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Java Servlet & JSP Cookbook Kindle Edition

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Length: 704 pages

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Bruce W. Perry played college soccer in New York, then amidst a varied career in journalism and software engineering finished literally (ask his knees!) hundreds of road races and multisport events. He's since moved on to family life and recreational alpine hiking, skiing, and resistance training. He has also written two recent software books for O'Reilly Media. After an unguided youth, he now hangs out weightlifting in gyms again, and climbs with guides now, recently Piz Palu in the Swiss Alps, Mt. Whitney's Mountaineer's Route, and Mt. Rainier.


Product Details

  • File Size: 3066 KB
  • Print Length: 748 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (January 21, 2004)
  • Publication Date: February 9, 2009
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0026OR3EE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,064,766 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Bruce W. Perry is a fiction and non-fiction writer. "Compulsion" is his fourth novel, the third in the Karl Standt series. Most of his time is spent with his wife and two kids in Warren, VT, USA.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 33 people found the following review helpful By W Boudville HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 10, 2004
Format: Paperback
The 'cookbook' in the title means that Perry emphasises what he considers to be many common tasks needed to be done by Java Servlets and JSPs, in a J2EE context. Similar in spirit to OReilly's other books like 'eBay Hacks' and 'google Hacks'. In fact, in the 26 chapters of Perry's book, there are on average over 5 tasks in each that he explains, which are akin to the hacks of the other books. Except here, he gives you over 130 hacks.
He assumes you know the basics of the subject. Certainly, the book does not claim to be a comprehensive listing of the subject's features. But if you satisfy this requirement, you can dive straight into any section of any chapter. Don't have to read this book linearly.
However, if you aren't using Tomcat or BEA WebLogic as containers, then the relevance of the book may, frankly, be more limited. Different containers have slightly different functionalities, and the examples he gives are very specific to those 2 containers. If you are in fact using another, perhaps you can use this book to provide design patterns and inspiration, but not actual code.
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85 of 94 people found the following review helpful By Matthew J. Weaver on September 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
Being an O'Reilly fan it is hard for me to find fault with their no-nonsense approach to technical books, but there is one MAJOR issue I have with this book.

As a developer for a major corporation I cannot use custom libraries for my work, especially when the license ([...]) does not allow for commercial use. Where it would be helpful to see details on creating say, a multipart request class, Bruce Perry instead uses the com.oreilly.servlet.MultipartRequest class to hide much of the functionality (this is just one example).

This makes little or no sense. Developers in the real world need real examples. Hiding the implementation of such under the non-commercial license pretty much ruins much of the potential application of an otherwise well written book. If you buy this book realise that only some of it will actually be useful in the real world.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Vinny Carpenter on March 4, 2004
Format: Paperback
In the great tradition of cookbooks, O'Reilly has published the Java Servlet and JSP Cookbook. This book, written by Bruce W. Perry is a must-own book for anyone working with web applications in the Java space. I've been a Java developer for almost 8 years now and have been working with Servlets since early 1999 and I've learned quite a few things from this book.
The Java Servlet & JSP Cookbook provides more than 200 'recipes' or fully working and documented code snippets that you can directly cut-and-paste in your application. The book starts off with a quick intro to writing servlets and JSP pages. I was very impressed that the first JSP page that you write uses JSTL and is not loaded up with scriptlet code. I am just sick and tired of arguing with people with scriptlets are bad and it's nice to see a book that starts off with JSTL. Kudos Bruce.
Once the intro is complete, you move onto writing deployment descriptors, deployment along with a nice little chapter on Ant. One of the most common question after people deploy JSP based application is the idea of precompiling JSPs for performance reasons. The fifth chapter does a great job of suggesting several methods of precompiling JSPs. I should also mention that the book includes how-to guides for Tomcat and WebLogic, which covers a pretty large landscape of web containers. WebSphere, Resin, Jetty are not directly covered.
The book then moves on and covers topics such as handling Form data via POST/GET, uploading files, cookies, session tracking and URL rewriting. There is also a chapter on JavaScript and how they use JavaScript with servlets. I don't really understand the point of this chapter as most users just need a few cut-n-paste JavaScript for client-side FORM validation.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Duff HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
Target Audience
Web developers who are looking for real-life examples of the use of servlets and JSP.
Contents
This is a companion-type book that goes beyond strictly reference material to the use of different servlet and JSP features, along with working examples of code to illustrate the concepts.
The book is divided multiple chapters that each cover a different technique or function:
Writing Servlets and JSPs; Deploying Servlets and JSPs; Naming Your Servlets; Using Apache Ant; Altering the Format of JSPs; Dynamically Including Content In Servlets and JSPs; Handling Web Form Data in Servlets and JSPs; Uploading Files; Handling Exceptions in Web Applications; Reading And Setting Cookies; Session Tracking; Integrating JavaScript with Servlets And JSPs; Sending Non-HTML Content; Logging Messages from Servlets and JSPs; Authenticating Clients; Binding, Accessing, and Removing Attributes in Web Applications; Embedding Multimedia in JSPs; Working With The Client Request; Filtering Request and Responses; Managing Email In Servlets and JSPs; Accessing Databases; Using Custom Tag Libraries; Using The JSTL; Internationalization; Using JNDI and Enterprise JavaBeans; Harvesting Web Information; Using the Google and Amazon Web APIs
Review
I really like the O'Reilly Cookbook series. I read a lot as part of my ongoing study, and often it's easy to understand conceptually what is going on. But making the jump to practical solutions can be difficult at times. The Cookbook series gets plenty of use on my bookshelf as I do my day to day coding. And when it comes to servlet and JSP coding as I continue to learn more about Websphere Application Server, this book will surely become dog-eared like the rest of them. Bruce Perry has done a great job.
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