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Java Enterprise in a Nutshell (In a Nutshell (O'Reilly)) Paperback – December 2, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0596101428 ISBN-10: 0596101422 Edition: 3rd

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Product Details

  • Series: In a Nutshell (O'Reilly)
  • Paperback: 896 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 3 edition (December 2, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596101422
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596101428
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6.1 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #537,555 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

For the intermediate to advanced Java developer, Java Enterprise in a Nutshell shows how to work with all of today's relevant Java APIs. Plus, it's a topnotch reference for all enterprise classes. Part tutorial and part reference work that you can use everyday at your desk, this title is a worthwhile resource for any Java developer building Web or enterprise software.

The practical, succinct focus here on actual Java enterprise APIs helps distinguish this text from the pack. Early sections provide short, clear examples along with just enough background to help you use APIs like JDBC, servlets and JSPs, EJBs, and others. Coverage of Java's ability to interface with legacy CORBA systems is just excellent, with a full tour of Java IDL, CORBA services, and Remote Method Invocation (RMI). Typically, readers will be familiar with some J2EE APIs and not others. This book can help fill in the gaps.

Updated with the latest standards from Sun, including JDBC 3.0, Servlet 2.3, and EJB 2.0, this is an essential primer for today's high-end (and high-paying) Java. The basic presentation of servlets/JSP and EJBs (among the most important APIs for current Java Web development) is concise and nicely digestible. We also liked the chapter on JMS for messaging (also a hotbed of Java job activity).

The second half of this text lists every J2EE class, along with methods and properties, in a very valuable reference section that makes good use of two-toned shading for easy access. Entries are organized by package name. (One small oversight here is that an index of cross-listed packages, classes, and methods omits page numbers.)

Overall, this book is truly indispensable for any working Java programmer. The second edition of Java Enterprise in a Nutshell is a fully up-to-date tutorial and reference that lives up to the standards of O'Reilly’s Nutshell series. Both thorough and concise, it's a handy resource for anyone who works with the hundreds and thousands of Java enterprise APIs on a regular basis. --Richard Dragan

Topics covered: Introduction to enterprise computing with the Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE), survey of Java enterprise APIs, JDBC 3.0 (including database connections, ResultSets, prepared statements, BLOB fields, transaction support, stored procedures), the JDBC Optional Package (and connection pooling), Remote Method Invocation (RMI) described (building stubs and skeletons, dynamically loaded classes and remote object activation, RMI over IIOP), in-depth tutorial for Java IDL (with CORBA) and designing remote objects, Java Servlet 2.3 APIs (basic servlet processing and the servlet lifecycle, chaining and filters, thread safety, managing state, cookies, servlets used with JDBC), JavaServer Pages (JSP): including custom tags, JNDI and directory tutorial (contexts, looking up objects, accessing and modifying directory entries), Enterprise Java Beans (EJB) 2.0 (conventions for entity, session and message beans, using transactions), Java XML APIs (DOM, SAX and XSLT), Java Message Service (JMS), point-to-point and publish-subscribe messaging models, message selectors, JavaMail, reference to SQL and relational databases, RMI tools, reference to all IDL keywords, data types and declarations; CORBA services, Java IDL tool reference, Enterprise JavaBeans Query Language (EJB QL) 2.0 query language, and an alphabetical listing of all APIs for Java enterprise programming (listing of classes, methods, and properties). --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

'It really is a useful Java Enterprise referenced and it deserves a place of honour on my desk.' - Steve Cornish, Cvu, May 2000. 'The API reference contains more information than the documentation which comes with the APIs themselves'... Java Enterprise in a Nutshell is a very good reference for the Java Entreprise APIs. The introduction already contains enough information to get started and the reference sections are very complete and useful.' - Hubert Klein Ikkink, Developers Review, February 2000. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

The chapters are well structured and very clearly written.
Eric Dubuis
'Java Enterprise in a Nutshell' by Jim Farley is a great reference book to examine the entire suite of Java enterprise tools and APIs.
Dan McKinnon
Although you can find most of the material in the JavaDocs, the book makes the information much more readily available.
D. Ortman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan T House on May 13, 2003
Format: Paperback
Disclaimer: I am an avowed O'Reilly technical series fan, and proud of it. Whenever I want to understand a new technology I head to the O'Reilly shelf in my local Borders before I look anywhere else. So adjust your expectations accordingly.
As the name implies, this massive tome (971 pages stem to stern) covers a mind numbing range of technologies associated with "Enterprise" Java software development. There are 17 sections in all, as well as your standard API reference pages. As you would expect, all of the usual suspects are there - Servlets, JSP's, EJB's, JNDI, RMI, CORBA, etc. In addition there were other enterprise technologies that I found useful as well - Messaging, SQL, Java Mail and so on.
When I sat down with this book my intention was to skim through each section, look to see if there was anything that they missed, and crank out the 'ol review. What I found was enough content in each of the technical sections to draw me into actually reading the whole section. I mean, who would take the time to read a full section on CORBA nowadays unless there were interesting things there (yes, I see all of you CORBA proponents shaking your fists out there - don't you have some IDL to write?).
Once I completed the reference sections I cracked open the latter half of the book to take a peek at the API section. I found it well organized, asthetically pleasing, and about as useful as a screen door on a submarine. Note that this API publishing is NOT unique to O'Reilly - It seems that most of the technical publishing companies still commit arboreal mass murder to publish these API sections. Note to publishers: When the half life of the information you are printing is measured in months, think about a different delivery mechanism.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Travis on October 18, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is absolutely indespensible for anyone programming Java Servlets, EJB, and CORBA applications. I do all of the above, so this reduces the weight of paper I need to carry around by tenfold. Clear, concise, correct.
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Wolfram Rittmeyer on August 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is the first O'Reilly-book I'm a bit of disappointed with.
"Java Enterprise in a Nutshell" simply ignores a lot of APIs/packages of the J2EE, like javax.servlet.jsp, javax.naming.event, javax.naming.ldap or the whole javax.mail-API, some of which surely have a great practical relevance. On the other hand it has a quick reference of SQL, something that does not really belong here. It wouldn't have disturbed me, if all relevant APIs had been covered, but they hadn't.
All covered APIs on the other hand are as good dealt with as always.
Because of the given shortcomings: just 3 stars.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By D. Heller on February 21, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is a great book... provides short descriptions of the technologies in the Java Enterprise Edition. For each one, covers the architecture, use, and provides examples... everything you need to get started (and for the JavaDoc to make sense). The explanations of the architecture of each technology is especially clear and well written. Also contains the necessary reference material for each technology.
This should be next to Java in a Nutshell on the bookshelf of anyone who uses any part of Java Enterprise.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By hyperbolium on May 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
While the latter 2/3 of the book make a fine reference, the first 1/3 provides an excellent overview of the technologies that make up Jave Enterprise. A good place to start to sort out JDBC, Java IDL, RPC, Servlets, JNDI, and the rest. The quick-moving world of Java, however, may quickly date this (e.g., no real coverage of JMS in this edition).
Valuable for anyone just trying to get a sense of what J2EE is, and what one might do with it.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By "schapel" on November 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book had the misfortune of being written before Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) was available. As a result, the book doesn't cover some of the packages in J2EE and refers to the packages not in J2SE as "standard extensions". The material the book does cover is still relavent, but will become even more dated with the release of the next version of J2EE. I look forward to the second edition of this book, which I hope would add JSP, XML, and JavaMail to the list of topics, and also cover newer versions of the J2EE APIs.
The information given in the book is sketchy in places, and it's in these places that Java Examples in a Nutshell comes in handy. These two books make an excellent pair. But if you're looking for a complete reference to J2EE, this isn't it (yet).
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on November 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
A great reference for the experienced programmer, definitely not a beginner's manual. The API listing takes up over half the book and can be easily found in online JavaDocs, but the actual book is great. I compared the chapter on JDBC to the Java Tutorial Continued - and it covered the same material (very clearly, too) in 1/3 as many pages.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Eric Dubuis on December 13, 2000
Format: Paperback
The book "Java Enterprise in a Nutshell" is a dense overview of some of the packages in J2EE. The book has three parts: An introduction, an enterprise reference and an API reference. The introduction describes each package, gives some examples and pointers for further readings. The second part contains reference material on SQL, RMI Tools, IDL and IDL tools and CORBA Services. The API reference lists the complete API of the packages covered by this book.
This text is very well written and does an exceptional job in describing the J2EE packages JDBC, RMI, JNDI as well Servelets, EJB and the Java IDL. The chapters are well structured and very clearly written. And they achieve their goal without filling hundreds of pages. Very good.
Unfortunately the book does not cover all of today's packages of J2EE but I guess that's the price to pay if the book has to be on the market early enough.
The book has some holes, but for the material it covers, it is one of the best, if not the best, books available.
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