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Jesus Coyote Hardcover – April 4, 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 152 pages
  • Publisher: Raw Dog Screaming Press; 1 edition (April 4, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1933293551
  • ISBN-13: 978-1933293554
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,228,725 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

...intellectually daring and unflinchingly honest look into this revealing and recent chapter of American cultural/criminal history. -- Doug Lain, author Last Week's Apocalypse

...the novel is a shocking and sensitive second-look at Manson-the-myth, told through conflicting points-of-view, at once positioning him as mystic-savior, molestation-victim and psychopath. -- Matthew Irwin

Harold Jaffe, celebrated enemy of convenient mythologies, has re-invented Charles Manson and his 'family' through a brilliantly calculated decomposition of cultural images and historical narratives. What finally emerges is an elegantly carnivalesque narrative headlining Jesus Coyote and his tribe of acolytes. Not surprising to those familiar with his previous books, Jaffe's virtuosic novel manages to be both a richly entertaining read and a penetrating interrogation of official versions of cultural history. -- Stephen-Paul Martin

Unlike the average novel, Jaffe's docufiction style provides witness testimonies, phone transcripts, interrogations, and press conferences. The violence is bloody and brutal; the author's voice is solid and smooth, reeling in the reader and keeping their eyes focused and their fingers turning the pages. -- Midwest Book Review

About the Author

Harold Jaffe is the author of author of ten fiction or creative nonfiction volumes and four novels, including Jesus Coyote, (2008) 15 Serial Killers (2003) and Terror-Dot-Gov (2005) from RDSP, Beyond the Techno-Cave: A Guerrilla Writer's Guide to Post-Millennial Culture, (2007) False Positive, (2002), Sex for the Millennium (1999), Othello Blues (1996), Straight Razor (1995), Eros Anti-Eros (1990), Madonna and Other Spectacles (1988) and Beasts (1986). Jaffe's fiction has appeared in numerous journals and has been widely anthologized. His novels and stories have been translated into German, Japanese, Spanish, French, and Czech. Jaffe is editor-in-chief of Fiction International and Professor of Creative Writing and Literature at San Diego State.

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Customer Reviews

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It is a realistic interpretation that drew me in with its creativity and hooked me with its realistic elements.
Andrew Ramella
The multiple voicings, the clean prose, the ongoing play of ambiguities and transparencies all add up to make Harold Jaffe's Jesus Coyote a very smooth book.
Stephen Martin
Philosophically revolutionary, Jaffe analyzes the subject matter in a Rashoman like format featuring the viewpoint of participants and victims alike.
Maya Yin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kuemmel on May 9, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Harold Jaffe has emerged as the most critically important writer of our time. In the midst of a publishing world full of commercial texts littered with clichéd romance and crime drama; a literary world infected with mass-produced, politically correct "workshop" fiction; and a journalistic world plagued by false "non-fiction" accounts sold by charlatans and purchased by acquiescent conglomerates, Harold Jaffe' work--fiction and "docu-fiction"--offers acute societal insights in the context of innovative, highly energized fictive and literary structures, epistemological investigations, and compelling character portraits.

These are the characteristics which define Jaffe's latest work, JESUS COYOTE, an incisive investigation and portrait of events, characters, social dynamics, and motivations surrounding Charles Manson and his followers. Notably, JESUS COYOTE, refers to actual individuals only obliquely, by action and tangential reference, renaming those individuals involved. Additionally, in the text timelines are inverted and/or conflated to emphasize societal connections. However, it is clear that the motivations for these literary choices have nothing to do with concerns of legalistic accuracy or limitations of artistic license regarding public figures, but rather these literary choices function tropologically to expand the presentation of characters and events such that they can be examined within their larger social contexts, in addition to being viewed individually.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Martin on May 13, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The multiple voicings, the clean prose, the ongoing play of ambiguities and transparencies all add up to make Harold Jaffe's Jesus Coyote a very smooth book. We expect it to be disturbing of course. No surprise there. What catches us off-guard is how engaging it all is, how easily it goes down. I recently watched a Manson documentary, and was surprised at how trite and dull the behavior of Mansion and his women seems now, almost 40 years later. Jaffe has taken what at this point looks like played out subject matter and made it work as literature. No mean feat.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Maya Yin on April 27, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Jaffe continues and extends his 'docufictional' exploration of
'deviance' in his latest novel, "Jesus Coyote," based on the Manson Family murders. With elegant style, Jaffe illuminates that strange moment in history where media coverage of Charles Manson and his counter-culture band of "Family" members held America hostage with the notorious Tate/LaBianca murders. Philosophically revolutionary, Jaffe analyzes the subject matter in a Rashoman like format featuring the viewpoint of participants and victims alike.
As the author so deftly reveals, Revolution is the intent; a revolution of consciousness where Manson is societies' scapegoat and the media driven capitalists the antagonists. Intelligent readers will see the subtle point of how the media circus uses the murders as a means to deflect public attention as far away as possible from the US government approved mass murders in Viet Nam.
These string of "docufictions" continue where "15 Serial Killers" leaves off. Much like "Kissinger," which points out that killing, if it is carried out by Navy Seals or Blackwater mercenaries is "necessary" and "heroic." Here, Jaffe exposes the embedded hypocrisy in each of these strategically architected stories. The result is a carefully crafted tapestry of graphic elegance that is complexly combined with a new revolutionary consciousness. The skill with which the author handles such serious subject matter resonates with his razor-sharp wit and high-beamed laser critique aimed directly at the target.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Derek Pell, Editor DingBat Magazine on April 23, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Harold Jaffe's blistering new novel, JESUS COYOTE (Raw Dog Screaming Press), re-imagines the Manson murders and the myths surrounding the guru at their core. This "docufiction" is Surreality TV--experimental, satirical, poetic, shocking, and on the mark.

Jaffe's vision is like a transcript discovered at a crime scene.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tria Andrews on July 14, 2008
Format: Hardcover
A haunting and unforgettable collage of voices, Harold Jaffe's Jesus Coyote combines fiction and documentary in order to examine the complexities and continued relevance of the Manson "family" murders.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. Koopmans on May 11, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Jaffe's provocative tour de force pastiche of one of the best-known episodes in popular culture history analyzes and undermines the Manson myth.

As with 15 Serial Killers and other texts in his ouvre, Jaffe neither celebrates nor turns away from the violence or the perpetrators of it but looks beyond the easy responses, the media knee-jerk sanctimony, and cable network fetishization of Manson, intimately re-imagining and making new what miles of newsprint and videotape and collective historical amnesia have turned stale.

And beyond all that, it's an enjoyable read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. Irwin on April 21, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The era referred to as the Sixties began in 1958 with the Vietnam War. Also in 1958: Charles Manson finished his first official prison term for a series of crimes and probation violations. In 1971, he was sentenced to death for the Tate-LaBianca murders, though he later received a stay of execution. In 1975, the Vietnam War ended. The relationship between the War and Manson is not causal, though one could argue that if the War created the counterculture movement, then Mason destroyed it. The one to argue this is Harold Jaffe in his new novel, Jesus Coyote. The War itself is not prominent in Jesus Coyote, but its presence is inherent in the subtext (when asked to name his favorite serial killer, "excluding yourself," Jesus Coyote says, "Henry Kissinger. Madonna called him Caca.") Read straight as a docufiction -- Jaffe's signature form -- the novel is a shocking and sensitive second-look at Manson-the-myth, told through conflicting points-of-view, at once positioning him as mystic-savior, molestation-victim and psychopath. Shocking, because the facts of the events are horrific, the blind faith of the Manson "family" is too real to believe. Sensitive, because Jaffe does not withhold, does not judge, and allows points-of-view to flesh themselves out. If read as an allegory, however, Jesus Coyote is a story about the failure of the Sixties counterculture to impact official culture in a lasting way ( Jesus Coyote - the figure of permanent resistance - is in jail for life). The key to this reading is Jaffe's fictional name for Sharon Tate: Naomi Self. Jaffe refers to the killings as "the Self murders" or "the Self killings.Read more ›
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