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Jesus' Parable of the Rich Fool: Luke 12:13-34 Among Ancient Conversations on Death and Possessions (Society of Biblical Literature Early Christianity and Its Li) Paperback – October 3, 2011


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Product Details

  • Series: Society of Biblical Literature Early Christianity and Its Li
  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Society of Biblical Literature (October 3, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1589836146
  • ISBN-13: 978-1589836143
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,015,568 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Matthew S. Rindge is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Gonzaga University. He is co-author of the forthcoming The History of Biblical Interpretation to 1835: A Reader (Westminster John Knox) and the recipient of the 2011 Paul J. Achtemeier Award for New Testament Scholarship.

About the Author

Matthew S. Rindge (Ph.D., Emory University) is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Gonzaga University (Spokane, WA). Rindge previously taught at Emory University, Columbia Theological Seminary, Azusa Pacific University, and in many Asian and Latin American countries. At Gonzaga he teaches "Life and Teachings of Jesus," "Bible and Film," and "Bible and Contemporary Ethics."

His research interests include Jesus' Parables, the Synoptic Gospels and Acts, Wisdom Literature, Intertextuality, and various intersections of Bible and Contemporary Culture. He speaks about these topics regularly at churches and universities.

Dr. Rindge is the author of Jesus' Parable of the Rich Fool: Luke 12:13-34 among Ancient Conversations on Death and Possessions (SBL's Early Christianity and Its Literature series, 2011). He has published articles on diverse topics (Qoheleth/Ecclesiastes, Jewish Identity, Mark's Gospel and Social Outcasts, Teaching the Bible and Film) in Journal of Biblical Literature, Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Teaching Theology and Religion, and Journal of Lutheran Ethics. He has also written for public outlets such as The Huffington Post and Sojourners. He is currently co-writing The History of Biblical Interpretation to 1835: A Reader (Westminster John Knox Press).

In the Society of Biblical Literature, he serves on the steering committees for the Bible and American Popular Culture section and the Bible and Film Consultation. In 2011, Dr. Rindge received the Paul J. Achtemeier Award in New Testament Scholarship for his paper "Reconfiguring the Akedah and Lamenting God: Mark's Theological Narrative of Divine Abandonment."

More About the Author

Matthew S. Rindge (Ph.D., Emory University) is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Gonzaga University (Spokane, WA). Rindge previously taught at Emory University, Columbia Theological Seminary, Azusa Pacific University, and in many Asian and Latin American countries. At Gonzaga he teaches "Life and Teachings of Jesus," "Bible and Film," and "Bible and Contemporary Ethics."

His research interests include Jesus' Parables, the Synoptic Gospels and Acts, Wisdom Literature, Intertextuality, and various intersections of Bible and Contemporary Culture. He speaks about these topics regularly at churches and universities.

Dr. Rindge is the author of Jesus' Parable of the Rich Fool: Luke 12:13-34 among Ancient Conversations on Death and Possessions (SBL's Early Christianity and Its Literature series, 2011). He has published articles on diverse topics (Qoheleth/Ecclesiastes, Jewish Identity, Mark's Gospel and Social Outcasts, Teaching the Bible and Film) in Journal of Biblical Literature, Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Teaching Theology and Religion, and Journal of Lutheran Ethics. He has also written for public outlets such as The Huffington Post and Sojourners. He is currently co-writing The History of Biblical Interpretation to 1835: A Reader (Westminster John Knox Press).

In the Society of Biblical Literature, he serves on the steering committees for the Bible and American Popular Culture section and the Bible and Film Consultation. In 2011, Dr. Rindge received the Paul J. Achtemeier Award in New Testament Scholarship for his paper "Reconfiguring the Akedah and Lamenting God: Mark's Theological Narrative of Divine Abandonment."

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By R. J. Karris on September 18, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book is a revised version of a dissertation completed at Emory University in 2008. The first chapter deals with "Luke's Parable of the Rich Fool (12:16-21): Interpreting Its History of Interpretation." Chapter two is titled: "The Interplay of Death and Possessions in Qoheleth and Ben Sira." Chapter three continues looking at Jewish background materials: "The Interplay of Death and Possessions in 1 Enoch and the Testament of Abraham." Chapter four moves the conversation to the larger non-Jewish world: "The Interplay of Death and Possessions in Lucian and Seneca." Chapter five returns the reader to the Lukan text: "Luke 12:13-34: Participating in a Second Temple Conversation on the Interplay of Death and Possessions." Chapter six brings Jewish sapiential texts to bear: "The Rich Man's Folly in Light of Sapiental Texts and the Parable's Immediate Literary Context." Chapter seven deepens the conversation: "Luke 12:13-34: Reconfiguring Second Temple Conversations on Death and Possessions." The small chapter eight deals with the comparison of the Parable of the Rich Fool in Luke and the Gnostic Gospel of Thomas. The conclusion bears the title "Illustrating Wisdom."

On p. 239 Rindge presents his conclusion: "Luke's parable of the rich fool is not 'an example story' merely providing a negative example to be avoided, nor is it simply a 'critique of the rich.' The parable and its immediate literary context participate, reconfigure, and illustrate a highly contested Second Temple sapiental conversation regarding the meaningful use of goods given life's fragility and death's inevitability, uncertain timing, and potential imminence.
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