Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave Manor and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $7.99
  • Save: $0.80 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Used, but looks brand new. Only very slight signs of use. Cover and binding are undamaged, and pages are crisp and unmarked. Unbeatable customer service, and we usually ship the same or next day. Over one million satisfied customers!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave Manor: Being the First Jane Austen Mystery (Jane Austen Mysteries) Mass Market Paperback – December 1, 1996


See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.19
$2.73 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$3.00


Frequently Bought Together

Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave Manor: Being the First Jane Austen Mystery (Jane Austen Mysteries) + Jane and the Man of the Cloth: Being the Second Jane Austen Mystery (Being A Jane Austen Mystery) + Jane and the Wandering Eye: Being the Third Jane Austen Mystery
Price for all three: $21.57

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Bone Clocks
David Mitchell's hypnotic new novel crackles with invention and sheer storytelling pleasure. Learn more

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Crimeline; Reissue edition (December 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553575937
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553575934
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 4.2 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (79 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #469,352 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

In a time of near Jane Austen-mania, what better heroine to solve a mystery than Jane herself? Only two things are required: a satisfying, well-structured whodunit plot and a knack for rendering Austen's style at picking up the most delicate nuances in social behavior. Stephanie Barron succeeds on both counts. When the squire of a country manor in Hertfordshire is found lifeless in his bed, foul play is suspected and Jane is called upon to unravel the mystery. Along the way, Barron employs Jane as the first-person narrator and adeptly re-creates Austen's voice and delightfully subtle humor. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

With this series opener, Barron catches the Jane Austen popularity wave with impeccable timing?but that may be the best that can be said of this debut. Purportedly editing Austen manuscripts found in an old Maryland estate, Barron recounts the suspicious death of the elderly Frederick Payne, Earl of Scargrave. Anonymous notes accuse Isobel, Austen's friend and Payne's young bride, and a "grey-hared Lord" of murdering the earl. Intensifying Isobel's misery is Lord Harold Trowbridge, who badgers the widow to sell him her estate in Barbados. Concerned for her friend and for Fitzroy Payne, the new earl who not-so-secretly loves Isobel, Austen undertakes snooping that leads her to a second corpse and leads Isobel and Fitzroy to trial before the House of Lords. As Austen explores a passel of suspects who are heavy-handedly cast as the originals for the characters in her novels, the reader is offered imitation scholarly footnotes. To be truly helpful, Barron might have better explained how Austen hears Big Ben, a bell cast some 40 years after her death. Austen as mystery writer is an appealing idea, but inadequately served here. Author tour.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

STEPHANIE BARRON

Stephanie Barron is a graduate of Princeton and Stanford, where she studied history. THE WHITE GARDEN is her twentieth novel, but she is perhaps best known for the critically-acclaimed Jane Austen Mystery Series, in which the intrepid and witty author of PRIDE AND PREJUDICE details her secret detective career in Regency England. JANE AND THE MADNESS OF LORD BYRON, the tenth Austen mystery, is forthcoming from Bantam in October 2010. A former intelligence analyst for the CIA, Stephanie--who also writes under the name Francine Mathews--drew on her experience in the field of espionage for such novels as THE ALIBI CLUB, which Publishers Weekly named as one of the fifteen best novels of 2006. She lives and works in Denver, CO.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Sharon Wylie on May 29, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Stephanie Barron has created a delightful mystery series that captures the essence of Austen for a modern-day audience. Readers who know Jane Austen through only her novels (and not her letters, for example) may not always recognize Barron's sophisticated integration of fact with fiction, but anyone familiar with Austen's biography will surely enjoy the imagination and cleverness of this series. Mystery lovers and all but the most curmudgeonly of Austen fans will enjoy this well-written tale as well.
The first in the series, this book introduces Jane-as-sleuth along with the cast of supporting characters. Barron is true to Austen's character and life (as much as we know of it, anyway) and has written a solid mystery also. Thoroughly enjoyable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Sarah on October 30, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
My local library has the whole Stephanie Barron Jane Austen Mystery series. At first, I was a little put off by the language, and like a couple of other reviewers, thought the language more than a little affected. Yet Ms. Barron is trying to capture the style of Jane Austen, and that is no easy feat. Once I got over my initial reservation about the (overly prim and proper) writing style, I really enjoyed this book. Ms. Barron has obviously done her research and integrates many true accounts of Jane's life into these mysteries (I'm now on the second book, Jane and the Man of the Cloth). For example, Jane had recently recanted her promise to marry a Mr. Bigg-Wither, and the First Jane Austen Mystery takes place shortly after Jane's refusal and fictionalizes how Jane sought solace by visiting a newly married friend, the Countess of Scargrave (who will soon be framed for murder).

I'm not such a purist that I take deep, personal offense at Stephanie Barron's decision to interpolate quotes from Jane Austen's novels into these books, as though Jane was thinking them up at the moment or recording them in her letters and diary. (Some other reviewers thought this "borrowing" an unpardonable breach of copyright, if not moral probity). And you more than get the idea that our famous Darcy was based upon Lord Fitzroy Payne, the (unconsummated) love interest of the Countess of Scargrave. (Though he never was so tactless as to insult Isobel Scargrave's appearance.)

Jane isn't quite the infallibe Miss Marple--she puts many pieces of the puzzle together, but doesn't quite get it right til the very end, when the would-be murderer saves her life.

I really wish that PBS Mystery would produce this series. If it was well done, what a following it would have!
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By B. Spangler on December 30, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I was not sure what to expect when I took up "Scargrave". That the reviews fell left and right of a purists divide did not surprise me. That I would enjoy it so much for so many reasons, I did not expect.

I am not a Regency scholar. I have however read many works of "Regency" authors and felt bludgeoned by the text. Not with Barron. The words "bright" and "sparkling" come to mind (blasphemy?!). I was comfortable with the voice given to JA...it did not jar; rather it felt as I would imagine her in writing to her sister or her nieces.

I also am comfortable with Jane's behavior, which was questioned by other reviewers stressing her refinement, etc. That's as may be, but she proves in her writings to have a sarcastic bent and is frequently snarky. By her very nature as a published authoress, she pushed the Regency non-envelope. Retreating from a failed betrothal and called upon to defend the friend who took her in, I can see her rising to the occasion (though perhaps not wishing her name to attach to it.)

The mystery was satisfying enough to serve...I had only nailed it within about 50%. I especially liked the expansion (through footnotes) of some key concepts.

I'll make sure to read the rest, though I will say I hope the author does not continue to cast JA as an unrealized angel for all future cads and wastrels. She does not benefit from the tragic cast and it does not ring true.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By audrey TOP 500 REVIEWER on March 12, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
What a wonderful idea -- the astute and observant Jane Austen as amateur detective in the English countryside! Of late I have been underwhelmed by several Austen homages and a few mystery novels, but author Stephanie Barron seems to have got it right on both fronts. While no one has ever duplicated Jane Austen's combination of wit and elegance, of the recent authors Ms. Barron comes closest in my opinion, though I do find her occasional use of sentences lifted directly from the original works disruptive. You can tell that Ms. Barron did her research, and she fluidly incorporates people and events from JA's life into the story in an entertaining way.
In addition, the mystery is a good one, interesting and plausible. Personally I liked the footnotes, which are neither idiotic nor ubiquitous, as some have stated; there are approximately 40 notes, which are generally brief, informative and interesting -- and easily ignored if one so chooses.
I thought the one weakness of the novel was Isobel, Jane's friend and the accused murderess in whose interest Jane acts. She pouts and whines and is inconstant -- certainly not the kind of person one would imagine appealing to Jane. Otherwise, I thoroughly enjoyed this novel and will definitely read others in the series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search