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At the Jazz Corner of the World


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7 new from $91.72 12 used from $24.97
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Audio CD, April 19, 1994
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$91.72 $24.97

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song Title Time Price
listen  1. Hipsippy Blues (Live) 9:26$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Justice (Live) 7:37$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  3. The Theme (Live) 2:18$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Close Your Eyes (Live)10:58$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Just Coolin' (Live) 8:11$1.29  Buy MP3 


Disc 2:

Samples
Song Title Time Price
listen  1. Chicken An' Dumplings (Live) 7:26$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  2. M & M (Live) 6:41$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Hi-Fly (Live) 8:00$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  4. The Theme (Live) 9:13$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Art's Revelation (Live) 8:13$1.29  Buy MP3 

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 19, 1994)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Blue Note Records
  • ASIN: B000005GXA
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #344,801 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

This extremely short-lived lineup of Messengers recorded only once together--in April 1959 at New York's Birdland. This engaging and accessible two-CD collection documents this incarnation, which finds tenor Hank Mobley (one of the earliest Messengers) returning to the fold as a stopgap between recently departed Benny Golson and soon-to-join Wayne Shorter. The remainder of the quintet--Lee Morgan, pianist Bobby Timmons, and bassist Jymie Merritt--are all holdovers from the classic Moanin' lineup, which remains Blakey's funkiest. Mobley adds three compositions to a repertoire that includes Thelonious Monk's tricky "Justice," Ray Bryant's irresistibly groovy "Chicken an' Dumplins," and Randy Weston's easy-swaying "Hi-Fly." Morgan and Mobley are in typically fine form throughout this in-the-pocket set. --Marc Greilsamer

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Brandon De Cordova on December 3, 1999
Format: Audio CD
WARNING! THIS CD HAS ENOUGH RAW ENERGY TO INCREASE THE EARTHS ORBIT AND LIGHTEN THE FORCE OF GRAVITY IN A 30 FT. RADIUS OF YOUR STEREO.! well that might be a bit of hyperbole, but there are enough sparks generated here to power a small nuclear reactor. from beginning to end this album soars with intense solos from all, especially Morgan, who is barely 21 years old, but probably playing at the peak of the first stage of his career. Enough can't be said about the intensity of this album, which was recorded remarkably well for a live performance of that time (4/15/59). Highlights include a nine minute rendition of "The Theme" played at a more relaxed tempo. A lesser known Monk title, "Justice", which contains one of my favorite Lee Morgan solos of all time. An early version of Bobby Timmons' "Hi-Fly" and "Just Coolin'" a jazz waltz written by Mobley, one of his best early compositions in my lay-oppinion. If you're new to jazz, or the music of Art Blakey, this is great place to start your interest. Very accessable, hard-swinging music by the greatest hard-bop jazz group in history. Loud, fiery music!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Andre Novaes de Rezende on August 3, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Well, you might. This Cd is the best Jazz Messengers album I have ever heard since "A Night at Birdland vol.1&2" with Clifford, and the killer albuns "Moanin'" and "Paris 1958" with Lee Morgan. About the "solo" thing, (and about Clifford and Lee Morgan) this Cd has one of the best solos by Lee Morgan I have ever heard. I agree with the previous review: the solo on "Justice" is AWESOME!!! If you heard some tunes from the "Paris 1958" album (which is a Live album) you should know that Lee just explodes on live performances. This album "At The Jazz Corner vol 1&2" is also live and it includes TWO sessions of "smoking" Lee Morgan. By the way, you should also try the tune "Kiss and Run" on the Sonny Rollins "plus 4" album. Then you will hear one of the most inspired solos by Clifford Brown. If you are a Jazz Messenger FAN, GO FOR IT!!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Caponsacchi HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 22, 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is the same group as the one on Art's best-selling "Moanin'" album with the exception of Hank Mobley, who replaces Benny Golson on tenor saxophone. It's Mobley's presence that makes all of the difference, so much so that I would rank this session with another two-fer recording at the same location, "Art Blakey at Birdland," which tries to complement the undeniable genius of Clifford Brown with the pedestrian playing of Lou Donaldson.

Previous reviewers have pointed out the brilliance of Lee Morgan's solo on "Justice" (Monk's "Evidence," renamed by Blakey for reasons that elude me), but listen to the strong follow-up on the same tune by Mobley. The drive, the ideas, the quote ("Sonny Boy"), and the passion all contribute to a stirring solo that simply picks up where Morgan left off. (The same Monk tune is featured, but with its more popular title, "Evidence," on a Bluebird CD of a slightly earlier session with Golson--"Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers: Paris, 1958." Morgan's solo, though completely different on this occasion, is equally inventive.)

As usual Mobley is a story-teller of the first order, making every phrase count (a striking contrast to the garrulous pyrotechnics of a Golson solo). The ensemble spirit, the announcements of Blakey and Pee Wee Marquette, the interaction among the musicians and crowd--this was another unrepeatable musical event that you won't want to be without. If there's a caveat, it's my personal aversion to some of the mixing choices made by recording engineer Rudy Van Gelder. He brings each player front and center but at the expense of ensemble "depth" and occasionally of individual tonal expressiveness.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Eddie Landsberg VINE VOICE on May 21, 2010
Format: MP3 Music
This is Blakey hot, live and cooking... and with Lee Morgan and Hank Mobley right up front...
I think its particularly interesting because in my opinion, of all the great frontmen Blakey assembled, this was my favorite line-up... in many ways were of the same school (hard bop), yet on the other hand were very different... Morgan, for example had a bit of Dizzy Gillespie old school bop in him... Mobley bopped and swung, but also took advantage in a different way... as a horn section they're really tight and powerful, and blacked by Blakey's unique "time keeping" + backbeat style drumming adapted to the context of modern Jazz, they're cooking. Jymie Merritt's bass playing is up on - - Bobby Timmons is... well, Bobby Timmons - - bluesy, Monkish at times, but a very fluent cooker and born with a left hand comp that really gave the Blakey sound the Blakey sound (what more can I say...?) -- last but definitely not least, Blakey's having a good time, though I don't quite get the high hat thing on "Justice" - -but heck...all the other tunes make up for it... and also its a live recording... bands take time to warm up... CLOSE YOUR EYES is the point in the performance where the band is really full gear and the band is tightest and most together... in the groove yet stretched out... of course, emcee PeeWee Marquette is also an important part of the show and demonstrates that there was once a time when Jazz was music to move to and get people excited, not BGM for checking your blackberry and texting.
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