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Jeeves in the Morning Paperback – February 5, 1990


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Jeeves in the Morning + A Tale of Two Cities (Dover Thrift Editions)
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Product Details

  • Series: Perennial Library (Book 658)
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: HarpPeren; Reprint edition (February 5, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060972823
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060972820
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,205,944 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From AudioFile

Here are the zany misadventures of foggy-minded aristocrat Bertie Wooster and his sharp-witted valet, Jeeves. They visit Steeple Bumpleigh, home of Bertie's Uncle Percy, also the home of Bertie's ex-fiancée, Florence, and her new fiancé, Constable Stilton Cheesewright. In addition, Bertie's cousin, Nobby, wants Bertie's help in gaining Uncle Percy's approval of her writer fiancé. To complicate the romantic antics, Stilton thinks Bertie wants to reconcile with Florence (as does Florence) and threatens bodily harm. Into the muddle comes Jeeves, who, as always, saves the day. It's hard to improve on this treasure, but Jonathan Cecil does it with an impeccable, wildly funny narration. M.T.B. © AudioFile 2005, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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A great Wodehouse story and wonderful word play by the master.
Christine Richardson
Jeeves and Bertie Wooster are back in this ripping novel by P.G. Wodehouse, one of the best of the Wooster-Jeeves series.
Russel E. Higgins
I have read this book perhaps a dozen times, and I still laugh aloud at least once on nearly every page.
Mostly Mozart

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Russel E. Higgins on April 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
Jeeves and Bertie Wooster are back in this ripping novel by P.G. Wodehouse, one of the best of the Wooster-Jeeves series. The novel takes place at Steeple Bumpleigh, a place which Bertie takes care to avoid, for the Hampshire estate invaribly brings unmitigated disaster to his life. The country house visit is peopled with such Wodehousian favorites as Lord Worpleston, Nobby Hopwood, Stilton Cheesewright, Edwin the Boy Scout, and Boko Fittleworth. The plot is, of course, pure Wodehouse, a combination of convulution and well-ordered chaos which contains no aspects of reality; it is Wodehouse's "musical comedy" world, a gentle upper-class romp over the British countryside, with fancy dress balls, English estates with its varied eccentric guests, and a mish-mash of dramatic irony. Wodehouse is pure satirical farce of the first order, told from the perspecitve of one of the most loveable, yet incompetent twits in English literature, Bertie Wooster, whose mix of understatement and hyperbole, linguistic abbreviations, weird similes and metaphors, and misplaced and misquoted literary allusions endear him to Anglophiles throughout the world. As one critic puts it, Wodehouse presents "a ray of pale English sunshine into a gray world," a quotation with which no lover of Wodehouse would ever argue. "Jeeves in the Morning" is a delight and required reading for any lover of well-written British prose.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By bruce horner on August 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is the culmination of the art of Wodehouse, the Mozart of formula fiction. One of the two best Jeeves novels, it really should be read after Code of the Woosters, though it can also stand alone. Nobody had Wodehouse's way with the english language, and what other farce-humor writer could equal the gleaming precision and intricacy of his plots? This novel was polished to perfection because he used the time he spent in internment during World War II to work on it, thus giving it more time than probably any of his other books. In England it was called Joy In the Morning, but by any name they don't come much funnier.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 13, 1998
Format: Paperback
This was my first foray into the delightful world of Bertam W. Wooster and his manservant, Jeeves. I remember a specific moment in time when I realized that I held a priceless treasure in my hands. I sometimes wish that I were ignorant of the works of Wodehouse so that I might relive that magical moment- this book is that good.
It is a pleasure to revisit every now and then, to appreciate what a masterful job Wodehouse has done in constructing his characters, their relationships, and sticky situations which seem to befoul our featherbrained protagonist.
If you have not yet experienced Wodehouse and you have an appreciation of wit, I would be surprised if you do not have the same kind of epiphany I did before the conclusion of the second chapter. Enjoy!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Gord Wilson VINE VOICE on August 4, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Reading some reviews I wonder if these readers read the same book I did. Wodehouse would seem the last author to psychoanalyze, and his books would seem the last to over-analyze, being almost the only antidote left to the over-everything of the modern (or is it post-modern world?). By the way, there is no "capital punishment" in this book, which refers to the death penalty. There is "corporal punishment" common in the Britain of Wodehouse's day and referred to often in his books as "six of the juciest" and by other sobriquets.

Anyone who's read a lot of PGW has already read this one, one of the topping best. But if you've perused one another Jeeves book, you may still think you've read this one due to the Wooster habit of referring to and reminiscing about his previous adventures.

Also, fans of the excellent Jeeves and Wooster (or is it Wooster and Jeeves?) TV series will find all sorts of bits from this book, some of them surviving intact. While I very much like the Penguin new reissue paperbacks, this edition and a few other American paperbacks feature art by Steven Guarnaccia. They are slightly larger than the pocket paperbacks, fall open nicely in the hand, and have slightly tan pages which minimize the glare when reading outside.

I think the reviewer is correct who said this is the same book as Joy in the Morning, itself a clever play on the Psalmist's "Joy cometh in the morning". The alternate editions are listed in two books (neither of which I have handy right now), Joseph Connolly's P.G. Wodehouse (Thames and Hudson Literary Lives), out of print and rather difficult to get but well worth it; and Richard Usborne's Plum Sauce (I may have misspelled both author's names). These books have helped me avoid ordering the same book under different titles, and also enable those so desiring to read PGW's output in chronological order.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By M. Allen Greenbaum HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on June 4, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
P.G. Wodehouse's "Jeeves" books are noted for their similarity of plot but suavity of execution. Of the latter, a "Times Literary Supplement (London)" critic writes: "...there comes a stage where the [inveterate] reader . . . finds a new pleasure in seeing how exquisitely it is done." The words "facile" and "frothy" describe Wodehouse's delectable concoctions, in which aristocratic Bertram "Bertie" Wooster finds himself inevitably drawn to the rescue of young lovers, a task to which he is eminently ill-suited. (Bertie, in wave after wave of well-intentioned malapropisms, undeserved self-esteem, unintentional ironies, misquoted allusions, and suspicion-raising bungling, would be the epitome of the foolish nouveaux riches, if only his own riche were nouveau.) Instead, Bertie, appeals to the old "feudal spirit" of his cunning and erudite butler Jeeves, Bertie's superior in everything but station. It is Jeeves who really comes to the rescue, bailing Wooster `out of the soup.'
The stars of this show (as others have noted, Wodehouse wrote these adventures in a theatrical, musical-comedy style) are two pairs of "affianced" lovers; the fetching Zenobia "Nobby" Hopwood and writer Boko Fittleworth, and the intimidating couple of Florence Craye and G. D'Arcy "Stilton" Cheesewright; as well as Lord Percy Worplesdon: Florence's father, Nobby's ward, Bertie's uncle, and young Edwin's father--more on him later--and, finally, American shipping magnate, J. Chichester Clam.
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