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Jesus: Last of the Pharaohs Hardcover – Import, January 1, 1998


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Edfu Books; First Edition edition (1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0953191311
  • ISBN-13: 978-0953191314
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.1 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,404,217 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

And Abraham, the original patriarch for Judaism, Islam, and Christianity...was the most convincing of them all.
StuckOnWords
For the open minded, it may sound all swell, however, I have read many such swell theories, and they all sound logical.
Bonam Pak
Ralph Ellis has uncovered incredible insight into the evolution of the theological tenants of Western Civilization.
Rush Allen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 54 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 20, 2003
Format: Paperback
As conspiracy theories go, this is a humdinger. Ellis draws together unlikely bits of flotsam and jetsam of bible and archeological history to develop a compelling tale of a very human motivation for the New Testament. As he would have us consider, Paul's divine Jesus is the puffed up remant of a the story of a very human but ambitious royal exile. As a descendant of Moses (forget David as revisionist history), Jesus was actually a Hyksos king and of the royal bloodline of Egypt. All the references to the Kingdom were actually him speaking of his shadow nation living in Palestine. And since he was Pharoah, he was God. No wonder he referred to himself as the Son of God as his father, also a Pharoah, was also God. No wonder the Romans let the Jews crucify him - he was a seditious rebel ! For those who like alternative views of accepted history, this is a good starter in a four book series by Ellis. Be prepared to wade through details as he tends to make his case by endless lists of facts. But he makes you want to know more.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Sami on March 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
It is nice to see a book that does not simply trot out the same old arguments all pillaged from other books and other authors. If nothing else, readers will find that Ellis' work is highly original and deeply thought provoking. Yes, it is true that his arguments are not entirely proven, but it is also true that he has systematically taken apart the traditional interpretations placed upon the biblical texts.

The central thesis, that the Israelite leaders were actually the Hyksos pharaohs of Egypt, has a distinct ring of truth to it. I, for one, think Ellis is probably right here, but of course this small change changes every aspect of the biblical story.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By StuckOnWords on March 21, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Could there be a more provocative premise? Ellis' book proposes that Jesus was one of a long line of Egyptian pharaohs. If you're going to read this, you have to decide in advance if you're going to give it a fair ear, or if you're going to dismiss the entire idea right from the outset.

I had an open mind, with no vested self-interest, for or against. I wanted to hear what he had to say. As I went along, I realized I was going to have to accept that not everything Ellis said was going to be set on solid ground. But that didn't have to invalidate everything. I came to realize that if he could convince me, beyond reasonable doubt, that even ONE of the biblical patriarchs was actually a pharaoh, then EVERYTHING else we've "learned" suddenly falls flat on its face.

Folks...his analysis of Abraham sold me. Sold! It was the most convincing of all the patriarchs, and one he addressed very early in the book. I was completely sold on Ellis' reasoning, and then he got to the coup de gras: the mambre tree. I almost fell over. He had already convinced me, and then he made that connection. From there on out, I had no choice but to at least give his ideas a fair shake.

Do I think he proved all his ideas? Not at all. Some theories didn't have enough evidence to completely prove anything. But if ONE patriarch can be reasonably be proven to be a pharaoh, doesn't everything else we know suddenly fall flat? And Abraham, the original patriarch for Judaism, Islam, and Christianity...was the most convincing of them all. From there, all bets are off.

This book changed my view of not only history, but present society. Suddenly the whole world looks like a different place to me. If you're open to a life-changing experience, read this book.
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Rush Allen on September 9, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ralph Ellis has uncovered incredible insight into the evolution of the theological tenants of Western Civilization. His presentation is typical modern academic "rational material" perspective, and the reader needs to restore the ancient perspective to the wisdom Ellis uncovers. Ellis uses the words "lateral thinking" as a way of inserting his own intuitive perspectives. This serves him and the reader very well.

On the other hand, Ellis is not presenting a religious book, and in general, he avoids the religious perspective of the ancients. This causes him to focus on the earth bound perspectives of the archaeology. To restore the holistic images behind the ancient perspective it is mandatory that the ancient metaphysics be applied. Metaphysics was the focus of all monumental cultures. They were driven by the desire for "higher science" rather than the mundane quest for "material science." The ancients saw the universe through rational material perceptions and emotional spiritual perspectives. In fact, their primary objective in the monuments they created was to save the lost emotional spiritual perspective of a primordial Golden Age when "higher science" represented the "Word of God."

A reader who comprehends the repressed metaphysics of modern Western culture will recognize the evolutionary path of our heritage through all of the books Ellis has written on the genre. Unfortunately, most readers are looking for entertainment rather than evolutionary theological wisdom. They will be biased to see the Pharaoh Jesus in the books of Ellis rather than the God Jesus, which the ancients were attempting to convey. To those few who seek Divine Truth and have the perseverance to pass between these "clashing rocks," the Dove of Peace will emerge in the Elysian Field of the Golden Age when Pharaohs were Great Houses of the Creator's Dream of Eternal Life.
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