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Jethro Tull A+ (w/ Bonus DVD)

Jethro TullAudio CD
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)

Price: $23.83 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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Music

Image of album by Jethro Tull

Photos

Image of Jethro Tull

Videos

Thick As A Brick 2 Video Trailer

Biography

Early in 1968, a group of young British musicians, born from the ashes of various failed regional bands gathered together in hunger, destitution and modest optimism in Luton, North of London. With a common love of Blues and an appreciation, between them, of various other music forms, they started to win over a small but enthusiastic audience in the various pubs and clubs of Southern England. ... Read more in Amazon's Jethro Tull Store

Visit Amazon's Jethro Tull Store
for 163 albums, 23 photos, videos, discussions, and more.

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Jethro Tull A+ (w/ Bonus DVD) + Catfish Rising + Rock Island
Price for all three: $50.11

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 20, 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Parlophone
  • ASIN: B0001XAMKO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #33,383 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Crossfire
2. Flyingdale Flyer
3. Working John, Working Joe
4. Black Sunday
5. Protect And Survive
6. Batteries Not Included
7. Uniform
8. 4.W.D. (Low Ratio)
9. The Pine Marten's Jig
10. And Further On
Disc: 2
1. Introduction (DVD)
2. Black Sunday (DVD)
3. Dun Ringill (DVD)
4. Flyingdale Flyer (DVD)
5. Songs From The Wood (DVD)
6. Heavy Horses (DVD)
7. Sweet Dream (DVD)
8. Too Old To Rock 'n' Roll Too Young To Die (DVD)
9. Skating Away On The Thin Ice Of The New Day (DVD)
10. Aqualung (DVD)
See all 11 tracks on this disc

Editorial Reviews

This CD/DVD combination pack, in a jewel case, features the digitally remastered CD "A" and the bonus DVD "Slipstream", which features 60 minutes of classic, live footage from the 1980 concert in Los Angeles, along with 2+ music videos.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
59 of 65 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 3 Stars For "A" Album, But 4 Stars For CD/DVD Package August 13, 2004
Format:Audio CD
1980's "A" is a very controversial Jethro Tull album. It started out as a solo album for Tull leader Ian Anderson, who brought in ace keyboardist/violinist Eddie Jobson, drummer Mark Craney and bassist Dave Pegg to help him record it. But Anderson *also* brought in Tull guitarist Martin Barre to play on the album, which was to have a major impact on what would happen next. With his solo album finished, Anderson delivered it to the record company execs at Chrysalis Records. Upon hearing it, the Chrysalis bigwigs *strongly* advised Anderson to release the album under the Jethro Tull name. Before Anderson could make a proper decision about it, Chrysalis went ahead and announced to the press that "A" was the new Jethro Tull album, featuring a new lineup. Thus, Tull veterans Barriemore Barlow, John Evan, and David Palmer were no longer in the band. As Anderson says in the new liner notes, the trio were "understandably and rightfully p----d off."But what of the "A" album itself? Well, to be perfectly honest, "A" (for Anderson, in case you're curious) is my least favorite Jethro Tull album, but it certainly isn't bad. Half of the songs are quite strong: "Crossfire," "Flyingdale Flyer," "Black Sunday," "4.W.D. (Low Ratio)" and the brilliant "Working John Working Joe" (by far the album's best song) are all excellent Tull rockers. The rest of the songs on "A" are decent and listenable, but...well...they just lack something. They don't grab me. In other words, they kinda go in one ear and out the other. Still, at the end of the day, 5 great songs out of 10 ain't bad, and the band's performances are consistently good. "A" isn't a Tull masterpiece, but it's good enough. So, my rating for Jethro Tull's "A" album alone: 3 stars. However.... Read more ›
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36 of 40 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, Really?!? October 14, 2004
Format:Audio CD
At first blush, you may think that I've sacrificed any credibility I've ever had by giving "A" four stars. This album, by most people's account, is the smelly cheese in the pantry of the entire Tull discography; but please hear me out.
I will admit that this album is not perfect. After all, this was a band in transition. Meant to be a solo Anderson project, the old band mates that had pumped out one amazing album after another for most of a decade had disbanded, leaving only Ian and Martin Barre to carry on the name. Dave Craney had the unenviable task of replacing Barrie(more) Barlow, the most energetic and dexterous of all the JT percussionists. Eddie Jobson was doing the work of both John Evans and David (now Dee) Palmer. The bright spot in the new lineup was the inclusion of our old friend, David Pegg; certainly the most entertaining and personable of all the Tull Bassists, who remained with the band for another 10 or 12 years.

As for the music; there are a few memorable tunes here. Widely acknowledged as the best song on the album, BLACK SUNDAY is a ripping good tune that, if nothing else, demonstrates Ian's ability to string together a whole mess of words without taking a breath (try singing along and you'll see). THE PINE MARTIN'S JIG has long been one of my favorite instrumental pieces. Wickedly complex in it's ever changing time signatures, this had to be a bear to play live. While not much of a song lyrically, I have to admit that PROTECT AND SURVIVE has one of the most infectious flute licks Ian has ever written. I find myself humming or whistling the intro to that song frequently.

Stylistically, this album resembles Ian's eventual and actual first solo album, INTO THE LIGHT.
Read more ›
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Four stars....Really?!? April 29, 2004
Format:Audio CD
At first blush, you may think that I've sacrificed any credibility I've ever had by giving "A" four stars. This album, by most people's account, is the smelly cheese in the pantry of the entire Tull discography; but please hear me out.
I will admit that this album is not perfect. After all, this was a band in transisition. Meant to be a solo Anderson project, the old band mates that had pumped out one amazing album after another for most of a decade had disbanded, leaving only Ian and Martin Barre to carry on the name. Dave Craney had the unenviable task of replacing Barrie(more) Barlow, the most energetic and dexterous of all the JT percussionists. Eddie Jobson was doing the work of both John Evans and David (now Dee) Palmer. The bright spot in the new lineup was the inclusion of our old friend, David Pegg; certainly the most entertaining and personable of all the Tull Bassists, who remained with the band for another 10 or 12 years.
As for the music; there are a few memorable tunes here. Widely acknowledged as the best song on the album, BLACK SUNDAY is a ripping good tune that, if nothing else, demonstrates Ian's ability to string together a whole mess of words without taking a breath (try singing along and you'll see). THE PINE MARTIN'S JIG has long been one of my favorite instrumental pieces. Wickedly complex in it's ever changing time signatures, this had to be a bear to play live. While not much of a song lyrically, I have to admit that PROTECT AND SURVIVE has one of the most infectious flute licks Ian has ever written. I find myself humming or whistling the intro to that song frequently.
Stylistically, this album resembles Ian's eventual and actual first solo album, INTO THE LIGHT.
Read more ›
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Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Excelent
Published 1 month ago by Monica Aguirre
4.0 out of 5 stars A greatly maligned album, with reason, but still worthwhile
Ok, Black Sunday. That's the worthwhile part. You can almost forget the rest of the album, although Pine Marten's Jig and And Further On are pleasant enough. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Dr. Curmudgeon
3.0 out of 5 stars Turned a corner
This album marked a change from the old Tull. It's OK, but just don't have the sound and power of the original band.
Published 15 months ago by Old Book Reader
1.0 out of 5 stars The Worst
I have no idea what happened to Jethro Tull (and Ian Anderson) in the 70s. Whatever it was, it must have been a really traumatic experience because everything up through "Thick As... Read more
Published 17 months ago by MJH
5.0 out of 5 stars An example of Tull at their best
I bought this album when it first came out and played it to death, recently bought the cd and it stands the test of time. Read more
Published 18 months ago by mlewis
2.0 out of 5 stars DON'T BUY THE DVD EDITION! HERE'S WHY
Someone thought that it would be clever to apply multicolored "after-image" special effects, or other, equally dizzying visuals, to the musicians' bodies as they leaped... Read more
Published 19 months ago by John T. R. Gorman
5.0 out of 5 stars Review
This is a keeper in my collection: When this came out I got it on vinyl, and I like it still today. One reason was that it had a different, new sound that was not the standard JT... Read more
Published on June 3, 2012 by Mikusha
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Tull That Never Was
Ooookay. I know I'm gonna get a lot of flak here, but I'll say it anyway:
This is my favorite Jethro Tull album. Period. Read more
Published on May 23, 2012 by L. M. Gulick
5.0 out of 5 stars El cambio al Rock Electrónico está aqui
Este no es un album típico de los Tull, la banda se había desecho con la muerte de John Gascock en 1979 y Anderson planeaba lanzar su primero disco en solitario. Read more
Published on December 12, 2011 by lsolv
5.0 out of 5 stars Underrated Album
Originally intended to be a Ian Anderson solo album, the record company had it billed as a Jethro Tull album. Read more
Published on January 3, 2011 by Sean
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