The introduction was brief but helpful. It covered the usual topics, such as authorship, dating, and the circumstances prompting the letter taking traditional stances and giving reasonable defense for their positions. Blomberg and Kamell also spent several pages explaining the overall structure of James. I found this to be the most beneficial section of the introduction as I've always struggled to see an overall cohesiveness to the letter. They argue in the introduction (and defend in the commentary proper) that the entire letter focuses on three themes: trials, wisdom, and riches and poverty. These are introduced initially in 1:2-11, reiterated in the same order in 1:12-27, and then developed at length in reverse order from 2:1-5:18.

Of the three main topics of the letter, I most appreciated Blomberg's and Kamell's discussion of wealth and poverty. Much of what James says on this topic sounds so harsh that it's easy to say that he didn't really mean it that strongly. Blomberg and Kamell don't go down that path.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By M. Farrell on May 17, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a commentary, I would rank this second to Luke Timothy Johnson's Anchor Bible commentary. It's quite different, focusing less on introductory issues and classical literature, and more on practical theology. The introduction is much briefer yet includes a helpful summary of the structure of James discerned by the authors, and some discussion of typical issues such as authorship.

Two main features were particularly helpful to me in teaching James throughout this year: (1) the presentation of structure with carefully worded interpretive descriptions that help the student grasp the overall flow of James; (2) the 'Theology in Application' sections that give suggestions for how to embody the text.

Finally, though I am competent in Greek, one last feature may be helpful for others, namely, that though the exegetical discussions include the Greek text, it is presented in a way that knowledge of Greek is not necessary making this commentary useful for wide readership.

I very much recommend this as a unique and helpful commentary on the shelf of pastors and Bible teachers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 25 people found the following review helpful By John Umland on December 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I received this copy for free on the condition of a review from me. I was very excited to receive a commentary for review. I was even more excited that it was on James which I had been studying with my church's young adult group this autumn. There were questions from the group we couldn't answer, and I hoped some of them could be answered in this commentary. I have a bad habit when it comes to perusing new books and magazines. I tend to start at the end and work towards the front. At the end, I encountered a goofy statement, which I will specify later, that put a bad taste in my mouth. So I realized I need to start at the front of the book. I know that it's hard to write at the end with the same passion and clarity that one started with in the beginning, and that I had to let them show me their best efforts in the beginning. I was rewarded.

The introduction to the series informed me that this was a commentary for someone who know Koine Greek and would like to see it applied in Bible interpretation. But it also promises to stay out of the weeds, so that the busy pastor can get enough meat for his own devotional study as well as enough to share with his congregation. As someone trying to retain his NT Greek, but unable to retain his Hebrew, I was happy that the format keeps the greek, but transliterates the Hebrew. It felt like this series is for people like me. This is good. It also explains the layout for each section of Bible discussed, e.g. literary context, main idea, translation and graphical layout, structure, exegetical outline, explanation of text, and, finally, theology in application. Frequently, the authors for this epistle, often left the section under translation empty and referred to the graphical layout. Literary context and exegetical outline also overlapped greatly.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?