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Jamming the Media Paperback – October 1, 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 353 pages
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books; 2nd edition (October 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811817954
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811817950
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 7.9 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,283,759 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Branwyn gamely resolved to compile--in print, mind you--nothing less than a permanent, accurate, and reliable resource for all producers of alternative media…. You find yourself wanting terribly for him to succeed and--given the constraints--so he does. -- Wired, Ken Coupland

More About the Author

Gareth Branwyn (born January 21, 1958) is a writer, editor, and media critic.

He has covered technology, media, DIY, and cyberculture for Wired, Esquire, the Baltimore Sun, Details, and numerous other publications. He was an editor at Mondo 2000 and Boing Boing (when it was a print zine), founded the personal tech site, StreetTech.com, and worked for MAKE magazine for 8 years, lastly acting as their Editorial Director.

Gareth co-edited The Happy Mutant Handbook (with Boing Boing) and is the author of Jargon Watch: A Pocket Dictionary for the Jitterati, Jamming the Media, The Absolute Beginner's Guide to Building Robots, and Mosaic Quick Tour: Accessing and Navigating the World Wide Web (the first book written about the Web). His most recent book, a collection of his best work, with many new essays, is called Borg Like Me & Other Tales of Art, Eros, and Embedded Systems. The book was crowd-funded and self-published.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A. Saban on March 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
In his book, Jamming the Media: A Citizen's Guide Reclaiming the Tools of Communication, Gareth Branwyn writes about an alternative media, a Do It Yourself (DIY) media, where everybody can produce high quality messages from their desktops. He talks about every kind of medium from zines, which are noncommercial amateur publications, to the most modern multimedia technologies. In every chapter, he provides a "starter kit and resources" section to encourage the reader to experiment with the making of zines, music recordings, multimedia CD-ROMs, WebPages, TV, films, videos, radio and other kinds of bizarre media.
The media, as an institution, have changed their role to an interactive, public access space where everybody can participate. With passion and a particular writing style, Branwyn gives the recipe, step by step, of how to design, produce, package, distribute and promote written, audio, visual and even animate messages. Moreover, he opens the reader's mind to create a new kind of message full of feelings and expressions that crosses the barrier of conventional and commercial media. Talking about media pranks and art hacks, Branwyn affirms: "Anything that's out of the ordinary or worthy of a sound bite will find its way into the local and national media (albeit shoved into a little suffocating compartment)" (p. 248).
The author introduces his book giving an explanation on how the development of new technologies has contributed to the creation of powerful personal computers that can now be used as "a full-color publishing house, a broadcast-quality TV studio, a sound recording studio, or an island in the digital oceans of the cyberspace" (p.13). He then talks about zines, as an easy and funny way to get on the bus in this DIY media.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on October 20, 1998
Format: Paperback
SPREADING THE MEDIA JAM =======================
By ROY BLUMENTHAL (This review originally appeared in Gadget Magazine)
If you're keen on rolling up your sleeves and getting into communicating with the masses, a superb book guides you in the tactics being used on the frontline by some of the most experienced media hackers in the world today.
Browzing at Facts & Fiction in Sandton Square, pretending to myself that my credit card wasn't too over-flexed, I saw a title that stopped me in my tracks. Which meant I had to apologise to the woman who had been walking behind me. Once she had dusted herself off and checked for fractures, she made straight for the alternative health section. I was glued to the media shelf. The book Reclaiming the Tools of Communication" by Gareth Branwyn. Now call me a sucker or something, but I really do judge books by their covers. This cover was seductive, steeped in the new design made popular by Ray Gun magazine, precursored by the boundary-shifting Mondo 2000. We're talking about a cover that would even make a darn good web page.
So what's this book all about and why did it encourage me to spend four hours at the Facts & Fiction coffee table developing concentration scars on my forehead? In short, it's a do-it-yourself book on how to manipulate the media of today for profit, gain and fun..
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By icyclops on June 23, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First let me warn you that this book contains old technology and you probably only find a copy ot it used. But, this book is more about the thinking in using this technology which is still relevant to certin media we still use today. A very interesting read if not historicaly informational....The thought process and methods behind some of the examples are entertaining...cool flashback!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "francwas" on May 4, 2001
Format: Paperback
The media is rightfully ours. The airwaves are actually owned by the American people. (Here in the US) The FCC "lends" them out to companies, organizations and such. The corporate monsters have stolen the airwaves from the general public that gave it to them.
So, it is right that we should be able to use our first amendment rights to use the media to express ourselves.
Pirate radio or microradio, zines, public access television, the Internet, tapes and CD's. It is not about money, it's about expressing viewpoints.
This book shows us how. It's a bit old (1997), but it's still a good reference.
Free DC! (Taxation without representation is against the law!)
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