Buy New
$33.13
Qty:1
  • List Price: $42.50
  • Save: $9.37 (22%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $9.78
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Jefferson Vindicated - Fallacies, Omissions, and Contradictions in the Hemings Genealogical Search Paperback – July 1, 2005


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$33.13
$33.13 $21.98

Frequently Bought Together

Jefferson Vindicated - Fallacies, Omissions, and Contradictions in the Hemings Genealogical Search + The Jefferson-Hemings Controversy: Report of the Scholars Commission
Price for both: $75.88

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on the current pick, "The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee" by Marja Mills.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 225 pages
  • Publisher: Cynthia H. Burton; Third Printing edition (July 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0976777509
  • ISBN-13: 978-0976777502
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 8.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,514,702 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"What a thorough assessment of the fascinating historical question of whether Thomas Jefferson fathered a child by a slave. This book considers Sally Hemings' fertility cycle, Jefferson's travels; apparently, every 'conceivable' angle is covered. Who says that self-published books can't be as scholarly as university press tomes?" --George Brosi, Editor, Appalachian Heritage

"Burton provides credibility and persuasion for her 'vindication' of Jefferson through detailed research and reasoning...[she] has done an admirable job of bringing balance to the discussion." --Dave Caddell, Reviewer, Rutherford Institute, Oldspeak

About the Author

Cynthia Burton has a rich family history in early Albemarle County, Virginia and has been studying the historic neighborhood and its inhabitants for 35 years. She is a professional researcher, veteran genealogist, and she is an authority on Jefferson's private life, his brother Randolph Jefferson, and the enslaved community at Monticello. James A. Bear, Jr., Emeritus Director and Curator of the Thomas Jefferson (Memorial) Foundation contributed the foreword for this effort. His 30-year tenure at Monticello produced significant research and numerous publications; but he is best known for his work as editor of Jefferson at Monticello and as co-editor of both Jefferson's Memorandum Books and The Family Letters of Thomas Jefferson.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By R. Turner on May 27, 2009
Format: Paperback
When the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation issued a report in January 2000 concluding that Thomas Jefferson probably fathered all of Sally Hemings' children, I was shocked (because it seemed so out of character with what I had learned during decades of studying Jefferson) but assumed the issue was settled. After all, Sally's son Eston had been matched by DNA to a Jefferson father, and as a man of science Jefferson would want us to follow truth wherever it led us. Three months later, I was invited to join with a group of more than a dozen Jefferson scholars from around the country -- most of whom either had "distinguished" or "eminent" in their academic title, had held chaired professorships, or had at least chaired their department or its graduate studies program. Most have had books on sale at the Monticello gift shop. We all served as volunteers and without compensation.

After a year-long inquiry in which we examined every argument we could find, to my great surprise we concluded with but a single very mild dissent that the story of a sexual relationship between Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings was probably false. We found that paternity advocates had altered key historical documents (changing as many as 13 words in a single sentence to totally reverse the original meaning), and that many of the arguments were based upon false "facts" and others that when placed in context disclosed no "special privileges" for Sally or her children (when compared to the treatment received by other descendants of Sally's mother, Betty Hemings). A very brief summary of some of our conclusions can be found here: [...] .
Read more ›
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Herbert Barger on February 13, 2006
Format: Paperback
The author, Cyndi Burton, was most fortunate in securing a forward by one of the most knowledgeable Jefferson historians alive today, Mr. James Adams Bear, Jr. Emeritus Director of Monticello. On his watch many revealing Jefferson books were published, among them the little known book, Thomas Jefferson and His Unknown Brother,(brother Randolph invited to Monticello exactly 9 months prior to Eston Hemings's birth), The Hemings Family at Monticello, the Jefferson Memorandum Books, the Family Letters of Thomas Jefferson, and others. And as author Burton says, "no curatorial research at Monticello has matched Bear's in magnitude." To write the forward for Cyndi Burton's "EXPOSE" is most corageous in a climate of political correctness and historical revisionism surrounding the Jefferson-Hemings DNA "fiasco." I know this because as a Jefferson family historian and assistant to Dr. E.A. Foster with the now infamous DNA Study, you the reader, have been "CONNED" and mislead prior to the publication of this very revealing book. NOTHING proves Thomas Jefferson guilty of fathering ANY slave child.

Yes, I too am familiar with seemingly hundreds of e-mails between Dr. Foster and myself in which he was aware of OTHER Jeffersons, namely Randolph, younger brother of Thomas but according to him was unable to get permission from Nature Journal to put tham as possible suspects in the study, space limitations you know. Thus in the absence of this information Nature wrote the damning headline, Jefferson fathers slave's last child. The Carr brothers were the prime suspects in Dr. Foster's study and the "aim" of his study, when DNA eliminated them Nature knew of NO other Jefferson to suspect (they had not received any Foster information to the contrary), thus it just has to be THOMAS.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Steven T. Corneliussen on December 6, 2005
Format: Paperback
I chose five stars because of the author's original research. In my view as a Hemings-Jefferson paternity agnostic who has read both sides' arguments closely, that research in a variety of new sources has enabled the author to shed a substantial amount of new light on the controversy. I read this book carefully soon after it became available in Charlottesville, and I'm not surprised that former Monticello director James A. Bear, Jr., would endorse it by contributing its foreword. Any serious student of the controversy must read this book.

Steven T. Corneliussen

Poquoson, Virginia
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Jefferson Vindicated - Fallacies, Omissions, and Contradictions in the Hemings Genealogical Search: by Cynthia H. Burton

This is an in depth examination of genealogical data and a thorough examination of historical letters involving the Jefferson-Hemings controversy. Fresh from Jefferson country, a local researcher sheds new light on the old legend. For the first time ever, the reader is introduced to the president's younger brother, Randolph Jefferson, and his sons. New findings that focus on the infamous, yet inconclusive DNA; Jefferson's health and his activities; accounts of witnesses; origin of the myth; and the possibility that Sally's children were fathered by other men carrying the Jefferson Y chromosome are discussed and not the infectious political rhetoric designed to destroy Thomas Jefferson's personal character.

Since 1998 and the DNA study, many historians have accepted that the widower Jefferson had an intimate relationship with Hemings, and fathered six children with her, four of whom survived to adulthood. The Thomas Jefferson Foundation (TJF), which runs Monticello, conducted an independent historic review in 2000, as did the National Genealogical Society in 2001; both reported scholars who concluded Jefferson was likely the father of all Hemings' children. In an article that appeared in Science, eight weeks after the DNA study, Eugene Foster, the lead co-author of the DNA study, is reported to have "made it clear that the data establish only that Thomas Jefferson was one of several candidates for the paternity of Eston Hemings.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?