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Jewish Cooking in America: Expanded Edition (Knopf Cooks American) Hardcover – September 8, 1998


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Frequently Bought Together

Jewish Cooking in America: Expanded Edition (Knopf Cooks American) + Joan Nathan's Jewish Holiday Cookbook + Arthur Schwartz's Jewish Home Cooking: Yiddish Recipes Revisited
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Product Details

  • Series: Knopf Cooks American
  • Hardcover: 544 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf; Expanded edition (September 8, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375402764
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375402760
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #246,703 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Joan Nathan, an American, author of The Children's Jewish Holiday Kitchen, lived in Jerusalem for three years. Her review of Jewish-American cuisine contains more than 300 kosher recipes, with added information on Jewish dietary laws and Jewish culture, drawing from both Sephardic and Ashkenazic traditions. She gives Old World cooking extensive coverage, including foods from Bukhara, Salonika, Israel and Georgia, and writes knowledgeably of New World adaptations. The recipes cover Jewish standards, like homemade bagels and pickled herring and more American-influenced dishes like Cajun matzoh balls with green onions, or American haroset. The book won the 1995 Julia Child Cookbook Award in the American Category. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

You don't have to be Jewish to like the latest entry in the Knopf Cooks American series. You don't even have to like Jewish cooking. A food-lover's guide to Jewish American history and culture, it dishes up not just recipes but appetizing anecdotes, insights about various forms of religious observance and how they have been affected by transplantation to the New World, even a few jokes. Nathan ( Jewish Holiday Kitchen ), a skillful writer and an energetic researcher, evokes the greenhorn's astonishment at the plentitude of oranges; documents the "revolution" in kosher cooking inspired by the introduction of vegetable shortening in the '10s; explains how enterprising Jewish admen convinced various food manufacturers to tailor their products for kosher consumers; calls on Southern families who replace the walnuts and almonds of Eastern European cookery with pecans, and visits Maine cooks who prepare mock lobster salad. Her focus is expansive, covering not just standard Ashkenazic and Sephardic dishes and traditions but foods and customs from Bukhara, Salonika, Israel and Georgia as well as original Jewish American hybrids. The recipes themselves, clearly outlined if not always easy to execute, constitute something of a Jewish culinary hall-of-fame, with faithfully preserved instructions for homemade bagels and pickled herring, Lindy's cheesecake and contributions from chic restaurateurs (Wolfgang Puck, Anne Rosenzweig). Illustrations not seen by PW. BOMC alternate, HomeStyle Book Club alternate.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Joan Nathan is the author of ten cookbooks and a regular contributor to The New York Times and Tablet Magazine. She is the author of the much-acclaimed Jewish Cooking in America, which in 1994 won both the James Beard Award and the IACP/Julia Child Cookbook of the Year Award; as well asThe New American Cooking which also won the James Beard and IACP Awards as best American cookbook published in 2005. Her most recent book is Quiches, Kugels, and Couscous: My Search for Jewish Cooking in France. Her other books include Foods of Israel Today, Joan Nathan's Jewish Holiday Cookbook, The Jewish Holiday Baker, The Children's Jewish Holiday Kitchen, and The Flavor of Jerusalem.

In 2004 Ms. Nathan was the Guest Curator of Food Culture USA, the 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival on the National Mall in Washington, DC, based on the research for her book, The New American Cooking.

Ms. Nathan's PBS television series, Jewish Cooking in America with Joan Nathan, was nominated in 2000 for the James Beard Award for Best National Television Food Show. She was also senior producer of Passover: Traditions of Freedom, an award-winning documentary sponsored by Maryland Public Television. Ms. Nathan has appeared as a guest on numerous radio and television programs including the Today show, Good Morning, America, and National Public Radio.

An inductee to the James Beard Foundation's Who's Who in American Food and Beverage, she has also received the Silver Spoon Award from Food Arts magazine. In addition, Ms. Nathan received an honorary degree from the Spertus Institute of Jewish Culture in Chicago and the Golda Award from the American Jewish Congress.

Joan Nathan was born in Providence, Rhode Island. She graduated from the University of Michigan with a master's degree in French literature and earned a master's in public administration from Harvard University. For three years she lived in Israel where she worked for Mayor Teddy Kollek of Jerusalem. In 1974, working for Mayor Abraham Beame in New York, she co-founded the Ninth Avenue Food Festival. The mother of three grown children, Ms. Nathan lives in Washington, D.C. and Martha's Vineyard with her husband, attorney Allan Gerson.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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The directions are clear and easy to follow.
bern
Many times I've heard someone say, "I enjoy just reading cookbooks," and thought that as silly as buying a CD just to watch it spin.
eleventhal@robertscomm.com
The cultural and historical information--arranged chronologically--is fascinating, and were that all the book offered, it would be enough.
Patricia A. Smith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 26, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book contains user-friendly recipes, and most of the ingredients called for are easily obtainable. The majority of the recipes appear to be for dishes that are actually eaten by Jews rather than for ones that are definitely not part of Jewish cuisine although they have been passed off as such by some authors. Ms. Nathan is passionate about the food she describes and provides a generous amount of information on the history, lore, and cultural and religious traditions of the Sephardic and Ashkenazic Jews who settled in America. She also includes menus, a helpful glossary of Jewish terms, and many interesting illustrations.
I would also like to recommend "Recipes and Remembrances from an Eastern Mediterranean Kitchen: A Culinary Journey through Syria, Lebanon, and Jordan," by Sonia Uvezian. This definitive volume offers superb recipes and fascinating text, including information on the region's minorities (particularly Jews and Armenians) that is not found in previous cookbooks.
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29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 24, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This cookbook is incredible. It not only has recipes I never thought I'd find, it presents a unique history of Jewish food and people in such a way as to bring a warm feeling to anyone of any background reading this book. It is no wonder this cookbook has received cookbook awards. That is its just deserts. In fact, this cookbook transcends its subject area, as well as the category of book. This is a cookbook that deserves a medal for fostering understanding of a people and their heritage. This cookbook was published at a unique time in the history of Jewish Cooking, capturing recipes that otherwise might have been lost to many.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 29, 2000
Format: Hardcover
What I love most about this cookbook is how international it is. I've never seen another cookbook with so many great recipes from so many different countries. It makes sense really, if you consider that Jews have come to the U.S. not only from Eastern Europe, but also from Egypt, Iran, Turkey, Cuba, Mexico, Morocco, Spain, etc. Consequently, many of the recipes, such as ceviche and chicken adobo, were a welcome surprise in addition to Jewish favorites such as knishes, hamantashen, and matzoh ball soup. Introducing most of the recipes are fascinating personal stories of the people who've brought their wonderful culinary traditions to America. Any food lover/cook will appreciate the heartfelt style of this excellent cookbook.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By eleventhal@robertscomm.com on October 24, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Many times I've heard someone say, "I enjoy just reading cookbooks," and thought that as silly as buying a CD just to watch it spin. Then I got Joan Nathan's Jewish Cooking in America. Sure its got great recipes--many classics you'll recognize as well multitudinous and scrumptious variations--but it is also a history of Jewish culture told through food. Here you can read about the origins of the Manichewitz brand, the vital social importance of vegetable shortening, how to keep Kosher in rural Vermont, and the first matza bakery. This book really is delightful and fascinating to read. It gave me a much deeper appreciation of Jewish ethnic cooking and greater pride of my American Jewish heritage.
But don't overlook the cooking. Here you will find recipes for the foods you haven't had since you sat on a phonebook at your grandparents' Seder table. Then after you've had the gefilte fish and cholent your Bubbie made, you can try the equally authentic, traditional recipe of another region. (Did you know there's a difference between Yankee and Southern matzah balls? The former are plain and fluffy, the latter dense and spicy). And then sample Jewish versions of traditional American fare, like Texas chili. And don't overlook the Sephardic dishes and the recipes of our Syrian brethren.
All in all, Jewish Cooking in America is a valuable addition to the kitchen and the library.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 5, 1999
Format: Hardcover
After seeing one episode of the PBS TV show (with three recipes on making mouth-watering beef brisket), I knew I had to have this cookbook. Fortunately I received it for Christmas! What I love most about this cookbook is how international it is. I've never seen another cookbook with so many great recipes from so many different countries. It makes sense really, if you consider that Jews have come to the U.S. not only from Eastern Europe, but also from Egypt, Cuba, Mexico, Morocco, Spain, etc. Consequently, many of the recipes, such as ceviche and chicken adobo, were a welcome surprise in addition to Jewish favorites such as knishes, hamantashen, and matzoh ball soup. Introducing most of the recipes are fascinating food histories and personal stories of the people who've brought their wonderful culinary traditions to America. Any food lover/cook will appreciate the heartfelt style of this excellent cookbook.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 18, 1999
Format: Hardcover
A superlative cook book.Full of history and nostalgia.Fun to read as well as to cook from.It keeps me connected to my past.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By mojosmom VINE VOICE on December 7, 2005
Format: Hardcover
News flash! Not everybody's chicken soup is the way your bubbe used to make! This is a great cookbook, filled with recipes from all over America, of Sephardic and Ashkenazic origin, influenced by where people settled. Gefilte fish is made with whitefish, salmon, haddock or shad, depending on what fish swims in the ocean, lake or river near by. There are latkes with zucchini and chili in Arizona and curried sweet potatoes in Flatbush.

Along with the recipes, you get history, culture and religion. What could be bad? Certainly not the Chocolate-filled Rugelach! Gosh, I'm getting hungry just typing this.
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