Qty:1
  • List Price: $37.00
  • Save: $3.70 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Jean Rhys: Wide Sargasso ... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: :
Comment: Crisp, clean, unread paperback with light shelfwear to the covers and a publisher's mark to one edge - Nice!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Jean Rhys: Wide Sargasso Sea; A Reader's Guide to Essential Criticism Paperback – September 6, 2002


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$33.30
$12.18 $1.95

"Ruby" by Cynthia Bond: An Oprah's Book Club 2.0 Selection
"Ruby" by Cynthia Bond: An Oprah's Book Club 2.0 Selection
The epic, unforgettable story of a man determined to protect the woman he loves from the town desperate to destroy her. See more Oprah's Book Club Picks
$33.30 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Jean Rhys: Wide Sargasso Sea; A Reader's Guide to Essential Criticism + The Complete Persepolis
Price for both: $50.26

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 194 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (September 6, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184046268X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1840462685
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.4 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,774,467 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'I continue to find the Readers' Guides indispensable for teaching - they really give the students a sense of criticism having a history' - Professor Rachel Bowlby, University of York 'The series looks really excellent - attractively produced, user friendly; and outstanding value for money' - Ronald Knowles, Reader, University of Reading

About the Author

Carl Plasa is Lecturer in English, Centre for Critical and Cultural Theory, University of Wales, Cardiff.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Luan Gaines HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 6, 2006
Format: Paperback
Haunting and resonant, Wide Sargasso Sea evokes and era and place, mid-nineteenth century, with an almost hallucinatory beauty, a remote Caribbean island near Jamaica, a lonely young woman abandoned to her unwilling caretakers, forever searching for a safety that does not exist. The once powerful Creole family has fallen into desperate times, the profligate patriarch dead from his own excesses, his beautiful second wife, Annette, left to suffer in isolation with her two children, the small son impaired developmentally, and the daughter, Antoinette Cosway, emotionally damaged by a distant mother.

A recently emancipated slave society is no longer willing to suffer the conceits of their former masters. As the islanders become more hostile, the newly remarried Annette Cosway berates her groom for his inadequacies in protecting them, losing contact with reality after losing her frail son, the victim of an incident with the former slaves. Antoinette Cosway grows into womanhood a beauty like her mother, but an inherited fortune renders her a pawn of fate. Given by her guardian in marriage to the penniless Mr. Rochester (of Jane Eyre fame), Antoinette finds no solace in the arms of a man who does not love her, indeed, hardly knows her. For a time, the transports of physical passion are sufficient distraction, but, like island life, even pleasure is exhausting, burning out in its own brilliance. Convinced her husband no longer loves her, Antoinette seeks aid from her former nanny, Christophine, an obeah woman who attended her mother in days past.

Decay is pervasive on an island where the sun shines too intensely, Antoinette retreating to the fevered images of her imagination in lieu of the happiness she was promised.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Joshua G. Feldman on September 14, 2007
Format: Paperback
Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea is a dreamlike feverish novel awash in passion and trauma. Forget for a moment that it's a sequel to "Jane Eyre" or that it is a seminal text in Feminism and Colonialist studies. Simply as a strikingly modern story of trauma and madness it is brilliant. Disorienting, agonizing, nightmarish yet stunningly beautiful; I was forced to read it in dribs and drabs - as the knife edge of Rhys' vision would compel me to come up, panting for air. This book is powerful - yet unforgivingly dark. But, of course, it is much more - it's a modernist masterpiece which brilliantly critiques the human costs of crimes of patriarchy, colonialism, slavery and subjugation. It is a searing indictment at the same time it is a haunting work of art.

Antoinette grows up poor and isolated at her family's plantation. Her companions are the black laborers and their children who simmer with resentment at the legacy of slavery. Slavery may have been abolished but has been replaced with economic and social subjugation and the resentment is palpable. Mr. Mason disregards this in a classic example of colonialist arrogance - which destroys their lives. Her mother's anger at Mr. Mason leads to her imprisonment as a mad woman. Women are not permitted to express rage. Patriarchy is central because Antoinette/Bertha is chattel. Her marriage to Rochester is effected because she owns land - it's an economic arrangement to gain property for Rochester. Once married, Antoinette/Bertha is stripped of all her claim to property and is completely under her husband's authority. Their marriage is marked by passion but it becomes apparent how culturally Caribbean (black) she is, tainted with scandal. Their relationship flames out spectacularly.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 18, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Everyone else who reviewed this book concentrated on praising or disparaging "Wide Sargasso Sea" and not on this excellent sampler of serious literary criticism of "Wide Sargasso Sea." Editor Carl Plasa begins with three reviews from the novel's publication in 1966. He gives samples from the major schools of criticism that have passed in waves across Anglophone academia from the 1960s through the 1990s. If you want a good overview of why "Wide Sargasso Sea" is the only "Jane Eyre" knockoff regarded as real literature, this is a good place to start. Furthermore, when it was published in 2001, Carl Plasa was writing a book about Charlotte Brontë.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By HORAK on November 18, 2007
Format: Paperback
In "Wide Sargasso Sea", Jean Rhys offers the reader another side to "Jane Eyre". The story of Bertha, the first Mrs Rochester, "Wide Sargasso Sea" is a damning history of colonialism in the Caribbean.
The story is set just after the emancipation of the slaves, in that difficult time when racial relations in the Caribbean were at their most tense. Antoinette is descended from plantation owners. She can be accepted neither by the black community nor by the representatives of the colonial centre. As a white Creole she is nothing. The taint of racial impurity, coupled with the suspicion that she is mentally imbalanced bring about her downfall.
Rhys divides the speaking voice between Rochester, who is never named in the novel and Antoinette. Rochester is portrayed a proud younger brother betrayed by his family into a loveless marriage. His double standards are exposed when he chooses to sleep with the maid, Amélie, so displaying the promiscuous behaviour and attraction to the black community which he accuses Antoinette of harbouring. Their happiness at Granbois is ended by his willingness to believe the worst of Antoinette.
The lack of understanding between two cultures is at the root of Antoinette's subsequent madness. Madness for Antoinette mostly derives from the uneasy feeling of being unable to tell the difference between dream and reality, when reality eventually becomes dream-like.
The book is read by Anna Bentinck for ISIS Publishing. An impressive performance given the wide range of accents used by the reader.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Jean Rhys: Wide Sargasso Sea; A Reader's Guide to Essential Criticism
This item: Jean Rhys: Wide Sargasso Sea; A Reader's Guide to Essential Criticism
Price: $37.00 $33.30
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com