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Jesus is like my Scanning Electron Microscope: (a scientist looks at his relationship with the Creator) Paperback – March 20, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 70 pages
  • Publisher: iUniverse (March 20, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0595492983
  • ISBN-13: 978-0595492985
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 5.9 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,553,555 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Mark H. Armitage studied biology and plant pathology at the University of Florida. He holds a B.S., an M.S. (biology) and a graduate level Ed.S. degree in science education. Mark has over 50 publications in secular and Christian science journals. He is a member of the American Society of Parasitologists and the Microscopy Society of America. He has served as the President of the Southern California Society for Microscopy and Microanalysis for several years and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Creation Research Society. His electron microscope laboratory is located at the Creation Research Society Van Andel Research Center in Arizona.

Customer Reviews

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I would highly recommend this book for kids and adults.
C. Froede Jr.
Since I was already familiar with the author's work in scientific journals, I was very interested to see what he would do with a book of this off-beat title.
Lane P. Lester
Actually, science was once called natural theology and parallels such as Armitage made were once very common.
Darwin Researcher

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Darby M'Graw on December 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
To understand this book correctly, the reader should pay attention to this disclaimer from the copyright page: "This is a work of fiction. All of the characters, names, incidents, organizations, and dialogue in this novel are either the products of the author's imagination or are used fictitiously." With that understood, the remainder of the book will make more sense.

Here's another odd quirk, from the Acknowledgements page: "The author greatly acknowledges the assistance of the anonymous reviewers of this manuscript." This is a bit odd. Is the author of the impression that this is a peer-reviewed scientific work? It most assuredly is not.

This book is a personal testimonial from Armitage, and a shallow comparison of the practice of electron microscopy to his Christian religion. It is rather short. Amazon lists it at 72 pages, but that apparently includes the table of contents, title page, list of illustrations, preface, etc. Not counting that stuff, there are 49 numbered pages. The testimonial and narrative are finished by page 21, with the remainder of the book taken up by micrographs which the author found interesting. There are many photos even in the first half of the book. I was able to read the entire volume cover to cover in an hour.

The book does not contain much science. Brief descriptions are included of how to prepare samples for electron microscopy, with dehydration, fixing and metal staining or coating, (which are used as metaphors for Christianity) but nowhere are the principles of either light or electron microscopy explained. Photos chosen for inclusion seem to have been selected on the basis of visual interest, with no attempt to explain their scientific value.
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34 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Club Ed on September 29, 2009
Format: Paperback
I was having trouble with my scanning electron microscope, and I could not figure out where to turn for solutions. I suspected that the fundamental problem would lie in my lanthanum hexaboride cathodes, but the vacuum system was recently upgraded and its field emission guns are the best thermally-assisted Schottky guns that money can buy. I tried blowing on my zirconium oxide emitters, since that usually does the trick, but alas, something was still not right.

Then one day I stumbled across "Jesus is like my Scanning Electron Microscope" and I knew that somewhere inside I would find all of the answers that I needed! My suspicions were correct - it turns out that I was treating my electron microscope as if it were a piece of scientific equipment, instead of treating it as if it were my God. At once, I accepted my scanning electron microscope as my Lord and personal Savior, I bathed myself in its electron flow (which was tricky), and I began to preach its Good Data to everyone I encountered. I would endlessly read passages from the user manual, such as my favorite, from the book of SEM 8-4500, Chapter 9, Section 1:2, which tells us:

> The safety considerations are very minimal
> when using the scanning electron microscope.
> You are protected from all of the inner workings
> of the microscope by the plastic casing.

Could anything be more true in this topsy-turvy world of ours? I think we all would like to be protected from the "inner workings" of things. All we must do is give ourselves up to the scanning electron microscope, and its plastic casing.

But the important thing to me is how this has affected my life. I was looking for answers from my electron microscope. I wanted it to do things for me.
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Carl J. Grindley on August 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
I feel strangely obligated to intervene to defend this book's author on a few technical points. First, a book with 49 numbered pages is indeed a "book." Matter of fact, 49 pages is the internationally approved minimum page count for a "book." Second, most books published today are vetted by anonymous reviewers prior to publication. In the academic trade, this is called peer review, but in the rest of the publishing world, it's simply how things are done. Books that are not vetted in some way are usually self-published crap. As far as the wisdom of a trained scientist likening an instrument whose operation invokes quantum uncertainty to some sort of relationship with a quasi-mythological figure, I think that the first review more or less makes some valuable points. Personally, I'd rather read a book titled "My Scanning Electron Microscope is like my Electron Scanning Microscope: (a scientist looks at his relationship with the very very very small).
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5 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Darwin Researcher on October 23, 2009
Format: Paperback
I found this book both very readable and very interesting. It covered much basic information, and the pictures (much of the book) were fascinating. My interest related to the fact that a good part of my graduate work was in SEM, TEM and Light microscopy and, like the author, I had a good medical microscopy since Jr. High School which I spent hours working with, examining everything I could find. I also always enjoy biographies and the short bio in this book helped me to understand where the author was coming from. The SEM pictures were all in black and white, not colorized as is now the fad. I always have to explain to students that SEM cannot produce color images and the colors are in the mind of the author. The main objection to this book seems to be the title. The criticism of the author was actually most interesting. For example, one reviewer said: "It's sad how anybody could enjoy writing a book of analogies between SEM and god or whatever you call this. What a waste of time." Why in the world is this sad? Is it illegal to believe in God? Immoral? Criminal? It seems to me that the war against God and those who believe in him is escalating and, on the part of the non-theists, getting very nasty, as reviews of this book document. I thought that the parallels between science and theology were well done. After all, modern science came from theology. Actually, science was once called natural theology and parallels such as Armitage made were once very common. As a collector of old science books I have noted that this book fits perfectly into the two books view, the book of nature and the book of God, the Bible, are both part of God's revelation as taught by theological schools for centuries and preached by ministers even longer.
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