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JavaServer Faces 2.0, The Complete Reference 1st Edition

3.1 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0071625098
ISBN-10: 0071625097
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ed Burns is a senior staff engineer at Sun Microsystems and is the co-specification lead for Java Server Faces. He is the co-author of JavaServer Faces: The Complete Reference and the author of Secrets of the Rock Star Programmers.

Neil Griffin is committer and JSF Team Lead for Liferay Portal and the co-founder of The PortletFaces Project.
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Product Details

  • Series: The Complete Reference
  • Paperback: 752 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education; 1 edition (January 18, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071625097
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071625098
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 1.4 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,242,198 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having reached past page 100 of the book, I feel compelled to pause for a moment and offer my review of it. If my opinion changes somewhat later, I'll update it in consequence.

Obviously, this book was hastily published, in an attempt to be the first one out, and is sorely lacking proofreading and coordination between the authors. Following are a few issues I personally found grating.

The text is adequate but verbose (some topics are needlessly broached several times) and all over the place (topics are started in a chapter, continued in another, and neither chapter provides a comprehensive picture of the functionality they're dealing with). Depth is inconsistent: Chapter 3, which is entirely devoted to explaining the request processing lifecycle, glosses over how navigating between different pages interacts with the lifecyle of those pages but at the same time Chapter 2 feels necessary to explain that you should use 'localhost' in your browser to point to a locally deployed application.

Some sections are directly lifted from the previous edition: I suppose there are no differences between the Expression Language in version 1.2 and version 2.0, but I'd like at least an acknowledgment instead of a diagram that only shows JSF versions reaching 1.2. Another example is that, suddenly, the text makes reference to JSP as the view definition language, and you find yourself wondering whether that section you're reading is still relevant in a Facelets world.

Even better (well, worse) is to see an "Expert Group Insight" box praising the MethodBinding class, without even making a note that the class is now deprecated (as a matter of fact, MethodBinding was *already* deprecated in JSF 1.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was attracted by the statements on the cover of this book.
But the content I found is equal to online Java EE tutorial + JSF 2.0 specification.

There are a lot of new features in JSF 2.0 and the authors introduce them well, but often without context. I mean I want to see a real problem that is easily and nicely can be solved by using the feature, what I see instead is just a synthetic "hello world" examples. This is one of the reasons why new comers programmers write inconsistent code: they use wrong tools in a wrong places.

There are not so many real examples as the book claims it has. There are no custom components created and just composite ones. I mean there are no Calendar component, fancy button component, accordions, etc. Without those components it is hard to call a site "RIA".
And as I understand JSF 2.0 is for Rich Internet Applications.
The "Virtual Trainer Application" sample (which is the only one complete and real) does not show the Full power of JSF 2.0. I mean I can implement the same application by using JSP 2.1 or with Struts 2.0, or with SpringMVC -- any MVC capable framework can do the same job with almost the same effort. So why should I use JSF? Ok, there is Validation which is greatly highlighted, but I wanted to see more.

Authors constantly says that we should not use that technique or this code in the real world example. Look, why I then bought this book?
For simplicity authors remove some JEE aspects, like EJB, but what they do instead is create their own things which kind of replace for EJB. They shows the real code and asks not to use it. What is the reason then? I am sure junior programmers won't check EJB and just will use the code authors provide.
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I am fortunate to have prior experience using JSF but I assume this book is going to be very hard to follow for developers new to this topic. And it is very verbose and still lacking for developers that have already used older versions of JSF. The chapter on Facelets is a joke. I haven't completed the book yet though. So far it has been a disappointment. It is a very incomplete reference.
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This is one of the worse JSF 2 books by so called JSF experts.

The book has done very little to promote new JSF 2 features and good JSF 2 practice. One of the most important new features in JSF 2 is Ajax support, which really shines comparing to ASP.NET 3.5/4.0's complicated yet not very useful Ajax support. But it is only given very simplistic treatment in the book.

The other big disappointment is the example code in the book. All the examples in this book are very trivial except the Virtual Trainer application in chapter ten which is of a significant size for a book. But the quality of this Virtual Trainer application is poor. e.g. Flash scope is used in a very confusing way and unnecessarily (hint: use view scope), while dangerous coding practice is adopted such as making entity manager calls from entity's setter methods.

It seems written by people who cant even write a small JSF application properly. An author like Matthew MacDonald (author of Pro ASP.NET) is needed to make JSF 2 more popular.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I purchased this book in the hopes of gaining a much more thorough understanding of the JSF 2.0 framework. Right from the beginning, there were lots of typos and misinformation; for example, the author states Tomcat 5 is a Servlet 2.5 container that is capable of running JSF 2.0. This is, in point of fact, NOT true. Tomcat 6 is capable of running JSF 2.0, with some modifications to some of the common libraries. Tomcat 5, however, is NOT now nor will it ever be capable of running JSF 2.0. Additionally, certain instructions (such as setting up your development environment or Maven 2 environment) are only available on the jsfcompref.com web site. In order to access this information, you have to answer a series of simple questions about specific words at specific locations within the book. I have yet to be able to access this information. After multiple submissions to the web site asking for help, I have not heard back from anyone. In this manner, the book in incomplete! The source code can be downloaded from the McGraw-Hill web site, but that's all.

Overall, this book has provided little additional information aside what a good Google search will provide. I do NOT recommend this book for anyone that is interested in learning JSF 2.0.
JavaServer Faces 2.0, The Complete Reference
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