Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $36.99
  • Save: $7.15 (19%)
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Jesus the Messiah: Tracin... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: ex library book with all the stamps and stickers, book in veeeeeery good shape, shelf wear on the covers, book did not circulate.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Jesus the Messiah: Tracing the Promises, Expectations, and Coming of Israel's King Hardcover – November 9, 2012

4.5 out of 5 stars 33 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$29.84
$23.61 $25.99

2016 Book Awards
Browse award-winning titles. See all 2016 winners
$29.84 FREE Shipping. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Jesus the Messiah: Tracing the Promises, Expectations, and Coming of Israel's King
  • +
  • Messiah in the Old Testament, The
Total price: $46.73
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

"The authors provide a masterful synthesis of the teaching of the Messiah in the Old Testament, the context of Judaism, and in the New Testament. By intentionally addressing the contextual, canonical, messianic, and christological readings of all the key texts, and asserting how these grew and developed in their interpretation into the Christian era, these three scholars, each with expertise in expounding the message of the relevant texts, provide the reader with a clear path for understanding the fulfillment of the messianic expectaion in Jesus Christ as more than just a collection of diverse prophecies. This is the most useful work to date on the subject." (Richard S. Hess, Earl S. Kalland Professor of Old Testament and Semitic Languages Denver Seminary 2012-12-01)

"Resisting the impulse to impose later visions of the Messiah upon earlier texts, they have offered a fair and balanced picture of a gradually revealed but vibrant and persistent thread of biblical belief. Thoroughly researched, logically organized, and lavishly illustrated, this volume represents the finest full length treatment of the subject available." (Daniel Block, Gunther H. Knoedler Professor of Old Testament Wheaton College 2012-12-01)

"I like the authors' distinction between a text's original, contextual meaning and the canonical significance ultimately given to it, and their progression from Old Testament to New via second temple Jewish literature." (Leslie C. Allen, Senior Professor of Old Testament Fuller Theological Seminary 2012-12-01)

"Bateman, Bock, and Johnston have definitely filled a gaping hole in this crucial area with their new work and done so artfully while specializing in their respective fields―Old Testament, second temple literature, and New Testament. It is about time we have a detailed discussion on this important area from evangelical scholars bridging this whole time period. Their discussions are nuanced and carefully worded, avoiding many pitfalls of either extremes and yet providing a very readable and clear work. Especially helpful is their progressive development in which they have highlighted crucial themes related to the Messiah throughout the biblical and non-canonical works. Whether one agrees or disagrees with all of their conclusions, there is no doubt that they have provided a workable, clear foundation in this area that will spawn many lively discussions into the future." (Paul D. Wegner, Professor of Old Testament Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary 2012-12-01)

About the Author

Herbert W. Bateman IV (PhD, Dallas Th eological Seminary) has taught Greek language and exegesis for more than twenty years. He is the  Author or editor of many works on the General Epistles, including Charts on the Book of Hebrews, Four Views on the Warning Passages in Hebrews, and a forthcoming commentary on Jude and 2 Peter.



Gordon H. Johnston (ThD, Dallas Theological Seminary) is associate professor of Old Testament Studies at Dallas Theological Seminary. He has spent a number of years sifting through archaeological digs. In addi- tion to his work in the field, Dr. John- ston has published numerous articles and essays in scholarly journals.

Darrell L. Bock is Executive Director of Cultural Engagement and Senior Research Professor of New Testament Studies at Dallas Theological Seminary. A former president of the Evangelical Theological Society, he is the author of the best-selling Breaking the Da Vinci Code and numerous works in New Testament studies, including Jesus According to Scripture.

 

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Interested in the Audiobook Edition?
If you’re the author, publisher, or rights holder of this book, let ACX help you produce the audiobook.Learn more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Kregel Academic (November 9, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0825421098
  • ISBN-13: 978-0825421099
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,021,750 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By J. West on January 22, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I have to confess at the very start that when I first noticed this title I was exceedingly skeptical of it. I imagined that it would be a sort of fundamentalist attempt to justify the worst kind of eisegesis which sees in the Old Testament, behind every tree and in every bush, foreshadowings of Jesus and little more than a flattening of the entire text to a `See, Jesus is lurking here too' exercise in frustration. I - furthermore - imagined that it would be laced with annoying citations from maniacal Church Fathers like Ambrose and Cyprian and Justin and Augustine who just couldn't stop themselves from being wrong in their readings of the Old Testament. And, finally, in my preconceptions I did preconceive that this book would be of little use.

I was, I am honestly glad to say, wrong on each count. This volume is excellently written and sensitively done with an acute eye directed both at the Old Testament context of the texts in question and one at the Reception History which those texts evoked (and yes, it seems everyone is doing Reception History these days, even if they don't call it by its proper name).

This volume is comprised of three major sections: Part I: Promises of a King in which Gordon Johnston discusses `messianic trajectories' in various books of the Old Testament (including Genesis, Amos, the Psalms, Isaiah, and Jeremiah among others). Surprisingly, in his discussion of Isaiah, Johnston skips Chapter 7, which I confess to finding singularly odd. Otherwise his treatment is nicely done, as he examines first the Old Testament context of the passages in question and then their `canonical' meaning.

Part II: Expectations of a King by Herbert Bateman IV deals with the thorniest of questions.
Read more ›
1 Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
JESUS THE MESSIAH
Herbert W. Bateman IV, Darrell L. Bock, Gordon H Johnson
Kregel Academic, Grand Rapids, Michigan 2012, 527 pages

Just looking at this book is impressive. The Publisher has done an outstanding job in layout and printing. Normally such books as this are not printed in color. This is an exception. Not only this, but the graphic charts, sidebars, and maps are remarkable, and really aid the reader in understanding the concepts. Even the headings are also printed in color. This is done all at a reasonable price.

The content is likewise impressive. It traces the idea of messiahship throughout the Bible. The book is divided into three sections, with a different author writing the section.

Gordon Johnson writes section one: “The Promise of a King,” which consists of the first seven chapters of the book. It centers upon the contextual and canonical trajectories through the Old Testament. He carefully deals with the progressive stages of revelation of the Messiah. He follows the trail through the major sections of the Old Testament from the patriarchs to the prophets. He sees the concept of messiah as rooted, not with the fall of man, but with the promises given to Abraham and the patriarchs. He sees both far and near elements (fulfillments) to the promises, with the ultimate fulfillment as messianic. He deals with the major messiah passages in a fair and balanced way, yet completely evangelical in his approach. He treats Genesis 3:15 under an appendix of its own which he sees as not an explicit messianic text. To me this is one of the most interesting chapters in the book, and worthwhile whether you agree or disagree with his view.

Herbert Batemen is the author of section two: “Expectation of a King.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Jesus the Messiah: Tracing the Promises, Expectations, and Coming of Israel's King has been on my nightstand for a while - and for good reason. It's one of those books that you have to `chew' on for a while. And while it's definitely not a quick read, it is one I recommend adding to your theological library.

Divided into three sections, the authors look at the themes of the Messiah in the promises of the Old Testament, reflections and expectations drawn from Intertestamental literature, and the arrival of Jesus recorded in the New Testament.

What makes this book different from other books about the Messiah? The authors' approach to surveying the three divisions of Messianic testimony. Rather than committing the hermeneutical error of "eisegesis" (reading Jesus back into messianic prophecies), the authors contend the Old Testament authors were divinely inspired to use "open" language that would be later fulfilled by Christ.

So-called "messianic" texts are not to be understood as exclusively Messianic - but intended to point to representative royal leaders of the Davidic line, of which Jesus Christ is the ultimately fulfillment. Basically, rather than reading into the text something that isn't there, the authors emphasize the progressive nature of the identity of the ideal Davidic king as seen in the OT & NT and reflective literature from the Intertestamental period.

What I loved about the book:
1. Overall, this is a beautiful book with full-color charts, indexes, maps, etc.., and a very impressive epilogue dedicated to interpreting Gen. 3:15.

2. The authors incorporate insight from literature of the Second Temple era (the time that spans the two testaments). Why is this a big deal since these texts are not inspired?
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Jesus the Messiah: Tracing the Promises, Expectations, and Coming of Israel's King
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: Jesus the Messiah: Tracing the Promises, Expectations, and Coming of Israel's King

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: bibles, christology