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Java and XSLT (O'Reilly Java) Paperback – September, 2001

11 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 063-6920001430 ISBN-10: 0596001436 Edition: 1st

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Aimed at the Java developer who wants to learn XSLT quickly, Java and XSLT provides an in-depth guide to using XML to transform data in a variety of Web applications. With a no-nonsense presentation style and plenty of expert tips, this tutorial will let experienced developers master XSLT (and related standards) to create more flexible Web applications.

This text distinguishes itself with a fast-moving tutorial that covers XSLT from the ground up without getting bogged down in fast-changing XML standards, as is the case sometimes with other similar books. Combined with XML parsers (available in Sun's JAXP 1.1 APIs), Java is ready to go to solve real-world problems with XSLT. The author shows you how to apply XSLT to real problems, as well as integrating XSLT into your Web architecture. Early sections of the book show how XSLT can be used to separate presentation logic from business logic.

The first sections provide the basics of XSLT syntax, then the book moves on to more advanced searching and looping techniques. (Without traditional "state" or variables, XSLT requires a different way of thinking. This book does a good job of showing what's different in XSLT and techniques that can do more within real applications.)

This text's developer focus shows up early on, with a sample of XSLT used with Apache's Ant build utility. Later samples are more applicable to general Web development. A sample online discussion board built with servlets and XSLT style sheets shows off the fundamentals at work. With good coverage of Sun's JAXP 1.1 APIs for working with XML in Java, this book anchors its samples in real Java tools. A final section on wireless interfaces introduces the advantages of XSLT for transforming online content into WML for mobile devices.

Now that XSLT is a mainstream technology, more and more Java programmers will want to use it in real projects. Beyond syntax, this title shows you how to use XSLT to transform server-side data into client-side interfaces more flexibly. The practical focus of Java and XSLT is all you need to combine these two powerful technologies to create more maintainable Web applications that can reach both desktop and mobile browsers. --Richard Dragan

Topics covered: Introduction to XSLT; XML review; transforming data with XSLT; XPath; looping and sorting; conditional processing; formatting text and numbers; an XSLT example with the Ant build utility; review of Web architectures (including XSLT used with EJBs); compiling style sheets with JAXP 1.1; basic servlet tutorial (servlets used with XSLT); sample online discussion forum (with XSLT); advanced XSLT techniques (including session tracking without cookies, servlet filters, internationalization); tips for XSLT developers (developing, testing and debugging, performance tips); building wireless Web applications with WML and XSLT; JAXP 1.1 API reference; and XSLT quick reference.

About the Author

Eric M. Burke is a consultant, instructor, and author specializing in Java and XML-related technologies. He's a principal software engineer with Object Computing, Inc., based in St. Louis, Missouri.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 544 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (September 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596001436
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596001438
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,007,758 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Paul VINE VOICE on December 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
The combination of Servlets and XSLT is a natural fit and a possible alternative to Servlets and JSP.
This book gives excellent coverage to using XSLT to generate dynamic web pages. The first part of the book is an introduction to XSLT. For those unfamiliar with XSLT, this part of the book will be an excellent introduction. For those using XSLT, an additional tutorial or reference will be required. The next part of the book covers how to use a Java program to transform an XML document into HTML. SAX, DOM, JDOM, and JAXP are all covered. This section includes information on how to configure your environment to correctly process XML documents. Anyone who has run into the mysterious "sealing violation" will appreciate this help. The next part of the book is a series of case studies starting with a discussion forum. The case studies demonstrate solutions to real world programming issues and help to uncover some of the issues that programmers will face if they choose to use these technologies. Performance issues are discussed with each solution.
My one complaint with this book is that the author tends to overstate the advantages of XSLT while understating the advantages of JSP. Overall, the author has done an outstanding job of putting the two technologies (Java and XSLT) together in a way that is easy to understand.
Anyone interested in using XSLT in their Java development efforts should start with this book.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Shane Curcuru on November 2, 2001
Format: Paperback
Indeed, this is a great book to get started with XSLT in a Java world, and to see a few specific examples of how Java and XSLT efficiently combine to build real-world applications. I'd call it a cross between a tutorial and a general-purpose book on the subject. It does include some reference information on the most commonly used Java API's for XSLT processing and XML parsing. More useful than the references are the real-life examples that show Java programmers how to effectively code the various DOM, SAX, JAXP, JDOM, and other API's to actually use XSLT stylesheets.
This book is *not* a reference or tutorial for all of XSLT; if you really want to learn XSLT you need another book - perhaps Mike Kay's "XSLT" by Wrox press. This book (Java and XSLT) shows how to write basic XSLT stylesheets and how to integrate them into effective Java programs. It can help you to decide when integrating XSLT will be efficient (easier maintenance of XSLT code than Java code; easier for some content management tasks and staffers) and when you might consider another methodology.
If you don't know what you need to know about XSLT and stylesheets, this is an excellent place to start! (And I'm not just saying that because my name is in the book 8-)
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28 of 34 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 31, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Focused too heavily on dynamically created XML being transformed to HTML.
I am interested in the power of XSL for transforming business data between disparate systems. Simple code examples from the web site often didn't work. No complex examples in the book.
I was very disappointed to find that the "XSLT Quick Reference" in Appendix C consists of syntax requirements straight from the W3C spec and single line references for where to look in the W3C spec for a "Quick Reference".
Example:
For <xsl:apply-imports>
The "Quick Reference" provides the following ...
<xsl:apply-imports>
See XSLT specification section 5.6: "Overriding Template Rules."
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 10, 2001
Format: Paperback
A year ago when I was struggling with XSL stylesheets and servlets this book would have been a god send. Unfortunately, I stumbled and learned much of what's in this book through reading countless sources and documentation. Some of the outstanding features of this book are its thorough yet concise coverage of XSL syntax. The first three chapters could easily replace most thick XSL books on the market today. It also goes into quite a bit of detail into the use of JAXP, which I've found very useful in a couple of projects. Also, there are some extremely useful techniques for using XSL with Servlets (such as Stylesheet caching). All in all a very worthwhile read.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Carl on February 18, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is not what I hope for. Although it has been out for a couple of years the author has not even aknowledged some of the major typos in the book (see O'Reilly web site).
Although nicely written in a style that can be fairly easily followed, it is missing a substantial amount of needed reference material. For example in the section on conditional statements it refers to boolean expressions. Nowhere does he provide a list of operators or build-in functions available. You either have to build your own incomplete list gleaned from his examples or go find a good reference book.
O'Reilly authors generally do a better job.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jack D. Herrington on March 6, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is definitely showing it's age. It covers XSLT as it was in 2001. It's all about having a flexible front-end and serving XML out as HTML and WML, or using it for internationalization. It's coverage of code generation is very, very minimal. There is also very little in the way of advice about increasing processing efficiency. There are also small mistakes; for example the misstatements about CGI and Servlets, which is a common error in Java articles and books.
That being said, the examples are well annotated and the XML is highlighted for readability. The code is loosely annotated, which is the O'Reilly style, but it still makes some of the larger code fragments had to follow.
As long as you know that this book is a little dated you will find reasonable material in here about XML, XSLT and how to get it into Java. It could use a second edition with more topical material.
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