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Jancis Robinson's Wine Course: A Guide to the World of Wine Paperback


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Jancis Robinson's Wine Course: A Guide to the World of Wine + How to Taste: A Guide to Enjoying Wine + The Oxford Companion to Wine, 3rd Edition
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Abbeville Press; Rev Exp edition (April 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0789208830
  • ISBN-13: 978-0789208835
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 7.8 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #497,202 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

As elegant and meticulously laid out as a posh wine shop, this companion to the BBC series of the same title by Financial Times wine columnist Robinson brims with the kind of facts, advice and trivia that will likely enthrall aspiring oenophiles but may overwhelm dilettantes. Robinson, a congenial raconteur, divides this course into four long chapters, each providing a deep immersion into a different facet of the wine world?and each punctuated by splashy photographs and charts. "Getting the Most Out of Wine" demonstrates how to open, serve and order the stuff; "How Wine is Made" reveals how the grapes are harvested, fermented and bottled; the last chapters catalogue the hundreds of varieties of wine and the world's vineyards, from those in France and Italy to less prominent regions in Argentina, South Africa and New Zealand. The book is bursting with short glossaries and sidebars, addressing the esoteric (wine-scoring systems) and the pragmatic (pronunciation; varieties of corkscrews). A short vintage guide and an index are included, but no comprehensive glossary. Readers with income and patience enough for the trial and error that a wine education requires will find that this manual is best read over time, in conjunction with regular samplings of the wines showcased. The novice looking for a simple handbook to help navigate a wine retailer or a restaurant list may be better served by the Windows on the World Wine Course (see Notes, below).
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"An extraordinarily good wine education book." -- Wineskinny.com, June/July 2006

"Witty, brilliant, authoritative" -- Robert M. Parker, Jr., The Wine Advocate

She has an encyclopedic grasp of her subject and doesn’t put a foot wrong...a splendid introduction to wine. -- Decanter Magazine

More About the Author

One of a handful of wine communicators with an international reputation, Jancis Robinson writes daily for JancisRobinson.com (voted first-ever Wine Website of the Year in the Louis Roederer International Wine Writers Awards 2010), weekly for The Financial Times, and bi-monthly for a column that is syndicated around the world. She is also editor of The Oxford Companion to Wine, co-author with Hugh Johnson of The World Atlas of Wine, co-author of Wine Grapes - A complete guide to 1,368 vine varieties, including their origins and flavours, each of these books recognized as a standard reference worldwide.

An award-winning TV presenter, she is invited all over the world to conduct wine events and act as a wine judge. In 1984 she was the first person outside the wine trade to pass the rigorous Master of Wine exams and in 2003 she was awarded an OBE by Her Majesty the Queen, on whose cellar she now advises.

She loves and lives for wine in all its glorious diversity, generally favouring balance and subtlety over sheer mass.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 8 customer reviews
It takes the confusion out of tasting new wines and shopping for wine is now fun.
arusin
It is Jancis speaking to you, from her richly educated base of knowledge, to help you learn what makes wine so interesting.
Lisa Shea
The most useful part is the regional information - each major winemaking region is discussed, most in quite some detail.
PhotoJim@usa.net

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Lisa Shea HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 4, 2001
Format: Hardcover
There are many types of wine books on the market today. Some are the Dummy and KISS type - with little graphics and simple statements to start you from your first baby steps. Other are rich tomes with a wealth of information, like the Oxford Companion to Wine, which Jancis edits. These have just about every term and region you could hope to learn about.
This companion to Jancis' TV series is neither of the above, and it is much more. It is Jancis speaking to you, from her richly educated base of knowledge, to help you learn what makes wine so interesting. Think of Jancis as your incredibly experienced aunt, who has just come back from some exotic trip. She and you have sat down in the living room by a fire, are sipping some wine, and she is preparing to regale you with stories, and tidbits, and insights, and fascinating worlds you didn't even imagine.
That's what the book is like.
It starts with the basics - how to taste, how to serve, how to decant, wine and food. Even in these areas you get the sense that Jancis is chatting with you about something she loves. She admits to decanting full whites not because they need it, but because she loves the glowing color.
She goes into the gritty details of how wines are made, what a free-run-wine is, how sparkling and sweet wines are created. And then, she begins in on the regional reviews.
France, of course, is first. It always seems to come first. Beautiful pictures of the Chateau Latour tower and Loire valley gables. You move on through Italy, Spain, and yes, the US and Australia get a mention in here too. The reviews are all written from her heart - you see clearly what she likes and doesn't like, and you learn why.
A great way to learn more about wine - especially if you're also able to watch the TV Series!
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By tom@clariononline.com on December 16, 1997
Format: Hardcover
In what is truly one of the most informative and informal books on wine, Jancis Robinson, the only journalist ever to be given the title Master of Wine, takes you on a journey through this magnificent drink. </p>
As one who truly knows her craft, Jancis shows the reader everything needed to be able to make good decisions about wine. From a discussion about different wine glasses to the different regions where wine is made to the different grape varietals, Jancis lets it all hang out.</p>
Don't get me wrong, though. While Jancis is very informal in her discussion, she is decidedly British, so the text reads as if it were spoken with an accent. Some of the terms are British as well, so a little knowledge of the British way of speaking helps. For example, what Americans (and the French) call a Bordeaux, the English call a Claret. These little things might trip a true wine novice, but I'm certain that anyone who enjoys wine and wants to find out more will keep this book in the bookshelf (when not reading it) for a very long time.</p>
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By S. Sommerville on May 4, 2003
Format: Hardcover
If you are looking for a good book to start out with, to learn the basic ABC's of wine, then I would reccomend The Complete Idiot's Guide To Wine by Phillip Seldon. This one (Jancis Robinson's) however is good for people like myself who already know the basics (the distinguishing characteristics of grape varieties, the main regions, how to make reasonablly good food/wine pairings, etc.)
In other words, it's not the easiest book to follow.
Another note- she makes her disgust of Spanish wines known in the opening paragraph on page 222 when she says "If it (Spain) had Germany's love of efficiency, or France's respect for bureaucracy, Spain might be sending us oceans of judiciously priced wine made expressly for the international market. But Spain is an anarchic jumble of districts and regions...and heartbreakingly awful human constructions, and has to be treated as such by the wine enthusiast."
I found those comments to be misleading, as Spain to me is a model exporter of high quality wines. Just about any Rioja or Tempranillo wine imported and that goes for less than $...is of fine quality. That is my opinion of course. Another semi-complaint is that there was not enough material on Argentina (only 6 paragraphs) which I found to be a shame, since Argentina has very unique and delicious wines.
Overall this is good, as I said earlier, for those who already have a basic knowledge.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By PhotoJim@usa.net on October 7, 1997
Format: Hardcover
This book was extremely interesting. It covers the whole gamut of the wine hobby, from the technology of the cork and corkscrew :) to bottles to a useful synopsis of almost every variety of grape known to man. The most useful part is the regional information - each major winemaking region is discussed, most in quite some detail. A discussion of label reading is also quite useful. As a wine novice, I found the book to be very entertaining and refer to it regularly.
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