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Jazz Spectacular Original recording remastered


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Audio CD, Original recording remastered, June 15, 1999
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$56.67 $12.31

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 15, 1999)
  • Original Release Date: 1955
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Columbia Records/Sony
  • ASIN: B00000JBDP
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #484,272 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. S'posin'
2. Stars Fell On Alabama
3. Until The Real Thing Comes Along
4. My Old Flame
5. You Can Depend On Me
6. That Old Feeling
7. Taking A Chance On Love
8. If You Were Mine
9. Baby, Baby All The Time
10. Roses Of Picardy
11. You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Though he shared the same urban musical background as other band singers of his generation (he was a mentor to Anita O'Day), Frankie Laine enjoyed a unique success in the 1950s with highly dramatic (and heavily orchestrated) "cowboy" songs, including film and TV themes like "High Noon" and "Rawhide." He may have been closer to his real roots and affinities on this 1956 venture into jazz, with a comfortable collection of more-conventional pop tunes and an all-star band led by the superb trumpeter and Count Basie veteran Buck Clayton. Whatever his enthusiasm for the project, though, Laine isn't a jazz singer in any usual sense of the term, rather a good pop singer with an ability to emphasize lyrics in a distinctive, almost conversational way that creates an immediate bond with his audience. That relaxed yet precise diction makes the opening "S'posin'" particularly successful, but elsewhere his vocals serve essentially as pleasant frames for some excellent solos by Clayton, tenor saxophonist Budd Johnson, and special guest trombonist J.J. Johnson. --Stuart Broomer

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 10, 2001
Format: Audio CD
I do not mean to be disresptful of the opinions of others, but I must take exception to a statement a previous reviewer wrote: that Frankie Laine sounds like a country hick trying to sing jazz. Frankie Laine was very singular in his style yes, but a great jazz singer anyway. Laine started off his career making only jazz records. He even wrote a couple of jazz standards. Later he started to record some pop, and even later at the insistence of Mitch Miller he started recording the cowboy songs he is most famous for. Regardless, this records kicks. The arrangements are all top notch, the soloists shine, and Laine's singing is impressive. Don't miss out on this one Buck Clayton fans!
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By T. Maddison on June 13, 2000
Format: Audio CD
I was new to this album, despite having a keen interest in Clayton's work of this period. What a delight! Frankie Laine's voice is an unusual one compared to most big band or jazz singers of the time - very full-on, very showbiz, not particularly interpretive of the lyrics, but very swinging and fluid - it grows. The music is absolutely top class, with a medium size band of top players (Jo Jones, Sir Charles Thompson, J.J. Johnson, Budd Johnson, Milt Hinton and more) headed by Buck Clayton, who wrote the sharp arrangements. How great it would've been to have heard this in a night club at the time!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Bill Fuller on May 10, 2000
Format: Audio CD
This is one of the best Frankie Laine c.d.'s that I have purchased.It would have been so wonderful to have seen this performed in person. The band is fantastic and Frankie does what he does best in every song on this c.d. Buck Clayton, J.J. Johnson and Budd Johnson are spectacular especially when they do their own solos. I would very highly recomend this c.d. to anyone and if you don't think you are a Frankie Laine fan try this one on for size. I know you will love it.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By C. V. Garnett on January 26, 2000
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The one word that would best summarize this session is "tight." The musicians "cook," as we say, or used to. Frankie Laine is in fine form. The concept of the album in the old Columbia 30th Street Studio was his and at the time he had the influence to make it happen. Buck Clayton leads a combo of fine jazz musicians in a collection of standards. "You Can Depend on Me," "That Old Feeling," and the other songs have never had fairer treatment. J.J. and Kai drop in and join the group on a couple of the songs. It's an album --a CD--to listen to and shake your head at: can it get any better than this? You won't go wrong on this one, and when you listen to it and love it, don't feel you have to thank me. Just enjoy.
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Format: Audio CD
Frankie Laine may not have been a Sinatra, Tony Bennett, or even Dick Haymes, but he was a likeable performer who not only introduced the haunting "We'll Be Together Again" but gave 100% every time out, whether classic American Songbook material or ephemeral period pieces like "Cry of the Wild Goose" and "I Believe." But there's no better way to honor his memory than to re-issue this album, shamefully out of print weeks after his passing.

Even if you're not a Laine fan, he fits in perfectly in the mix of this hi-spirited swing session. Buck Clayton has a distinctive voice on the trumpet practically matching that of Pops, but above all the recording is a gathering of Titanic trombonists, all of whom play their tails off. To begin with, there's the inimitable Dickie Wells, whose only equal among Basie trombonists may have been Al Grey. Then there's Kai Winding and the most influential of them all, J. J. Johnson, both given generous ensemble and solo space. But if that's not enough, add Duke Elllngton's #1 trombonist, Lawrence Brown. Normally, the most genteel and lyrical of trombone voices, Lawrence blows up a storm here. In fact, on the finale, a red-hot "Roses of Picardy," he follows both J.J. and Kai with a solo that scoops everyone, setting up Laine's joyous "out" chorus.

Whether you regard Frankie as the featured singer or just another player, as the star or the catalyst, this is a session that he has a right to be proud of--one, moreover, that deserves a place in most listeners' collections.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael Pendragon on May 2, 2003
Format: Audio CD
The other one being THE STORY OF OLD MAN JAZZ & HIS LOVES (SCORE, 2002), and also featuring the singing of Frankie Laine.
Guess it's clear who my all-time favorite jazz singer is.

*****
JAZZ SPECTACULAR is precisely that: spectacular. Buck Clayton's trumpet is the perfect match for Frankie Laine's trumpet-like voice (often compared to a trumpet, Laine patterned his approach to jazz largely on his idol, Louis Armstrong's horn playing). The individual tracks glide so seamlessly in and out of vocals and instrumentals that the two aspects seem to have melded into one. This is jazz at its finest.
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