Deadwood 3 Seasons 2004

prime

Available on Prime
Season 1
Available on Prime
(5,871) IMDb 8.5/10

11. Jewel's Boot Is Made for Walking TV-MA CC

Alma's father, Otis Russell, arrives to 'help' with her claim. Swearengen strikes a bargain with Adams to rid him of some legal baggage; Leon and Sawyer resume work at the Bella Union; Bullock is angered by the choice of a new sheriff.

Starring:
Timothy Olyphant, Ian McShane
Runtime:
59 minutes
Original air date:
June 6, 2004

Available to watch on supported devices.

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.
Season 1

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

477 of 506 people found the following review helpful By Jason Whitt VINE VOICE on November 5, 2004
Format: DVD
The best kept secret on television is Deadwood, a semi-true story of the lawless town in South Dakota that popped up during the gold rush days of the 1800's. The real Deadwood boasted legendary residents like Calamity Jane and Wild Bill Hickock. Both figure prominently as characters in the TV series but are far from the only great characters on display.

Perhaps you've heard of the series, but never gave it a look. Or perhaps you were warned by others that the language was so profane as to render it unwatchable. True, the series isn't for anyone under the age of 18, but it must be understood that this semi-historical piece was written to represent the actual dialect and social tenor of the region at that time. Deadwood was a rough place without real law, and gold was on everyone's mind. All the elements for great drama were there. Greed, corruption, deceipt, innocence, morality (or a lack thereof), hope, hate, fear, addiction, murder, jealousy and love. Deadwood truly represents a kind of sociological study of human evolution within a laissez faire society.

It was clear from episode 1 that the new Deadwood series on HBO was something special. By episode 4, I was certain that Emmy nominations/awards were imminent. The show was largely ignored by the Emmys, likely sufferering from a combination of "newcomer syndrome" and overshadowing by The Sopranos. But make no mistake, it was more than worthy with the actors comprising a splendid balance of the familiar and the unfamiliar. Regardless of fame however, there isn't an off performance to be found in the season. Nor is there a grossly derivitive one. The characters are all satisfyingly deep, nuanced and often downright quirky.
Read more ›
13 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
78 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Wayne Klein HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 13, 2005
Format: DVD
This is my nominee for best new drama. This revisionist western will knock your socks off with its fascinating characters and atmosphere. It's May 1876 former Montana marshal Seth Bullock (Timothy Olyphant) and his business partner Sol Star (John Hawkes) open a hardware business in the gold-mining town of Deadwood, South Dakota. Deadwood becomes the crossroads for the famous, infamous and the people they kill. Bullock meets Wild Bill Hickok (Keith Carradine) and has a run in with Gem Saloon owner Al Swearengen (Ian McShane). Swearengen lives up to his name; he's a man with the foulest mouth one can imagine and a pretty nasty fellow to cross. McShane's portrayal of Swearengen makes him one of the most complex villans this side of Tony Soprano.

"Deadwood" becomes the nexus for some of the most important figures of the old west creating a great opportunity for storytelling from writer/creator/producer David Milch ("NYPD Blue"). A sprawling, down and dirty revisionist western, the pilot directed by Walter Hill ("Southern Comfort", "Hard Times", "The Warriors") features marvelous performances from Ian McShane, Brad Dourif, Timothy Olyphant, Molly McShane, Keith Carradine and Powers Boothe. Authentic right down to the pig crap, "Deadwood" features the great dialogue, action and storytelling skills we've come to expect from Milch, Hill and the other collaborators on this cable TV series. A warning for viewers--you'll hear a lot of bad words because, well, because Milch feels that folks spoke like that back then.

There may only be 12 episodes included here but they're all high quality. My only complaint is that the series probably could have been packaged with more episodes per disc making the set less cumbersome.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
46 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Adam C. Donnelly on February 10, 2005
Format: DVD
Deadwood, the latest product from David Milch, is an intelligent, authenic and foulmouthed western that just actually may be one of the most well written shows of all time. You can put up on the same pedestal as Milch's Hill Street Blues, West Wing, X-files and the Sopranos, all of which exemplify continuously unflawed scriptwriting which is a real feat for weekly ongoing dramas. Set in the squalid, illegal town of Deadwood, South Dakota, the show recreates a hyperrealistic, gritty vision of the old west without dispensing the classic iconography and romanticism we usually associate with it. The formula is there: lawless town, the hero rides in, there's the mustached coniving villain, the damsel, the weasel, the harlot, the sidekick, the town drunk, the quick draw, the indian; everything we expect to see is there and it shows it to us in a way we can actually beleve in, it refuses to compromise the integrity of it's vision by avoiding offense to viewers. It tries very hard to recreate a time period and never glosses over 19th century life where everyone walks around in pressed, clean clothes, clean streets sitting inside under flourescent lighting instead of lanterns. Gunsmoke it ain't. It takes the classic modern western cliche and turns them into a harsh brutal reality, propelling it with some seriously guttaral, poetic 19th century dialougue. This is seriously action packed dialogue, folks, that'll rattle and richocet in your mind for awhile and the cast is just awesome across the board. Keith Carradine is tragic and powerful as the tired, burned out Wild Bill; Timothy Olyphant as the angry hero, Seth Bullock, Molly Parker as the grieving widdow and Brad Douriff is terrific as the tormented town doctor.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again