Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Jewish Renewal: Path to Healing and Transformation, A Paperback – August 24, 1995


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$2.95 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Jewish Renewal: Path to Healing and Transformation, A + Spirit Matters + Left Hand of God, The: Healing America's Political and Spiritual Crisis
Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial (August 24, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0485114062
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060976750
  • ASIN: 0060976756
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,395,446 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

For Lerner, editor of the liberal Jewish magazine Tikkun, Jews' fundamental task is the healing, repair and transformation of the world. In this impassioned, profound manifesto, he taps the roots of Jewish tradition through a close reading of the Torah, Talmud and Old Testament, seeking to reclaim the progressive impulse in Judaism which holds that nothing is inevitable about evil or social injustice. He then outlines a plan for Jewish renewal that combines commitment to family, community and tradition with a "revolutionary conception" of a compassionate God who makes freedom possible and who can assist in the task. Lerner's conviction that Jews should be involved in the fight against racism, national chauvinism, ecological destruction, women's inequality and all forms of oppression informs this spirited volume, which also includes his views on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Holocaust and neoconservatives.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Lerner, the editor of the journal Tikkun, posits that Judaism is a framework for the transformation of the self and the world. His interpretation of the classic texts, leaning heavily on the ideology of the "Jewish Renewal" movement, is much influenced by both the Kabala and New Age thinking. For example, he ingeniously explains why the male image of the deity in the Bible is grounded in an inaccurate perception of the text. And he deduces that the biblical injunctions that conflict with his own theological stance reflect a misunderstanding of God's true will. There is a lengthy polemic offering his vision of the State of Israel. While creative, his thinking is not cohesive, and he remarks that the "Jewish Renewal movement is in its toddler stage." Intended for Jewish readers of all backgrounds and levels of knowledge, this book will have primary appeal to those who already hold left-wing social and political views.
Carol R. Glatt, VA Medical Ctr. Lib., Philadelphia
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Michael Lewyn VINE VOICE on June 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
As another reviewer wrote, this book is a meal of several courses that don't always blend: in other words, a mixed bag -- but on balance, one worth reading.
Lerner's ideas about religion are often interesting. For example, Lerner tries to make sense of Abraham's almost-sacrifice of Isaac by suggesting that when Abraham heard the voice of God telling him to sacrifice Isaac, he was merely experiencing a delusion -- but when he stopped, THAT was the voice of God. Lerner's discussion of Jewish holidays is eloquent.
When it comes to politics and history (even religious history) Lerner is on shakier ground, and wrote some things that gave me pause. To name a few:
1. Lerner's criticism of Rabbinic Judaism on issues like homosexuality doesn't fully grapple with the views of his intellectual adversaries. Lerner reasons: The rabbinic authorities changed the plain meaning of the written Torah all the time, therefore we can do the same today when we deem it ethically appropriate.
What Lerner should be aware of is that some Orthodox Jews think that the rabbinic authorities themselves spoke with divine authority, because they were repeating an oral tradition ("the Oral Torah") which itself (due to a divine miracle) was passed down unchanged from Mt. Sinai. It follows that if you believe the Oral Torah doctrine, the Jewish position on homosexuality and a whole lot of other things must be written in stone--- or in other words, if its in the Mishnah and the Talmud (the leading documents of pre-medieval rabbinic Judaism), God said it.
I don't expect Lerner to endorse the Oral Torah doctrine--but he should explain to his readers why he rejects it, rather than just pretending it doesn't exist.
2.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 24, 1999
Format: Paperback
As an extremely devout, orthodox Jew, I am in wholehearted agreement with Dr. Lerner that Judaism is in need of renewal. The same is true for every religion! Over time, every religion becomes stale, and is in need of regeneration. After all, Judaism is a product of an agrarian/pastoral society, a society that could never have conceived of a world such as the one we live in today. They wrote the scriptures with no idea that we would live in a world where women were anything but child-bearing beasts of burden. So before getting your hackles up, read this book!
Unlike many (unfortunately) short-sighted religious Jews, who have apparently learned nothing from the Holocaust, Lerner openly supports the gay/lesbian civil rights movement and welcomes gays and lesbians into full participation within the Jewish community. Together with his other book "The Politics of Meaning", in "Jewish Renewal" Lerner is staking out important territory. Any thoughtful Jew or person, for that matter, needs to read this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By aikaplan@ix.netcom.com on March 21, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book had a positive impact on me, and helped to reignite my interest in Judaism. In fact, reading it made me realize how much I was never taught, and probably should have been taught, about Judaism growing up. Some of the book's ideas are no doubt controversial, which is its strength. For instance, it lays the groundwork for a Judaism which in some ways is more applicable to the world we live in than has been traditionally taught. But at the same time it retains an idealism that the religion can be used as a powerful tool to transform our world. It's enjoyable to read. The only drawback is it tends to be a little repetitive at times.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Daniel A. Spiro on May 5, 2006
Format: Paperback
As a Jew who is liberal both in theology and politics, I expected to enjoy Lerner's book. Instead, I found myself frustrated by its limitations. Lerner seems confident that he has come up with enlightened, left-leaning views on a wide range of issues, but I found the defenses of his positions unpersuasive. I saw little willingness to grapple with the best arguments that can be raised against his own preferred views. Similarly, he doesn't sufficiently acknowledge the questionable assumptions that any theologian must make before taking a position on these ever-so-difficult issues. I cannot imagine that he was successfully preaching to anyone but the choir, and if that is true, what's the point?

I sympathize with Lerner that Judaism -- indeed, ANY of the great organized religions -- is in need of the spirit of renewal. More specifically, he should be congratulated for leading a movement to inject into Judaism a warm, communal spirit that is willing to embrace change and actively seek peace. But Jewish Renewal advocates need more effective spokespeople than Lerner. They need writers and leaders that come across as more humble and self-questioning, and more willing to deal with ambiguity.

I look forward to hearing from other voices who claim to be Lerner's disciples but whose methods of communication are very different from their mentor's. Perhaps Lerner is a modern Abraham, but his movement is still awaiting its Moses.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Hudson Valley Book Hog on November 10, 2008
Format: Paperback
I read an article about this book in recent issue of Tikkun Magazine. While I have not finished reading the book yet, I have found it to be a breath of fresh air and provocative in a very positive sense. A great read for anyone of the Jewish faith seeking to reconnect or find a new way into their tradition. It might also be valuable for folks of more contemporary spiritual movements who are interested in exploring more traditional paths.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?